“fresh salsa recipe jamie oliver fresh tomato salsa recipe with corn”

I have checked out all kinds of recipes online and your recipe is the winner I am gonna make a batch tonite I was wondering if I could use citric acid (food grade of course) instead of the lime juice and vinegar?

I think so, but maybe see if the Ball Blue Book or another official canning resource has a recipe using lemon/lime juice as the acid is critical for safe canning! I do know that you should use bottled juice and not fresh, as acid is a known quantity.

Contact Us Terms and ConditionsOnline Sale of Goods and Services Copyright PolicyShipping Information Returns, Exchanges and Sales Tax freshTECH Warranty Registration Fresh Preserving FAQs Site Map Store Locator

The name says it all. Awesome salsa, Great flavor. We added serrano peppers in place of the jalapeños to make it a little hotter. Doubling the recipe we canned 7 qtrs. Everyone loves it. Thanks for sharing

I made this recipe over the weekend – my first attempt at salsa. It’s fantastic. I ended up using green peppers because that’s what I had in my garden. The half-pint that I didn’t process starts with a mild sweet taste, followed by the pepper kick. Thanks for sharing this, along with easy steps to follow.

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

From a flavor perspective, pineapple juice would work fine. However, when canning, the lime juice is for added acidity, required for safe long term storage. I don’t know how the acidity levels in pineapple juice and lime compare, but if they are the same, you should be good. Lemon juice is an equal alternative to lime, so you could try that instead. Hope that helps!

This ones a keeper! Just started a garden this year and I didn’t know what to do with all the tomatoes and peppers I got out of it. I don’t cook often, didn’t know anything about making salsa or canning, but this recipe is easy to follow and if I can do it, anyone can. Expect a lot of complements on it when you share it! I will definitely make a bigger batch next go around. Thank you for sharing your recipe!

Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).

Tomatoes have enough acid to require only a water bath for processing; but by the time you add the other ingredients which have no acidity, you’ve got a food that can spoil easily. That’s why most salsa recipes include a couple of cups of vinegar or lemon juice (both very acidic).

Or I should use the plural and say “salsa-s”. Any decent Mexican dining establishment north of the border, whether a taco truck or full on restaurant will offer a variety of salsas to its patrons—tomatillo salsa verde, red chili salsa, and my favorite, a fresh tomato salsa otherwise knows as Pico de Gallo or Salsa Fresca.

Blanch, peel and coarsely chop tomatoes. Measure 7 cups (1750 ml). Wearing rubber gloves remove seeds and finely chop jalapenos. Combine tomatoes, onions, green pepper, jalapeno peppers, garlic, tomato paste, vinegar, cilantro and cumin in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil gently stirring occasionally until salsa reaches desired consistency, about 30 mins.

Hi Patty. I have not personally had it tested, however, I took the original recipe from Better Homes and Gardens. I changed up the pepper mix, but left total pepper quantity the same. I added more salt, and added dried paprika. It is my understanding that the addition of dried spices/herbs doesn’t affect the overall acidity in canning, and neither does salt quantity. So, I am very comfortable with the safety of this recipe, and have been eating it for 3 years will no ill effect.

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are literally millions of salsa recipes, many with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra, that simple is always best. For my salsa recipe I like to stick with the key ingredients, which in my book are tomatoes, garlic, onions, cilantro, chiles or jalapeños and a little bit of lime juice for some tanginess.

Whole New Mom, LLC is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

10 Let jars cool, lids should pop: Remove jars from the water bath and let sit on a counter for several hours until completely cool. The lids should “pop” as the cooling salsa creates a vacuum under the lid and the jars are sealed.

Just finished making the salsa with the lemon juice and it’s wonderful! Not vinegary tasting. I only planted sweet peppers this year so this is strictly a sweet salsa. Next year I’ll be adding hot peppers to the garden just for this recipe

Howdy! I’m Corey, and I’m so happy you’re here! This blog is full of my love of food, photography, family & friends. Have fun looking around! I hope you find a couple yummy recipes to try. Read more about the family here…

Stir together quick and colorful Jezebel Apple Salsa to serve with poached shrimp, grilled chicken or pork, or with your favorite chips. We love the combination of sweet apple jelly and spicy horseradish in this colorful salsa. Diced fresh mango, cilantro, and lime bring a dash of tropical flavor to the table that you won’t be able to resist. 

Be the first to leave a comment. Don’t be shy.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>