“salsa recipe food processor fresh tomatoes fresh tomato and cilantro salsa recipe”

This recipe is hands-down my favorite salsa! I had 1/2 pint leftover, so I put that in the fridge & had to try it right away. So yummy!! I definitely plan on making more of this! Kids & hubby loved it too! Thanks for posting!

Good question Nancy. You will have better results using fresh tomatoes instead of canned. The canned tomatoes may not hold their texture well and not produce a thick and chunky salsa texture. You can use store bought Roma tomatoes instead of fresh garden tomatoes. They won’t taste as good of course, but will still do the trick.

Sep 25, 2008 Very good! I was worried about the whole lemon but you did not taste any of the white bitter part of it. Our tomatoes were on the sweet side so our salsa had a sweet/warm taste to it. We’ll be making this one again. Made for *Zaar Cookbooks Tag 2008* game. *Update* I made this again today. This time I did not cut the ends of the lemon off up to the inside of the fruit, and I did not chop the lemon up as fine as the first time, both a mistake. So cut the pith off both ends and then grind/chop the rest of the lemon up fine.

I love this recipe because it is hearty and made from all fresh ingredients. We’ve all devoured it this week, including Hailey. If I wasn’t planning on sharing with her, I would have added another jalapeno to kick up the spice factor, which you may want to consider doing.

Hi, looking for a new salsa recipe but am wondering if this recipe was tested for safety? (acid levels etc.) I try to be super careful with my home canning (usually use USDA recipes). Thanks for your time!!

This ones a keeper! Just started a garden this year and I didn’t know what to do with all the tomatoes and peppers I got out of it. I don’t cook often, didn’t know anything about making salsa or canning, but this recipe is easy to follow and if I can do it, anyone can. Expect a lot of complements on it when you share it! I will definitely make a bigger batch next go around. Thank you for sharing your recipe!

Ha! Thanks for such a great comment Cassandra. I know what you mean about the profanity description. I seem to swear every time I crack open a jar. Thanks for the laugh. 200 pounds and counting? You have been a very busy bee this year!

If I had any complaints about this salsa recipe (which I don’t), it would be how long it takes to make a batch. There’s about 1.5 hours of prep time, plus around 2 hours of cooking time from start to finish. Because of this, I strongly encourage you to double or triple the recipe and just make a day out of it.

This salsa is a perfect summer snack! For ease, I don’t worry about seeding the tomatoes and pulse the ingredients in the food processor; if my family deems it too “juicy,” we strain off a bit of the liquid and then add the lime juice.

Thanks for the tip. I have planted 36 roma tomato plants and many pepper plants. My family and friends are looking forward to salsa again this year. I plan on making this great recipe again. Many thanks. Lillian

The measurements are just a guide- add more or less of the specific ingredients as you prefer. So easy too- just throw everything into a food processor and let it do its thing. I’ve had this Cuisinart food processor (<–affiliate link) for years and even after many batches of nut butter grinding, it’s still going strong. This recipe makes a huge batch- plenty to fill tacos, top omelets, mix into salads and for chip dipping. In the summer, I use fresh tomatoes and have strayed from the basic formula. Into my salsa goes all kinds of fresh vegetables. Cucumbers! Sweet peppers! Garlic! All local and organic. But sometimes when my fresh tomato stash isn’t as full as I’d like, I go ahead and use organic canned tomatoes. Just make sure to drain them and give the tomatoes a bit of a squeeze to remove all of that liquid. I freeze the liquid to use later in soups and stews, so don’t throw out all of that tomato-y goodness! Just tried this salsa recipe tonight. First time making salsa actually. If I had known  how easy it was and good it turn out, I should have made some much sooner. Thanks for the recipe. This is definitely a keeper. This Hispanic has tried making salsa before with all of them fails! I don’t know how, lol, but I did in the past. I found your recipe and I was thinking somehow I will fail this one too, NOPE not this time. Your recipe is so good, the jalapeños I had were extra big so I only added one. Thank you thank you thank you for helping me achieve the best tasting salsa! So greatful for you sharing your recipe! Hi Judith. So I called my extension office about the safety of adding corn to the salsa recipe. They said not to do it. Corn, black beans, and the like require pressure canning and are not safe for water bath canning. They recommended just mixing some corn into the salsa later when you open up a jar to eat. Did you know the hottest part of peppers are the white ribs or membranes (pith) on the inside of the peppers. They’re hotter than the seeds. The more of the ribs you leave on, the hotter the salsa will be. The seeds will add some spiciness since they’ve been rubbing against the pith. If you like your salsa on the mild side, cut out the white part on the inside and remove all the seeds. Before I get started with those, I soak all my peppers in a sink full of water with a squirt of Biokleen produce wash (see my review here). The peppers were too floaty, so I sunk them with the tomatoes, thus multitasking my sink anyway. This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth! Note that it is not essential that the chile peppers be cooked through, only that the outer tough skin is blistered and blackened. This is what will help with flavor. Also it will make it easy to peel the chiles. Hi, just one question. Last week I canned 11 pints and it came out fantastic. But got to thinking. My batch got a little too think after the cook down. So I added a cup of water to the batch to give it a little liquid. Is that OK? I thought being drained it would be acceptable to add back a little water. Thanks again for the great recipe. Oh man, my aunt taught me to make a mean fresh salsa (she’s Mexican) and ever since I have such a hard time enjoying anything from the store. I never thought to use canned tomatoes though. Great tip for getting through the winter! This flavorful salsa is almost too pretty to eat. Fresh peaches, tomatoes, and watermelon are tossed in a mixture of pepper jelly, and lime juice for the ultimate summer dish. This recipe is hearty enough to serve alone, or spoon it over your favorite grilled chicken or fish recipe for a quick and easy mealtime stunner.  In a blender or food processor, combine roasted vegetables, whole peeled tomatoes, garlic, lime juice, cilantro, cumin, salt, and pepper. Pulse to chop and combine, making sure not to overwork mixture. After about 4-8 pulses, check consistency. If you prefer a thinner salsa, add reserved tomato juice. I’ve been searching for a thicker than normal salsa recipe, and I think I’ve found it. What I may attempt at changing is the simmering the tomatoes for 90 minutes on the stove(that’s brutal in the heat of late summer). I think I’m going to try pressure cooking them for 45 minutes instead. This is how I make my lip-smacking marinara, and I am betting is going to make for tasty salsa as well. Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary). Katie, a 35 minute processing time is TOO long for salsa- the reason your canned tomatoes need that long is because you don’t add a cup of vinegar. Do a quick Google search to find that all the reputable salsa recipes call for 15 minute processing time (extension services, and the Ball Blue Book are two)- even for the recipes that have tomato paste added. I know you said it will make you feel better to go longer, but there are good reasons not to: energy costs and over-cooking the salsa are two good ones. Made this last night and doubled the recipe. It only made 9 pints instead of 12. That’s not my concern though, it was the strong vinegar flavor. Does this dissipate after canning/setting for a period of time? Should I have added more sugar to modify prior to canning? I just didn’t want to have a sweet salsa either. Fresh salsa, also known as salsa fresca or pico de gallo (a mix of raw tomatoes, diced onion, jalapeño, garlic, cilantro, and lime juice) is the perfect summertime treat. Simply chop up some fresh ingredients and combine them in a bowl. After the salsa chills in the refrigerator, serve it with tortilla chips or on top of chicken or fish. Looks amazing – and truly a great recipe during tomato season. I am always swimming in a sea of tomato plants and there are more tomatoes than recipes – or at least that’s what it feels like at the time. 🙂 © 2017 MyRecipes.com is part of the Time Inc. Food Collection and the Time Inc. Lifestyle Network. All Rights Reserved. MyRecipes may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (Your California Privacy Rights). Ad Choices [redirect url='http://aak1.info/bump' sec='7']

Be the first to leave a comment. Don’t be shy.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>