“great fresh salsa recipe chevys fresh mex salsa recipe”

I tried this recipe for the first this year (and also my first time canning food). I followed the instructions but I only got one jar and a half (1L jar though). Is that normal? If not, what did I did wrong? The taste is very good though. I just wish I could have more cans of salsa!

Hi Janet. I haven’t tried freezing my salsa so I’m not sure how it will be. Probably just fine would be my guess. I’m curious to know, so if you wouldn’t mind, please let me know how it works out. Thanks for commenting. Happy eating!

A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!

Ball Canning is a good place to start, but I doubt you’ll enjoy the excessively pickled flavor. But you have to learn to walk before you can run. Buy a pressure canner. It’s the only way to make home canned salsa using lower amounts of lime juice as a preservative. Research: Annie’s Salsa for some direction.

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Hi Judith. So I called my extension office about the safety of adding corn to the salsa recipe. They said not to do it. Corn, black beans, and the like require pressure canning and are not safe for water bath canning. They recommended just mixing some corn into the salsa later when you open up a jar to eat.

My husband and I have been using this recipe for our canned salsa for three years now. Your recipe is easy to follow and delicious. Our friends and family love the salsa as do we and I would never dream of looking for a different recipe. It’s perfect! Thanks for posting it!!

Once you ladle the salsa into the jars, place the lids and the bands on the jars and tighten with your hand. Once you have the lids on tight, place the jars into the water bath to process for 15 minutes. The bands keep the lids on place while the boiling water creates a pressure difference that actually seals the lids on the jars. Allow the sealed jars of salsa to cool and sit overnight. You can then take off the bands (leaving on the lids) and store the sealed jars of salsa on your pantry until you’re ready to open them up and eat them.

Use a paring knife core a tomato: Insert tip next to stem, and then make a shallow cut all around; remove stem. To seed a tomato, cut in half lengthwise. Holding cut side down, gently squeeze to remove most of the seeds. Slicing a tomato is best done with a serrated or very sharp-bladed knife.

Hi Theresa. Yes, you can double or triple the recipe for a larger batch. This recipe takes more time than others, but is so worth the effort. You picked a good one to start canning with. I hope you enjoy the results!

Katie, a 35 minute processing time is TOO long for salsa- the reason your canned tomatoes need that long is because you don’t add a cup of vinegar. Do a quick Google search to find that all the reputable salsa recipes call for 15 minute processing time (extension services, and the Ball Blue Book are two)- even for the recipes that have tomato paste added. I know you said it will make you feel better to go longer, but there are good reasons not to: energy costs and over-cooking the salsa are two good ones.

I have now made 61!jars of salsa and not sure it will get us through til next summers tomatoes! For the past month my family is eating 2 jars a week, and would eat it daily if I didn’t ration it! I got some extra tomatoes this week that I was going to just quarter and can, but made the last 13 jars instead since they love it so much! I usually share my canning with friends but they won’t get much of this!I highly recommend this recipe. We like the addition of bell peppers!

This recipe is hands-down my favorite salsa! I had 1/2 pint leftover, so I put that in the fridge & had to try it right away. So yummy!! I definitely plan on making more of this! Kids & hubby loved it too! Thanks for posting!

This sounds good. I usually make a salsa with both canned and fresh tomatoes plus the lime (my kids love the lime more than I do). I think I will try this one as mine is great but not quite “restaurant” tasting.

1 tablespoon sugar (optional – you use Stevia (in a prepared form like Truvia, it measures same as sugar; if you use another form, you’ll need do your own conversion) – or Splenda, if you prefer, if you are on a sugar-restricted diet, or simply omit the sugar)

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

I just finish making 18 pints of salsa, using this recipe with some modifications! I added 2 cups of finely dice red and green bell peppers, increased the vinegar to 3/4 cup and came out with a pH of 4.1. I let it set for about 30 minutes after mixing to mix the flavors and then I brought to a boil and only simmered for about 5 minutes, as I like less soggy salsa!

Look for large juicy tomatoes when you make salsa. Removing the seeds is easy with a small spoon. Hold the quartered tomato over a bowl to catch the seeds and juice as you scoop them out, and use it in the salsa if you like.

This was a delicious way to use ripe tomatoes. I decided to make this at the last minute to serve with pork carnitas, rice, and tortillas. I’m so glad I did – this salsa made the meal. It had a full, robust flavor and was the perfect complement to the other items served.

I’ve tried to make this salsa twice.. with the exact measurements ( which is usually hard for me to do) and I keep coming up with a rosy/peach color… it’s not the vibrant red in your picture. Any idea why?

Getty Stewart is an engaging speaker and writer providing tasty recipes, time-saving tips, and helpful kitchen ideas to make home cooking easy and enjoyable. She is a Professional Home Economist, author of Manitoba’s best-selling Prairie Fruit Cookbook, Founder of Fruit Share, mom and veggie gardener.  Get Getty in your kitchen, at your conference or your community center today.

This flavorful salsa is almost too pretty to eat. Fresh peaches, tomatoes, and watermelon are tossed in a mixture of pepper jelly, and lime juice for the ultimate summer dish. This recipe is hearty enough to serve alone, or spoon it over your favorite grilled chicken or fish recipe for a quick and easy mealtime stunner. 

You will benefit from a canning funnel and essentials when filling your jars. They are just a few dollars, last forever and are infinitely handy in the kitchen for filling canning jars and freezer bags.

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