“fresh salsa recipe with cumin betty crocker fresh salsa recipe”

1 Water bath Canner (a pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

Whether you’re looking for a tasty accompaniment for your baked chicken or grilled shrimp or planning a glorious Cinco de Mayo menu, easy salsa recipes are must-haves. (As a bonus, many of our easy salsa recipes also happen to be Healthy Living recipes!) Learn more about many of the star ingredients featured in our easy salsa recipes—like peaches, mangos, tomatoes and corn—by checking out our seasonal primer.

I want garden salsa from my garden too. I didn’t do it last year, but hopefully this year will do it. I’m growing a lot more sauce tomatoes this year. Last year making sauce out of cherry tomatoes was a little annoying and the sauce came out too sweet.

One thing though, I have never heard of simmering it. I switch up making mine to where I add all ingredients into a food processor and process until well mixed and chopped and then serve, or I only place the tomatoes and spices in the food processor and process until well chopped and then add the finely chopped onions, jalapenos and cilantro and then mix manually until all is well mixed. This makes for a chunkier salsa, and again I serve immediately.

Remove the tomatoes (from water, grill or broiler) and let cool to the touch. Remove and discard the peels. Cut away any cores if you haven’t done so already. Chop the tomatoes taking care to save any juices that may come out of them.

This is a good basic fresh salsa recipe and I keep the tomato juice out by using roma tomatoes as they are easy to seed and you have less juice to contend with. I like using the Serrano pepper for a little different flavor, and use chopped green onions when I have them. This is an easy recipe to alter for your own specific taste.

At right is a picture of tomatoes from my garden – they are so much better than anything from the grocery store. And if you don’t have enough, a pick-your-own farm is the pace to go!  At right are 4 common varieties that will work:

Linda, glad the cooking saved your day! It always picks me up too. As for the jelly jars, they should be just fine. Just follow the same guidelines and leave the same headspace. I’ve canned this salsa in both pints and quarts, and can’t imagine the half pint jelly jars will make any difference. I think you can get away with less processing time doing half pints (just 10), but just do the full 15 minutes to be safe. It won’t affect the salsa any.

I helped my hubby make this awesome salsa . First time salsa maker – definitely won’t be the last! His tomatoes did quite well this year and we made a double batch right away. We added some chopped pineapple and the pineapple juice, as it was a bit hot for us. My husband didn’t weigh the tomatoes and we ended up with 14 pints along with a few plastic containers. Being paranoid about food safety, is it OK that we ended up with that much and only used the required Vinegar and Lime Juice for a double batch? Also, do you think we can freeze some salsa that we didn’t seal up? Thanks for the recipe!

karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don’t enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

The USDA does accept that if you take an approved, tested recipe and make minor alterations to ingredients that does affect the preserving properties, that should be ok.  But there are a lot of if’s in that statement.  For example, substituting 1 teaspoon of ground chili spice for 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper is probably fine, but substituting 1 cup of apple juice for 1 cup of lemon juice would not be.  Unless you really know what you’re doing, you should probably stick to the approved recipes.  The preserving recipes I publish, like the one above, are all from the USDA, universities or established canning authorities. Granny probably never did lab cultures and bacteria counts to test that her recipe was safe; you were her test guinea pig, and that’s not as reliable as a culture (next time you might get sick)

Nope. The tomatoes have enough liquid in them already. You want to drain them before cooking, and then cook them long to get rid of as much liquid as possible. This is what gives the end salsa such a good thick consistency. Glad you asked Lise.

There always a debate as to which kinds of tomatoes are the best for making salsa.  The answer is simply this:  The best tomatoes are ripe tomatoes.  Whichever ones you can find that have the most flavor.  If they happen to have a higher water content, that’s fine.  We’ll drain them.

Ladle hot salsa into hot, sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims clean with a damp towel; place lids on jars, and secure in place by hand tightening the bands onto the jars.

Well, our CSA farmer offered us a TON about 120 pounds of tomatoes (see the beautiful mix of reds, yellows and oranges in the bowl?) this past weekend, and me, being the glutton for bulk kitchen anything accepted his offer.

I’ve tried to make this salsa twice.. with the exact measurements ( which is usually hard for me to do) and I keep coming up with a rosy/peach color… it’s not the vibrant red in your picture. Any idea why?

I can lots of salsa every season. Not going to say it isn’t a lot of work. It is a labor of love. Make a big batch, no preservatives in it. You can eat it all winter long. I add black beans and corn to mine, it is lunch in a jar. It last 1 year after canning, but you will eat it up before a year goes by.

Chips and dip are an instant party hit, and there’s just no more popular combination than the classic: tortilla chips with salsa! This Fresh 5-Minute Homemade Salsa takes advantage of seasonal ingredients and adds a little kick to your next get-together or weeknight dinner!

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