“fresh tomato jalapeno salsa recipe fresh chopped salsa recipe”

I love your post here. (you sound kinda like me and how I operate) 🙂 Looks like you have a blog that I should check out. I like the way you write and found myself reading every word. Now, I’m off to try this recipe!

Linda, glad the cooking saved your day! It always picks me up too. As for the jelly jars, they should be just fine. Just follow the same guidelines and leave the same headspace. I’ve canned this salsa in both pints and quarts, and can’t imagine the half pint jelly jars will make any difference. I think you can get away with less processing time doing half pints (just 10), but just do the full 15 minutes to be safe. It won’t affect the salsa any.

“Simple, fresh, delicious and a real crowd pleaser! This salsa is great served with tortilla chips ( I serve mine with along side Holy Guacamole! an Authentic Mexican Snack. ) , spooned over scrambled eggs or an accompaniment to many of your favorite mexican dishes.”

Salsa recipes tend to use jalapeno as the hot peppers but you can experiment with varieties and taste combinations. One year our jalapeno peppers didn’t yield a crop but our hot banana peppers did so we used those instead and it tasted great.

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The vinegar in this recipe is required in order to make this recipe safe for canning. You can use white or apple cider vinegar with at least 5% acidity. White vinegar is clear vinegar made by distilling corn and rye. Choose an organic brand to avoid genetically modified corn. Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apples. If you do not want to use vinegar, consider trying this Garden Fresh Salsa Recipe and freezing it instead.

As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…

This refreshingly tart salsa features Granny Smith apple, cucumber and jalapeño tossed in a mixture of fresh lime juice and brown sugar. Use it as a topping for grilled pork tenderloin or grilled pork chops.

I need to start making my own salsa because we buy the jarred stuff use it for our meal and by the time we use it again it’s no longer good. At least when I make it I can control the quantity and fresh always trumps jarred. Love the brightness!

Homemade Salsa with fresh ingredients and full of flavor, just like the one you’re served at your favorite restaurant! This restaurant style salsa is made with roasted tomatoes and onions which enhances all the flavors. Delicious and simple!

In ten minutes, you’ll collect the necessary ingredients right from the plants in your garden. In another ten minutes, you will be putting the finishing touches on homemade garden salsa that will surely impress your guests, not to mention save you at least a couple bucks at the grocery store.

Excellent fresh salsa, so much better than store bought. I used a bit less sugar as my yellow & red tomatoes fresh from the garden were sweet. I added a little good olive oil based on other reviews, this recipe is a keeper!

I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be making it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.

Bring a large pot of water to a rapid boil. Carefully drop the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds them remove. Peel the skins and squeeze the seeds to remove them along with excess water. Place the tomatoes in a colander to drain. Chop the tomatoes.

This actually is the exact recipe I received from the friend. I wouldn’t change processing times without mentioning it. The other recipe I used processed for 30 minutes. ??? The salsa was great last year, not overcooked at all! Strange. I’ll have to look up some other recipes to decide if I want to shorten the time. I’m all nervous about some aspects of canning now! Thanks for the note, and the resources. 🙂 Katie

From a flavor perspective, pineapple juice would work fine. However, when canning, the lime juice is for added acidity, required for safe long term storage. I don’t know how the acidity levels in pineapple juice and lime compare, but if they are the same, you should be good. Lemon juice is an equal alternative to lime, so you could try that instead. Hope that helps!

Welcome back to our Tuesday Garden Blog Hop! This week we are exploring ideas for making gifts from the garden. Please visit each blogger linked at the bottom of this post for more wonderful Gifts from the garden ideas.

I couldn’t dry them fast enough to prevent them all from spoiling, so we had to chop up quite a few and get them right into the freezer (you may wish to check out my post on The Easiest Way to Preserve Tomatoes.

I helped my hubby make this awesome salsa . First time salsa maker – definitely won’t be the last! His tomatoes did quite well this year and we made a double batch right away. We added some chopped pineapple and the pineapple juice, as it was a bit hot for us. My husband didn’t weigh the tomatoes and we ended up with 14 pints along with a few plastic containers. Being paranoid about food safety, is it OK that we ended up with that much and only used the required Vinegar and Lime Juice for a double batch? Also, do you think we can freeze some salsa that we didn’t seal up? Thanks for the recipe!

I just wanted to say my husband and I absolutely love this recipie! I was worried it wouldn’t be chunky enough. It was! Last summer was my first year canning and if I can do this anyone can. I will always use this recipie from this day forward! My only regret…I didn’t make it sooner at the beginning of tomato season. So I didn’t Make enough. Only got like 3 large jars and they didn’t last long. Next year I will start early and make more. Thank you for sharing your recipie for people like me!!

Hi Erin. I believe Romero peppers are real sweet, aren’t they? Aneheims are more like a mildly spicy green bell pepper. The Romeros will probably be just fine, but will make the salsa a little sweeter, which may not be a bad thing. A closer substitute would probably be poblano peppers or yellow wax/hungarian peppers. But the nice thing about salsa is that you can use any peppers you like….just keep the quantity measurements the same when canning.

Freezer salsa may not look as fresh and perky as fresh salsa, but it’s definitely a viable alternative to canning. There will be some watery liquid after it’s thawed.  It’s really not a big deal.  If you want to serve the salsa for chip dipping, simply drain off the liquid.  If you’re using the salsa in a cooked recipe, just use as is.

Blanch, peel and coarsely chop tomatoes. Measure 7 cups (1750 ml). Wearing rubber gloves remove seeds and finely chop jalapenos. Combine tomatoes, onions, green pepper, jalapeno peppers, garlic, tomato paste, vinegar, cilantro and cumin in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil gently stirring occasionally until salsa reaches desired consistency, about 30 mins.

Hahaha, we haven’t been to the Beltline Bar in forever. Mostly we don’t like the hour long wait time! We have been going to El Arriero on 28th st near Woodland Mall. My son loves the salsa and he has eaten salsa with a spoon too!

Thank you for sharing this recipe. We love it. And, I cannot tell you how excited we are to begin canning, today, for the coming year. I have to admit that we are thrilled to be making only this recipe. Needless to say – so are our tasters!

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

Thank you for this recipe. I started making this 3 years ago. I followed your recipe exactly and it was awesome! I have since made it my own with the different types of chilis I use and other seasonings and still people can’t stop raving about how good this salsa is. It truly is thick and chunky. It doesn’t taste like plain old chopped tomatoes. No, no. It’s…it’s…a perfect blend of ingredients that tastes the opposite of canned! It is cooked, but not that typical store-bought-canned taste. I made 3 dozen quarts one season hoping it would see us through the winter. Ha, was I wrong. It was all gone before we hit the middle of fall!! We use it on tacos of course, and even throw a few spoonfuls into ground meat to give our burgers a kick!

Well, the verdict is in! It’s simply the best salsa we have ever tasted, hands down! We used 10 pounds of tomatoes and adjusted your recipe ingredients proportionately. We used a combo of peppers (red chili, jalapeno, and red and green bell peppers). They produced just the right amount of heat. This amount of salsa yielded 7 pint jars and we devoured the little that was left over. We have more boxes of garden tomatoes and are excited about making another batch. Thanks again Jothan!

This Fresh Tomato salsa recipe will require  a lot of chopping. I recommend chopping the tomatoes by hand. The onions and peppers can go into a food processor to save you time and tears. If you don’t have a food processor, consider mine. Dave just bought me this Cuisinart 14 cup food processor. I LOVE it!

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