“salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes in a food processor salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes in a food processor”

Nope. The tomatoes have enough liquid in them already. You want to drain them before cooking, and then cook them long to get rid of as much liquid as possible. This is what gives the end salsa such a good thick consistency. Glad you asked Lise.

For many years I had in-laws from Mexico – great cooks – and also a live-in housekeeper from there. The latter also cooked for us. Salsa fresca aka pico de gallo is intended to be just that. Fresh. It is not intended to be hot. The chiles add a little pop, but are not supposed to prevail. Think of it as a piquant fresh vegetable chutney.

This is a really delicious BASIC salsa recipe. I have no idea why anyone would say it tastes disgusting. You have to make sure you have fresh ingredients though, particularly, fresh, and tasty, tomatoes. You can’t make tasty salsa without tasty ingredients! I use a jalepeno (and remove some of the seeds for my kids) and extra garlic every time. Salt plentifully. We serve it with everything Mexican – tonight chicken enchiladas, but also with carnitas tacos, chicken/steak fajitas. Love it!

[…] chunky salsa – I wasn’t satisfied with the salsa recipe I canned last month. This one is so much better! Whatever I did it was the perfect amount of heat, and the consistency is just like restaurant salsa. We will definitely enjoy this come winter. […]

Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to Canned Tomato Salsa on Simply Recipes. Thank you!

I need to start making my own salsa because we buy the jarred stuff use it for our meal and by the time we use it again it’s no longer good. At least when I make it I can control the quantity and fresh always trumps jarred. Love the brightness!

Now, I have had quite a few salsas that are wonderful.  Some are sweet and some are spicy and some are more eclectic (the mango/pineapple salsas, tomatillo, green tomato, etc.).  I just love salsa, and there are many salsa recipes that I have enjoyed.

I can lots of salsa every season. Not going to say it isn’t a lot of work. It is a of love. Make a big batch, no preservatives in it. You can eat it all winter long. I add black beans and corn to mine, it is lunch in a jar. It last 1 year after canning, but you will eat it up before a year goes by.

To prepare for a party, we typically head over to our respective supermarkets and purchase all the basics: burgers, hot dogs, buns, condiments, potato salad, chips, salsa, that wheel of vegetables with the ranch in the middle. Instead of feeding everyone something store-bought, why not feature a little appetizer from your own backyard? You obviously can’t grow hot dogs and hamburgers (…sigh), but you can make fresh garden salsa (using our recipe below) with the vegetables in your garden!

Yum. Simple, straight forward. This tastes like what I grew up with in Texas. It is exceptional with garden-fresh tomatoes. But sadly, the flavors wane substantially after just 1 day – make enough for now, but don’t bother saving the leftovers – they will be mediocre tomorrow.

SHARE “PICO DE GALLO: FRESH TOMATO SALSA” ON FACEBOOKSHARE “PICO DE GALLO: FRESH TOMATO SALSA” ON TWITTERSHARE “PICO DE GALLO: FRESH TOMATO SALSA” ON PINTERESTSHARE “PICO DE GALLO: FRESH TOMATO SALSA” ON GOOGLE+EMAIL “PICO DE GALLO: FRESH TOMATO SALSA”

1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

I made your salsa last year and it was awesome. For us here on the East Coast of Canada, we found that it required a little too much lime juice, but it turned out sooo good and I have had so many compliments. Thank you. Lillian

Hi, just one question. Last week I canned 11 pints and it came out fantastic. But got to thinking. My batch got a little too think after the cook down. So I added a cup of water to the batch to give it a little liquid. Is that OK? I thought being drained it would be acceptable to add back a little water. Thanks again for the great recipe.

This salsa looks delicious. I’ve been needing a yummy fresh salsa recipes if my tomatoes ever ripen 🙁 Don’t feel bad about your garden, mine hasn’t been doing well either. Except my tomato plants, but they’re too busy growing to be taller than I am instead of making me some beautiful fruit. I can hardly hold them back but I’m sure I’ll get some tomatoes soon 🙂

Salsa verde is a versatile Latin condiment. Serve it over tacos, grilled steak or fish, or even hot dogs. Use it to make enchiladas or flavorful slow-cooker chicken. Of course, there’s always the option to eat it plain with tortilla chips!

Made this today with my remaining garden tomatoes, roasting the tomatoes, garlic, and onions as directed. Within just a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor, the mixture turned to complete soup. I mean, there was just no salvaging a salsa type of consistency out of it. The spices are nice and I’m going to use it to make a cream of tomato soup tomorrow, but wanted to warn others who may be really needing a salsa end product. And maybe you have some tips for ensuring this doesn’t happen?

Tags: Canning Recipes, Chilies, Cilantro, Garlic, Gourmet Garden, Home Canning and Food Preservation, Mexican Recipes, Onions, Peppers, Recipes, Tomato Early Girl, Tomato Garden, Tomato Recipes, Tomatoes, Vinegar

Before meeting Gloria I assumed that salsa or picante sauce would be too difficult and time consuming to prepare at home. How wrong I was! I´m forever grateful to Gloria for generously sharing her family recipe with us, and thus with all of you.

The best way to peel tomatoes is to get a large pot of water boiling and then place the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds.  (Some suggest placing them in ice water next, but that isn’t necessary for this recipe)  When you remove the tomatoes from the boiling water their skins will start to split (you may need to assist them by piercing them with the tip of a knife) and they can then be easily peeled.

The jars need to be HOT and STERILE. I run mine through the dishwasher and keep them in there hot and sterile until I fill them with HOT salsa. NEVER put cold to boiling hot into glass jars of any type. You can also use a bleach bath in the sink and exchange the water occasionally from a boiling kettle to keep them hot. Just rinse the jars before filling them.

I’d say homemade salsa lasts in the fridge about 5-7 days. The longer you keep it out of the fridge when you’re using it, the shorter it will last. It’s best to pour a little in a small bowl for use and tuck the big bowlful back in the fridge right away.

Be the first to leave a comment. Don’t be shy.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>