“spicy salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes salsa recipe fresh tomatoes red and white onion”

The tomatoes, peppers, onions, and cilantro in this homemade fresh salsa for canning recipe puts the store-bought stuff to shame! It’s a family favorite of ours, and one I spent several hours making last week.

Stir all this in the bowl, and now its time to add the tomatoes. I always use fresh tomatoes (even if I have to pay for the nice ones at the store in winter). You can do 50/50 fresh vs. canned and it will still taste good, but if you do all canned tomatoes it will taste like canned salsa which you might as well just buy at the store. That’s really the big secret to great salsa. Fresh tomatoes, fresh peppers and fresh cilantro taste a whole lot better than stuff that’s been sitting on the shelf for a few months. Back to the tomatoes though, I peel them and puree them and add them to the mix. Your bowl should be almost half full pre-tomatoes and that’s generally the ratio I use. Good salsa is about 50% tomatoes and 50% other good stuff. Stir all this really well, and now it is time to season and taste test. You will want to put in 3-4 tablespoons of salt (this is a big batch after all). I taste test while adding the salt. Not enough and it will taste a little flat, too much and it will be … too salty. If you go overboard you can add more tomatoes to dilute it (this works with the pepper heat too), but I just add some and taste until its right. Now add some black pepper and Tabasco, or experiment on other hot sauces. I also like to add a couple tablespoons vinegar and juice from one lime to add acidity. Once everything is mixed in and suits your taste, give it a final good blending and place in the refrigerator. It’s good for it to set in the cool for a few hours or even overnight as this allows all the flavors to mix together and steep. Just like a good chili, salsa is always better the next day. You should have a mammoth sized bowl of salsa that looks like it will last a month, but trust me, I doubt it makes it to the end of the week. Now its time to stock up on the Tostitos!

And something different: My husband probably wouldn’t let me try this one, because it’s fruit with savory and he doesn’t go for that kind of thing, but Donielle’s cherry tomato salsa looks so intriguing!

I do have a question though – does this recipe meet or pass any specific canning requirements for salsa? Last year it didn’t stick around long but this year if I make multiple batches some jars may hang around a little longer than others and I’m always paranoid about the safety of canning salsa. (I never give it away unless its fresh and I know they’ll eat it right away…) Any comments would be appreciated!

My daughter and I made a few batches of salsa this past autumn. The flavour is good and we have gotten many compliments on it, however I personally prefer a thicker salsa. I am definately going to try your recipe next canning season. I prefer using a pressure canner, so need to know if there is any reason you may not recommend this.

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

I have a question. I noticed from the pictures that the tomatoes when cooked look like the consistency of tomato sauce, no chunks …..however in your last picture of the finished product there is lots of tomato chunks (my kinda salsa) – how is this done?

Pour 1 can of tomatoes into a blender, and add the jalapeno pepper, onion, cilantro leaves, lemon juice, and salt. Blend until fairly smooth. Pour in the second can of tomatoes and blend briefly. Adjust seasonings to taste by adding more lemon juice and salt. Let the salsa rest for 1/2 hour before serving to allow the flavors to blend.

I never make comments on websites but I have to say that this recipe is really really good! I had to stray a bit because we did not have enough tomatoes from the garden, so I added about 30-40% roasted Tomatillos. Next time I will go and buy enough tomatoes so I can triple the recipe. This really is the best canned salsa I have ever made by a long shot! Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Here’s one of my favorite recipes for that: Crockpot Canning Salsa. It preserves all the tastes of a summer garden in one container: tomatoes, onions, cilantro, and three kinds of peppers. And it makes a nice big batch, so you can cook up a whole winter’s supply in one go.

I made your salsa today. When my husband got home from work he saw that there was a little left in the bottom of the pot and scarfed it down. He said under no circumstances are we to share these jars with anyone! Excellent recipe. Thank you so much ! I tamed it down a bit by using less jalapeno and more bell pepper. It was a perfect amount of heat for us !!

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I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be making it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.

Chop the jalapeno peppers.  If you like your salsa hot, leave the white pith/membranes.  Contrary to popular belief, it’s not the seeds that are hot, it’s the white pith that surrounds them.  It’s always recommended that you use gloves while handling chili peppers.

As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…

This actually is the exact recipe I received from the friend. I wouldn’t change processing times without mentioning it. The other recipe I used processed for 30 minutes. ??? The salsa was great last year, not overcooked at all! Strange. I’ll have to look up some other recipes to decide if I want to shorten the time. I’m all nervous about some aspects of canning now! Thanks for the note, and the resources. 🙂 Katie

You could spend all day with a knife and cutting board to chop these many ingredients for a few jars of salsa, or you could form a new relationship with your food processor. Or maybe a neighbor who owns a food processor. Truly. Food process for salsa. It’s not going to be pretty anyway.

I’m paying attention to all these canned salsa recipes. I tried two (similar) recipes this year and I don’t much like either of them. I will eat them, but they’re just not what I wanted. So next year I’ll need a new one to try! (I already have 12 pts. so it is what it is.)

Sometimes, during the summer, our tomato plants decide to have a party on the vine, so to speak, and produce way more tomatoes than we can possibly eat, even if we are eating them every day, sliced, salted, and served with a little balsamic or mayo.

We have made a lot of salsa over the years and thought we would try this recipe as we do not like thin, watery salsa. Not only does this salsa have excellent consistency, but it has the best balance of intense flavors we have ever canned. We did add a tablespoon of brown sugar for a tad bit of flavor.

We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

Hi Erin. I believe Romero peppers are real sweet, aren’t they? Aneheims are more like a mildly spicy green bell pepper. The Romeros will probably be just fine, but will make the salsa a little sweeter, which may not be a bad thing. A closer substitute would probably be poblano peppers or yellow wax/hungarian peppers. But nice thing about salsa is that you can use any peppers you like….just keep the quantity measurements the same when canning.

Thanks Theresa. People have been canning with your mom’s method for many years. And it probably does work well for your family. But it is not a recommended as safe process from the food safety police as it provides for a chance of bacteria growth in your canned jars. For legal reasons, I can’t recommended any process not blessed by the local food extensions. Sure you understand that. But I appreciate you sharing with me.

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