“healthy fresh salsa recipe fresh mild salsa recipe food processor”

Hi! I’m Katie, and I’m the chief mess-maker around here trying to journey to better stewardship of my family’s health and the environment – while balancing a budget and limited time (did I mention I have 4 kids?).

6 Blend salsa if you want it to be more smooth: If you want your salsa to be more smooth than chunky, use an immersion blender to pulse it a few times, or working in batches ladle about half of it into a blender and purée.

We just made our second batch & I agree, a little vinegary but we like it. This recipe is supposed to mimic ‘fresh salsa’ versus that more heavy tomato tasting ones from the store. It’s tricky canning tomatoes in a water bath canner as it needs the acidity for safety; I’m looking into other recipes too that use citric acid to it’s safe to water bath can.

Just tried this salsa recipe tonight. First time making salsa actually. If I had known  how easy it was and good it turn out, I should have made some much sooner. Thanks the recipe. This is definitely a keeper.

Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Have a large bowl of ice water at the ready. Gently lower the tomatoes into the boiling water and blanch them for 60 seconds. Remove with a strainer and transfer them to the ice water. Once cool, slit the skins; they should peel off easily. Remove the cores with a small paring knife. Discard skins and cores.

Before I get started with those, I soak all my peppers in a sink full of water with a squirt of Biokleen produce wash (see my review here). The peppers were too floaty, so I sunk them with the tomatoes, thus multitasking my sink anyway.

In this salsa from Casa del Sol in Cuidad Juárez. Mexico, the peppers are roasted and the tomatoes and onions broiled, giving the salsa a deep, roasted flavor. This salsa is traditionally mashed by hand if you decide to do the same, remember to wear gloves and don’t wipe your eyes.

This is archetypal salsa, made from tomatoes, green chiles, cilantro, and lime. But more than a mere mix of ingredients, salsa de molcajete uses centuries-old techniques to combine flavors, bringing out the best of each.

Also, for those who are too lazy to put on gloves to cut chile peppers, you can always use a fork and knife, as if you were cutting them to eat them. That’s how they do it in Mexico. Just a note: they don’t even cut them with their bare hands down there, so don’t try it at home!

THANK YOU for sharing this recipe. I have tried so many other recipes that have been a major fail. This salsa is spectacularly flavored! I used jalapeños because I am wimpy. My husband is ready for another batch, and so am I. Again, thank you for sharing this perfectly flavored salsa. YUM!

1 Sterilize jars and lids in water bath: Place steamer rack in the bottom of a large (16-qt) stock pot or canning pot. Place new or clean mason jars on the rack. Fill the jars with water and fill the pot with just enough water to come to the top of the jars. Heat water to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes. (Keep the jars warm while preparing the salsa.)

Haha! I can totally relate to that. This last Summer I canned up a STORM. It was my first time canning and even though I was excited about all of the jars full of different goodies, I was kind of nervous about actually eating and of it! So, in a streak of paranoia, I had my husband consult a colleague of his who is a pathologist. I figured since he is an expert on germs he ought to know about the safety of eating canned goods. The pathologist said that as long as the lid hasn’t popped it’s completely safe and he wouldn’t hesitate to eat it or feed it to his own kids. That made me feel a whole lot better 🙂 We’ve been enjoying all the jams, relishes, pickles, apple sauce, and salsas since and…we’re still breathing! Go for it, Tori!

Some tomatoes are lingering on my kitchen counter. And would you look there? Some beautiful peppers just showed up by way of a generous co-worker enjoying a rich bounty. The stage is set to whip up a homemade batch of what is arguably America’s most popular condiment. Ketchup? Nope. We’re talking a homemade salsa recipe!

The bell peppers are necessary as a good base to the salsa but they don’t add any heat. Adding the jalapenos as listed above should make your salsa come out a notch or two above the hot stuff you get at the store (still not very hot in my opinion). Adding less or more jalapenos will vary the degree of heat to the salsa. I chop the whole pepper as well (minus the stem) as the heat is stored in the guts of the pepper which a lot of people mistakenly clean out with the seeds. Adding other varieties of hot peppers or sauces will also add flavor and make your salsa unique. Just be careful but remember experimentation is a good thing.

I usually fill one-pint jar and a small bowl and refrigerate. This will last for a while in the fridge although I have to say it doesn’t last very long in our house. But it is easy to make another fresh batch as needed.

Either works equally well. The salsa mix for canning has the advantage of being tested and easy. It’s basically corn starch, onion powder, salt and seasoning. It doesn’t have any preservative to improve the canning, so the advantage is only that it is easier.  However, I like my custom-made from fresh seasonings better, so here is the recipe for that:

This recipe is FANTASTIC!!! I have tried others and have not been satisfied with the consistency. This recipe really does end up thick and chunky and delicious. I added some mini-bell peppers (red, yellow, and orange) and only used half the cilantro, (I made a double batch). Almost everything else I left the same and the consistency, flavor and spice was fantastic. I will use this recipe again and again. Thank you so much for posting!

I have made salsa over the years and have always just frozen the batch in individual plastic containers until ready to use. Not very interested in the canning process anymore. Any problem with doing the same with your recipe.

Making this recipe is time well spent: You’ll be rewarded with lots of smoky-garlicky-peppery sauce, which keeps in the fridge for up to two weeks or in the freezer for a couple of months. There are lots of delicious ways to use it: Dip veggies or steamed shrimp in it, use it to flavor omelets, thin it with a little vinegar and water for salad dressing, try it as a sandwich spread, or smear it over pizza dough for a Spanish pie.

Once the salsa is blended, you are going to fry it in 2 tablespoons of hot cooking oil. To fry it you just pour it into the hot oil. This step is important to develop the flavor of the salsa and helps bind it. Don’t skip it.

Just a caution, you can’t simply take fresh salsa and stick it in the freezer, you do need to cook it down first.  The longer you let your salsa simmer, the more liquid will evaporate and the thicker your salsa will get.  If you want to speed up the process, add a can or two of tomato paste during the cooking process.

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I’m really looking forward to fresh garden salsa. It’s been quite chilly and gray here in Northern Massachusetts as well but luckily, no frost. Hopefully, that will be the last of the snow that you’ll see this spring.

Love this recipe! Thank you for sharing!!! Hoping to make the salsa a little bit thicker this year. Can I add tomato paste to thicken? Or would I need to increase the ACV in it? If so, how much more ACV should I put in?

If you’re looking for a fresh and flavorful salsa, this recipe is an excellent choice. The combination of diced tomatoes, peppers, and garlic make for a classic fresh salsa. Serve it with tacos, burritos, or as a party dip with tortilla roll-ups or tortilla chips. It is a very good condiment to serve alongside grilled or baked fish fillets, grilled chicken, steaks, and pork chops.

Well, our CSA farmer offered us a TON about 120 pounds of tomatoes (see the beautiful mix of reds, yellows and oranges in the bowl?) this past weekend, and me, being the glutton for bulk kitchen anything accepted his offer.

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