“fresh vegetable salsa recipe best canned salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes”

Hi!! First of all thanks for responding all the questions. I want to do this salsa. First timer canning and doing salsa. I have a question if I want to do just half sweet salsa and half spicy. Any idea. Also I’m a fan of measuring by ounces/cups not counting the quantities of peppers. Congrats on this total success salsa!

“My family begs me to make this during football season, with or without company coming over. It’s so easy to make, that I don’t mind. Use caution with the jalapeno pepper, however. I recommend using kitchen or disposable gloves. These amounts are the flavor my family likes, but you can use less or more jalapeno pepper depending on your tastes.”

When processing time is complete, turn off heat and allow the canner to cool down and settle for about 10 minutes. Spread a kitchen towel on the counter; remove the cover by tilting lid away from you so that steam does not burn your face. Use a jar lifter to lift the jars from canner and place on the towel. Allow the jars to cool for 12 to 24-hours. You should hear the satisfactory “ping” of the jar lids sealing.

This actually is the exact recipe I received from the friend. I wouldn’t change processing times without mentioning it. The other recipe I used processed for 30 minutes. ??? The salsa was great last year, not overcooked at all! Strange. I’ll have to look up some other recipes to decide if I want to shorten the time. I’m all nervous about some aspects of canning now! Thanks for the note, and the resources. 🙂 Katie

Note that it is not essential that the chile peppers be cooked through, only that the outer tough skin is blistered and blackened. This is what will help with flavor. Also it will make it easy to peel the chiles.

I did not peel them, but after food processing I didn’t think the peels were a problem. The farmer I purchased the Romas from cringed when I said I didn’t peel them. “Unsightly” he said. I don’t mind!

The tomatoes come last, just because I want to be the most gentle with them, but I guess it’s not all that important. Everything thus far goes from the food processor to the 4-cup measuring cup, then into the pot.

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Fresh, juicy fruit (like mango) is the perfect addition to any salsa recipe. This easy-to-make version combines mango with bell pepper and then freshens the salsa up with a squeeze of lime juice and fresh cilantro.

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

First up, our superfast Black-Eyed Pea and Tomato Salsa comes together quickly. Adding the inner veins and seeds from the poblano chile will increase the heat in this salsa. Serve with tortilla chips for a fresh, summery appetizer.

My and I made a few batches of salsa this past autumn. The flavour is good and we have gotten many compliments on it, however I personally prefer a thicker salsa. I am definately going to try your recipe next canning season. I prefer using a pressure canner, so need to know if there is any reason you may not recommend this.

[…] cayenne (pictured here) and jalapeno peppers, pepper flakes or cayenne powder in Hot Pepper Jelly, Salsa, Tomato Jam, Stews, Popcorn Seasoning and tons of other recipes.  We like a bit of heat in our […]

Try sliceing tomatoes and layering them in a colinder with salt between each layer. Let sit over night in a cool place (not in the frig.) covered with a cloth. Try an outside sink so the juice gets away from the tomatoes, then proceed with yoiur favoriate recipe.

Hi, Mary Jane, I have been searching for the type of salsa that doesn’t use tomatoes. Your description sounds like the salsa I get at my local taco truck. I would love your Gma’s recipe. Hope you’ll post to this site! And, Dana, this is very similar to the salsa I make all the time. The only difference is I put in chipotle and adobo sauce to give it an extra smokiness and kick! Thanks

What advantage does simmering the Salsa make? Is this how it is done in most Mexican Restaurants? Believe me I am not criticizing I am just trying to learn. If this is a necessary step that I have been omitting and it will make my Salsa taste better I am all for it. I have just never heard of doing it before.

Really good! I’ve tried and tried to make salsa never with any success. When you said to seed it I thought why not peel it as well! So I dumped all my various heirlooms that I hadn’t eaten yet into boiling water for 30 seconds or so and peeled and seeded them. I also used what peppers I had on hand: a mira pepper (like a small sweeter bell) a banana pepper, and a hot purple pepper. made a mild/medium spiciness. I agree with others, double the batch! I might leave out the sugar next time to see how it tastes.

Looks amazing – and truly a great recipe during tomato season. I am always swimming in a sea of tomato plants and there are more tomatoes than recipes – or at least that’s what it feels like at the time. 🙂

Hi Erin. I believe Romero peppers are real sweet, aren’t they? Aneheims are more like a mildly spicy green bell pepper. The Romeros will probably be just fine, but will make the salsa a little sweeter, which may not be a bad thing. A closer substitute would probably be poblano peppers or yellow wax/hungarian peppers. But the nice thing about salsa is that you can use any peppers you like….just keep the quantity measurements the same when canning.

Thanks Cheryl. Glad you loved the salsa. Like you said, the recipe is pretty mild, but that way it’s a safe bet for all. I tend to add more jalapeños myself too, but the baseline recipe is a winner. Thanks for the comment. Come back again and try some other Bald Gourmet treats.

I’ve never made salsa before but wanted to after I got some tomatoes from a family member. I just did a search on pinterest and this one came up. I made it today and you’re right, it’s the best damn salsa ever!!! My kids, who are little (6, 4 and 2), could not stop eating it. I had to share with a neighbor and she said it’s the best one she’s tried. Thank you! This is my new go to recipe for salsa!

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

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I have the same complaint that you did, my salsa was too thin and too vinegary…I can’t wait to try your recipe…but will be a few months down the road since we just planted the main ingredient “tomatoes”…

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