“picante salsa recipe fresh tomatoes quick salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes”

The tomatoes, peppers, onions, and cilantro in this homemade fresh salsa for canning recipe puts the store-bought stuff to shame! It’s a family favorite of ours, and one I spent several hours making last week.

My husband’s favorite restaurant, naturally, is a local Mexican bar: “…famous Mexican cafe. It’s the great taste of Mexico right in your neighborhood.” (Can you just hear the corny commercial jingle?) It’s not exactly in our neighborhood, but it’s worth the 20-minute drive. They have a wet burrito that enables you to skip looking at the menu altogether.

On food processing for salsa: Make short layers instead of trying to pack it full. It’s easier to get larger pieces that way instead of mush. Also, use the pulse instead of just turning it on. The impact of gravity between each pulse also avoids mush.

This post is FULL of canning information, tips and equipment recommendations with affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Homemade Food junkie when you click the links and purchase we receive a small commision. You pay exactly the same as you would if you search it out yourself. If you’re new to food preservation I hope you find it useful.

THANK YOU for sharing this recipe. I have tried so many other recipes that have been a major fail. This salsa is spectacularly flavored! I used jalapeños because I am wimpy. My husband is ready for another batch, and so am I. Again, thank you for sharing this perfectly flavored salsa. YUM!

Freezer salsa may not look as fresh and perky as fresh salsa, but it’s definitely a viable alternative to canning. There will be some watery liquid after it’s thawed.  It’s really not a big deal.  If you want to serve the salsa for chip dipping, simply drain off the liquid.  If you’re using the salsa in a cooked recipe, just use as is.

This is a good basic fresh salsa recipe and I keep the tomato juice out by using roma tomatoes as they are easy to seed and you have less juice to contend with. I like using the Serrano pepper for a little different flavor, and use chopped green onions when I have them. This is an easy recipe to alter for your own specific taste.

Ball Canning is a good place to start, I doubt you’ll enjoy the excessively pickled flavor. But you have to learn to walk before you can run. Buy a pressure canner. It’s the only way to make home canned salsa using lower amounts of lime juice as a preservative. Research: Annie’s Salsa for some direction.

Homemade Salsa with fresh ingredients and full of flavor, just like the one you’re served at your favorite restaurant! This restaurant style salsa is made with roasted tomatoes and onions which enhances all the flavors. Delicious and simple!

This is fantastic! It took me the better part of the day after shopping for ingredients, and it was worth every effort. I love thick salsa and this recipe is a winner. Thanks for making this available on your site.

In the photos it looks like you used red onion. Is that your recommendation? And is that green pepper I see? Also, how fine do you cut the spicy peppers? I don’t want someone to get a big spicy mouthful!

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

I would imagine it could be canned but keep in mind I have no experience with canning so I am really just making a guess. You will have to check with a more reliable source that knows about canning tomatoes. It does freeze very well though. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help.

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Really – you didn’t like LF salsa? Did you use the NT recipe? I didn’t like it either. But I have my own recipe now, which I posted last week, that we LOVE. It tastes just like my fresh salsa, but with more of a zing. So good.

Start with fresh ingredients. The fresher they are the better the results. Don’t use canned tomatoes. It gives the salsa a metallic taste. You’ll notice that there aren’t any limes in the recipe. Whhhaaattt? Limes throw off the balance of flavors by overpowering the flavor of the tomatoes. But, if you prefer your salsa with lime try adding the juice from only one lime.

Remove the jars once processed to a towel on your counter to dry. Away from cold drafts. The jars will make little tingy popping sounds as they seal. Music to my ears! The lid tops have a raised part that depresses when they seal. Leave the jars alone until they are room temperature. The seals need time to set. It’s not recommended to move hot sealed jars.

Plums, jalapeño, basil, red onion, and a splash of lime juice come together to create a quick and fruity salsa that you and your family will love. Serve with our Pan-Grilled Chicken for a quick weeknight meal. 

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Wearing latex or plastic gloves, chop the jalapenos finely, removing veins and seeds if you wish to reduce the heat. (If you wish to reduce the heat further, replace some with regular green peppers, but do not increase the total weight of peppers in the recipe.) Chop the onion finely. Chop the tomatoes coarsely. Add the peppers, onions, tomatoes, lemon juice and salt to a large saucepan.

Is it conceited if I say we’re kind of salsa connoisseurs around here? I suppose it’s not even that we have particularly trained palates, but more because of a deep love of spicy, Mexican foods that makes us qualified.

Please correct this recipe before someone gets sick. The vinegar recipe part is way to low. It should be 1 cup not 1/2 cup. 4.0 is way too low it should be 4.6. I would do it before you end up getting in to trouble… serous

On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

I’m on the hunt for an out-of-this-world pico de gallo recipe. While this was not it, this will be my go-to base recipe for the time being. Fresh and good. Make sure to drain as much liquid from the tomatoes as possible during seeding and chopping. Let the lime juice and seasonings stand out by eliminating tomato liquid completely. Day 2 the flavor was still good in our case.

Lou: I purchased cilantro transplants last year and found out the hard way that cilantro doesn’t like root disturbance. They bolted about a week after planting them in the garden. This year, I am planning on growing batches of cilantro in soil blocks so I can alway have some new plants ready to plop in the garden. Hopefully I can keep some going all season.

Also, for those who are too lazy to put on gloves to cut chile peppers, you can always use a fork and knife, as if you were cutting them to eat them. That’s how they do it in Mexico. Just a note: they don’t even cut them with their bare hands down there, so don’t try it at home!

A large garden harvest can give you many batches of salsa. Why not set some aside in fancyjars for gifts? Salsa is very easy to can. It can sit on your shelf all year and be handy for a quick gift for a family member, friend or coworker.

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

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