“fresh tomato pineapple salsa recipe salsa recipe using fresh tomatoes for canning”

When the salsa is done, you can just take the easy route and store it in the freezer. But if you have the time and the equipment, canning it works even better. It’s more work, for sure. But when you open up a jar on a cold, gray January day and that tomato aroma comes rolling out just like the smell of summertime, you’ll be so glad you made the effort.

Hi, I am very excited to try this recipe but I have a question about your canning. I was very interested to see that while preparing your jars, you had them inverted in a fry pan. I have never seen this technique before as I have always boiled my jars in the water bath canner then returned them for processing after they are filled. Have you ever had any issues with chipping rims or cracking? Thanks Kate

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1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

I grew up in Southern California, so Mexican food has always been one of my favorites. This salsa is extremely mild, so it’s a good choice if you’re trying Mexican food for the first time. It’s also tasty over baked whitefish or sole.

Toss the squeezed (Squozen? 🙂 tomatoes into a colander or drainer, while you work on others. This helps more of the water to drain off.  You may want to save the liquid: if you then pass it through a sieve, screen or cheesecloth, you have fresh tomato juice; great to drink cold or use in cooking!

My roommates and I just made this and LOVED it! I have been looking for a simple, flavorful, and delicious salsa recipe and this is it! Thank you for this and all your recipes! I am looking forward to making this again and adding some pineapple or mango!

Before meeting Gloria I assumed that salsa or picante sauce would be too difficult and time consuming to prepare at home. How wrong I was! I´m forever grateful to Gloria for generously sharing her family recipe with us, and thus with all of you.

I would imagine it could be canned but keep in mind I have no experience with canning so I am really just making a guess. You will have to check with a more reliable source that knows about canning tomatoes. It does freeze very well though. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help.

That’s fantastic, Sean, I’m so glad you like it! We’re big fans of it, too, and it’s so gratifying making your own and seeing all those jars stacked in your pantry. Now, if only our garden had been as successful this year…crossing our fingers for next year!

I’d say it is mild to medium. You can definitely taste it for spiciness while cooking to judge the spiciness. During cooking the spiciness will just distribute more evenly and blend in better, so you’re not just getting heat when you bite on a piece of hot pepper.

Or I should use the plural and say “salsa-s”. Any decent Mexican dining establishment north of the border, whether a taco truck or full on restaurant will offer a variety of salsas to its patrons—tomatillo salsa verde, red chili salsa, and my favorite, a fresh tomato salsa otherwise knows as Pico de Gallo or Salsa Fresca.

I would like to make this, although we just finished off a jar of LF (roasted) salsa and it was REAL good. The only problem would be getting tomatoes in winter, so this homemade salsa would be great. Thanks.

This is the time of summer where the gardens are getting full of fresh veggies.  If you are wondering what to do with all of those garden veggies make this salsa ASAP!   This salsa uses 7 cups of fresh tomatoes and is full of such amazing flavor.

I did not peel them, but after food processing I didn’t think the peels were a problem. The farmer I purchased the Romas from cringed when I said I didn’t peel them. “Unsightly” he said. I don’t mind!

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

Drop 4 or 5 tomatoes at a time into the boiling water. Wait 2 minutes then remove from water using a slotted spoon. Slip the skins off (set them aside to make tomato powder), place tomatoes in a colander, and repeat until all tomatoes have been skinned. Discard water.

I have made salsa using this recipe twice now and its absolutely the best salsa I have ever eaten. I gave a jar to a few friends and they agree. They keep asking me when I’m making more. Luckily I have a large amount of Roma tomatoes from my garden this year. I planted extra so I would have enough to make this salsa. Thank you for this excellent recipe.

Add the onion, jalapeño and garlic to your food processor and pulse 2-3 times until roughly chopped but not liquid. Dump in the remaining ingredients and pulse a couple of times. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Serve with tortilla chips.

We make salsa using our charcoal grill- just put the tomatoes, green peppers, onions, whatever you want, directly onto the hot coals. After about an hour, take them off and let them cool, then rub off the charred skin (leave some on for more smokey flavor!), put them in a food processor with some seasonings and voila! We usually roast a head (?) of garlic at the same time and throw half of it in the salsa.

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

I made this salsa today; included the cumin, lime and garlic as suggested. However, I had to use diced green chiles instead of the serrano peppers because the peppers are too hot for my family (I like it but…they won out). Mild and delish! Next time I may use roasted romas instead of regular roma tomatoes. Great recipe. Gracias!

Love this recipe! This is the second year we have done this salsa recipe and we have had nothing but success. I do use a variety of peppers instead of anaheims depending on what’s in the garden and always throw in a few cayennes. Thanks for such a easy and delicious recipe!

Thank you for sharing this recipe. We love it. And, I cannot tell you how excited we are to begin canning, today, for the coming year. I have to admit that we are thrilled to be making only this recipe. Needless to say – so are our tasters!

This recipe comes at the perfect time. My tomatoes are just about ripe and I was just looking in my canning cookbooks tonight for a salsa recipe and didn’t find one I liked. Can’t wait to try this one!

Hi Linda. About a year ago I got family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

Just like it sounds: wash your hands then squeeze each tomato and use your finger or a spoon to scoop and shake out most of the seeds.  You don’t need to get fanatical about it; removing just most will do. Another way to do it is to cut each tomato in half, across it, instead of lengthwise. Then just shake the seeds and juice out.

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