“fresh green tomato salsa recipe fresh sweet onion salsa recipe”

And for those of you wondering, can you use canned tomatoes? Yes. I have used fire-roasted canned, too, to supplement the tomatoes I had on hand. I just add the canned at the end of cooking down my fresh tomatoes. I even made a batch with all my left over tomatoes from saucers, beefsteaks, cherries…I throw into a food processor with skins on. We like it with all the bits of skins, too. Cuts down the time by a lot for making big batches like me!

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

I have made salsa using this recipe twice now and its absolutely the best salsa I have ever eaten. I gave a jar to a few friends and they agree. They keep asking me when I’m making more. Luckily I have a large amount of Roma tomatoes from my garden this year. I planted extra so I would have enough to make this salsa. Thank you for this excellent recipe.

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On adjusting the heat: You can use seeds in part or all of your jalapenos. Seeds add heat; I leave them in about half the peppers. That’s for “hot” salsa! Also, you can seek out hot peppers with more stripes or “cracks” if you like spicy, as they naturally carry a zing.

Yum. Simple, straight forward. This tastes like what I grew up with in Texas. It is exceptional with garden-fresh tomatoes. But sadly, the flavors wane substantially after just 1 day – make enough for now, but don’t bother saving the leftovers – they will be mediocre tomorrow.

I think our recipe was from another blog, but it’s just that carbonated tomatoes thing that I can’t get into. Didn’t really like LF pickles, either. I’m sticking with yogurt for my probiotics, I guess! 🙂 Katie

The easiest way to get it started it too pulse the blender 5 or 6 times until the blades start to catch. Then blend for about 30 to 45 seconds until it is fully blended but still has a coarse texture. The salsa sticks to tortilla chips better when it has a little texture.

Good morning Cheryl. If you’re looking for thick salsa, you’ve come to the right place! Our salsa is thick and tasty! The extra effort is well worth the results. There isn’t any reason you couldn’t use a pressure canner with this recipe. Let us know how it turns out.

The humble tomato packs a nutritious punch. One medium tomato has about as much fiber as a slice of whole wheat bread. Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamins C and A, plus contain potassium and phosphorous.

Many of us begin a vegetable garden with dreams of preserving the harvest dancing in our heads. Even if you don’t grow food, the fresh ingredients for homemade salsa are abundant at farmers markets and farm stands during the growing season. Stock up with enough to can a batch of homemade salsa and enjoy the delicious flavors of summer all winter long.

This made some damned good salsa! We had a salsa competition at my work and I needed a recipe that would make a lot of salsa. I had only made salsa once before and it didn’t turn out as good as this recipe. I omitted the yellow bell peppers simply because I didn’t care for them. I also added a small amount of sugar to give the salsa a bit of sweetness. This salsa won the competition!

I just wanted to say my husband and I absolutely love this recipie! I was worried it wouldn’t be chunky enough. It was! Last summer was my first year canning and if I can do this anyone can. I will always use this recipie from this day forward! My only regret…I didn’t make it sooner at the beginning of tomato season. So I didn’t Make enough. Only got like 3 large jars and they didn’t last long. Next year I will start early and make more. Thank you for sharing your recipie for people like me!!

Cook the salsa until it’s nice and hot (boiling), and then follow the instructions I posted yesterday for canning tomatoes to fill and process the jars. If it seems too juicy, you can always boil off some of the water first.

I am very excited to try this recipe. I, too, have made several batches of “runny” salsa; I like the thick stuff! I’m going to have a bumper crop of great tomatoes, so I will be busy! Thanks for the recipe!

First let me say I normally don’t comment or rate recipes, as many times the raters did not even try the recipe and gives it 5 undeserved stars, “because the recipe sounds so good”, or “the pictures make me want to try it”. Or on the other hand they give a recipe only one or two stars after they completely change the recipe and then blame the author for a bad tasteless fare. Your recipe here as written needs to be changed completely (the name that is) you should call this “The Best Damned Freaking Chunky Salsa Sauce in the Universe !!” This stuff is good, and being a self professed Salsa connoisseur I am qualified to make that judgment! I did not add the cilantro as I don’t like the taste of it, and because I refrigerated it I did not add as much lime or vinegar as one would have to do for canning. The family loved it and also proclaimed this as some of the best Salsa they ever had. Have this recipe bookmarked and will definitely make again. Thanks for some good stuff! Oh by the way you look exactly like my brother Larry!

Good question Nancy. You will have better results using fresh tomatoes instead of canned. The canned tomatoes may not hold their texture well and not produce a thick and chunky salsa texture. You can use store bought Roma tomatoes instead of fresh garden tomatoes. They won’t taste as good of course, but will still do the trick.

Hi, I am very excited to try this recipe but I have a question about your canning. I was very interested to see that while preparing your jars, you had them inverted in a fry pan. I have never seen this technique before as I have always boiled my jars in the water bath canner then returned them for processing after they are filled. Have you ever had any issues with chipping rims or cracking? Thanks Kate

Well I’m proud to say that that war has finally come to an end. I recently found a recipe in a canning magazine which provided the best of home-canned and store bought salsas. They simply called it, “Chunky Homemade Salsa.” I’ve tweaked it a bit, added a little extra, and renamed it to be more appropriately named, “Best Home Canned Thick and Chunky Salsa.”

In a blender or food processor, combine roasted vegetables, whole peeled tomatoes, garlic, lime juice, cilantro, cumin, salt, and pepper. Pulse to chop and combine, making sure not to overwork mixture. After about 4-8 pulses, check consistency. If you prefer a thinner salsa, add reserved tomato juice.

“Simple, fresh, delicious and a real crowd pleaser! This salsa is great served with tortilla chips ( I serve mine with along side Holy Guacamole! an Authentic Mexican Snack. ) , spooned over scrambled eggs or an accompaniment to many of your favorite mexican dishes.”

Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos…which I may regret…them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I’m in no huge hurry….I have wine.

Transfer the drained tomatoes to a 7-8 quart stainless-steel, enamel, or nonstick heavy pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer, uncovered, for about 1.5 hours or until tomatoes are at the desired consistency, stirring often. You’re looking for the same consistency as a thin marinara sauce.

I am Lisa, a thirty-something-year old “bride” living in the Jackson, Mississippi, metro area. By day I am a wife, mother, and freelance writer. By night, I am a cook, amateur photographer, and food blogger. Read More…

Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Have a large bowl of ice water at the ready. Gently lower the tomatoes into the boiling water and blanch them for 60 seconds. Remove with a strainer and transfer them to the ice water. Once cool, slit the skins; they should peel off easily. Remove the cores with a small paring knife. Discard skins and cores.

Slow Cooker Restaurant Style Garden Salsa has so many delicious and fresh ingredients and uses up all of those garden tomatoes.   It is so addicting you won’t be able to get enough!  It is also perfect for canning.

turned out great. made second batch replacing the cumin with two other ingredients both smell great and made it a bit more chunky. we used a walla walla sweet onion. and organic cilantro. house was very aromatic. how long do you let them sit?

This recipe is hands-down my favorite salsa! I had 1/2 pint leftover, so I put that in the fridge & had to try it right away. So yummy!! I definitely plan on making more of this! Kids & hubby loved it too! Thanks for posting!

Add all ingredients to the bowl of a food processor. Pulse about 10 or so times and until all ingredients are combined and diced, but be sure to stop before the salsa becomes too soupy. Transfer to a bowl and enjoy! Keeps well in a covered container and in the fridge for about a week.

So I made the salsa the other night. loves it. I added a extra haberno and one extra tomato paste. Squeezed out 6 pints. First time making salsa and your recipe nailed exactly what I was looking for. Thanks again

To prepare for a party, we typically head over to our respective supermarkets and purchase all the basics: burgers, hot dogs, buns, condiments, potato salad, chips, salsa, that wheel of vegetables with the ranch in the middle. Instead of feeding everyone something store-bought, why not feature a little appetizer from your own backyard? You obviously can’t grow hot dogs and hamburgers (…sigh), but you can make fresh garden salsa (using our recipe below) with the vegetables in your garden!

I love this recipe! It is my favorite! I have to admit I tweaked it a bit with a TBSP of Cumin. It gave it a smoky taste. I have also frozen the salsa. It is still really good, but I tend to drain off some of the liquid. It might be a bit less spicy, but overall it works very well! I freeze it in canning jars.

For many years I had in-laws from Mexico – great cooks – and also a live-in housekeeper from there. The latter also cooked for us. Salsa fresca aka pico de gallo is intended to be just that. Fresh. It is not intended to be hot. The chiles add a little pop, but are not supposed to prevail. Think of it as a piquant fresh vegetable chutney.

Hi, just one question. Last week I canned 11 pints and it came out fantastic. But got to thinking. My batch got a little too think after the cook down. So I added a cup of water to the batch to give it a little liquid. Is that OK? I thought being drained it would be acceptable to add back a little water. Thanks again for the great recipe.

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