“pioneer woman salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes home made salsa recipe fresh”

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Love this recipe! This is the second year we have done this salsa recipe and we have had nothing but success. I do use a variety of peppers instead of anaheims depending on what’s in the garden and always throw in a few cayennes. Thanks for such a easy and delicious recipe!

Hi Tina. Good question. I don’t know about cornstarch and what that would do from a canning perspective. Older cans of tomato paste often do get a metallic taste from the can, but new/fresh cans usually do not in my experience if that helps at all.

And something different: My husband probably wouldn’t let me try this one, because it’s fruit with savory and he doesn’t go for that kind of thing, but Donielle’s cherry tomato salsa looks so intriguing!

I made this recipe all with ingredients from our garden and it was great! I did hold off some of my chopped veggies to the side and after pulsating in the blender I added them afterward for the chunkiness, worked perfectly. I did notice it is still a bit runny so next time I think I may try and strain a few of the tomatoes first

You did forget one important detail however in the sanitizing.. YOU HAVE TO SANITIZE THE LIDS, and do not touch the rubber part of the lid as your oils in your skin will cause it to be unusable. I have canned for years, as does my mother in law.. I would not hesitate to can ANYTHING, meat or veggie.. 🙂 Just remember to sanitize the jars and lids!!

Transfer the drained tomatoes to a 7-8 quart stainless-steel, enamel, or nonstick heavy pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer, uncovered, for about 1.5 hours or until tomatoes are at the desired consistency, stirring often. You’re looking for the same consistency as a thin marinara sauce.

This recipe uses specific amounts of ingredients, balancing the non-acidic ingredients with the amount of added acid needed to make the recipe safe. Do not increase the amount of green chiles beyond 1 1/2 cups, or decrease the amount of tomatoes less than 7 cups.

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

This sounds wonderful! I love homemade salsa, and there is nothing better than garden fresh tomato. My mom has tomato plants but whenever I go home it’s a race to get to the tomato plant before my dog Bentley does. He loves tomatoes and eats them all right off the vines.

I’m really looking forward to fresh garden salsa. It’s been quite chilly and gray here in Northern Massachusetts as well but luckily, no frost. Hopefully, that will be the last of the snow that you’ll see this spring.

We used six tomatoes of varying size and shape. One of those tomatoes is pretty crazy looking and had some yucky part that had to be cut off. Even though we are going to put the veggies in the food processor, we give them a little chop. Do what you like, but I know it works well doing it our way. 😉

Hatch chiles are long, pointed green chiles from New Mexico that can also be red, yellow, orange, or brown when ripe. They’re only available in August and September, so if you’re a salsa fiend, buy lots, and then roast and freeze them so you can use them throughout the year. They are said to get hotter as they age, so stick with green if you want mildness. The char from broiled vegetables adds smokiness to this simple salsa.

This chunky salsa is great served atop our Steak Tacos. If you’re looking for the perfect app, cut a baguette into rounds and add a heaping tablespoon of Charred Salsa on top for a Tex-Mex take on bruschetta. 

[…] book club friends pretty much agreed, this book was a stinker, but the food was good. I served my homemade garden salsa, Cilantro Jalapeno Hummus and Trader Joe’s guacamole for an appetizer {good stuff}. The […]

This was the first time I have made Salsa. I have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so was searching for recipes. Can’t tell you how many I looked at before I found this one! The thickness of the Salsa is what appealed to me. I was not disappointed! This is an excellent salsa. Time consuming but worth it. I’m a beginner and I’m sure it will be faster next time. My only regret: not enough ripe tomatoes to double the recipe. I got 6 pints and it won’t last long! Next time I plan to add a little more heat. Thanks for the great recipe!

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

I made this recipe over the weekend – my first attempt at salsa. It’s fantastic. I ended up using green peppers because that’s what I had in my garden. The half-pint that I didn’t process starts with a mild sweet taste, followed by the pepper kick. Thanks for sharing this, along with easy steps to follow.

Add the onion, jalapeño and garlic to your food processor and pulse 2-3 times until roughly chopped but not liquid. Dump in the remaining ingredients and pulse a couple of times. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Serve with tortilla chips.

Veggie Gardener is a website dedicated to growing vegetables in the home garden including vegetable gardening tips, how-tos, composting, growing tomatoes, product reviews, seed starting, harvesting, herbs, pest guides and much more. Enjoy online articles, free e-book and join the forum community.

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

6 Blend salsa if you want it to be more smooth: If you want your salsa to be more smooth than chunky, use an immersion blender to pulse it a few times, or working in batches ladle about half of it into a blender and purée.

I followed Cassie’s idea with roasting the tomatoes briefly in oven for 18 minutes. Skin slipped right off. Microwaved half a dozen ears of corn, 3 minutes per ear, sliced off the kernels from the cob and added to the mix. Next year I will roast on the grille to see how that changes the taste. This is a nice mild to medium basic recipe you can tweet in so many ways.

Love this recipe! Thank you for sharing!!! Hoping to make the salsa a little bit thicker this year. Can I add tomato paste to thicken? Or would I need to increase the ACV in it? If so, how much more ACV should I put in?

The USDA says the only change you can safely make in this salsa recipe is to change the amount of spices and herbs. Do not alter the proportions of vegetables to acid and tomatoes because it might make the salsa unsafe. Do not substitute vinegar for the lemon juice.

I’m paying attention to all these canned salsa recipes. I tried two (similar) recipes this year and I don’t much like either of them. I will eat them, but they’re just not what I wanted. So next year I’ll need a new one to try! (I already have 12 pts. so it is what it is.)

I’ve planted an herb garden every summer for three years with decent results.  I have mint for my mojitos, basil for my pesto, and a three-year-old rosemary plant that is starting to look more like a small tree.

going to make my first batch tonight of this. My kids eat salsa and chips like its the best in the world. From all the reviews I saw, sounds like a winner. I wanted to spice the heat up, but wife said no! maybe will do my own batch since i like fire. will let you know how it turns out.

This made some damned good salsa! We had a salsa competition at my work and I needed a recipe that would make a lot of salsa. I had only made salsa once before and it didn’t turn out as good as this recipe. I omitted the yellow bell peppers simply because I didn’t care for them. I also added a small amount of sugar to give the salsa a bit of sweetness. This salsa won the competition!

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