“fresh cranberry salsa recipe fresh salsa recipe with cherry tomatoes”

I’d say homemade salsa lasts in the fridge about 5-7 days. The longer you keep it out of the fridge when you’re using it, the shorter it will last. It’s best to pour a little in a small bowl for use and tuck the big bowlful back in the fridge right away.

If there’s one vegetable gardeners love more than any other, it’s tomatoes. They’re not that hard to grow, and they taste sooooooo much better when they’re fresh off the vine. Some people even call them a “gateway vegetable,” because so many people start out growing just tomatoes before they move on to a full-scale garden.

Hey there. Thanks so much for this. I’m needing to move toward a salt free diet but we love Tex-Mex food! This sounds lovely. This way I can gage my own spices. I’m going to try this tomorrow. Cheers.

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This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

A great recipe – thank you so much! A suggestion though – we did the chopping of garlic, onions, peppers, juiced the limes, and toasted/ground the cumin the night before. We put them in fridge but let them come back to room temp before we added them to the tomatoes. It didn’t seem so overwhelming the day of canning. Such a blessing to find this recipe. Thanks again!

A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!

Thanks for the tip. I have planted 36 roma tomato plants and many pepper plants. My family and friends are looking forward to salsa again this year. I plan on making this great recipe again. Many thanks. Lillian

This salsa looks delicious. I’ve been needing a yummy fresh salsa recipes if my tomatoes ever ripen 🙁 Don’t feel bad about your garden, mine hasn’t been doing well either. Except my tomato plants, but they’re too busy growing to be taller than I am instead of making me some beautiful fruit. I can hardly hold them back but I’m sure I’ll get some tomatoes soon 🙂

I am a big fan of the Pioneer Woman’s salsa recipe and it’s great when fresh tomatoes aren’t available. However, since tomatoes are SO good and so cheap in the summer, I’ve really wanted to make a recipe using all fresh ingredients instead of canned for my version.

Cool, thanks Terri. It is a winner recipe for sure. You can use citric acid instead, but I’m not of the ratio. Keep in mind that the lime juice doublse as a flavor component. I prefer fresh squeezed for that, but do what you prefer or have on hand. The thick and chunky part will stay the same regardless. Hope you enjoy!

Good morning Cheryl. If you’re looking for thick salsa, you’ve come to the right place! Our salsa is thick and tasty! The extra effort is well worth the results. There isn’t any reason you couldn’t use a pressure canner with this recipe. Let us know how it turns out.

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

This quick-and-easy salsa tastes great as an accompaniment to meat dishes as well as with chips. I teach kindergarten and my husband is a county Extension agent. We’ve lived down here in the Imperial Valley for 30 years. I say “down here” because Holtville is 15 feet below sea level!

I made your salsa today. When my husband got home from work he saw that there was a little left in the bottom of the pot and scarfed it down. He said under no circumstances are we to share these jars with anyone! Excellent recipe. Thank you so much ! I tamed it down a bit by using less jalapeno and more bell pepper. It was a perfect amount of heat for us !!

A food processor makes chopping easier and less time consuming. Seed and cut the peppers into chunks, weigh them, then pulse the peppers into smaller pieces in the food processor. Add the chopped peppers to your saucepan. Chop your onions into pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan. Skin your tomatoes, cut into smaller pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan.

You’ll find recipes and wonderful people you never knew were out there. Creative and fun? Oh yeah! Food preserving is endlessly creative and makes a great hobby. Get informed, get equipped, and then get busy. The season is upon us!

Thank you for this great recipe. Best ever in the World of Salsa….. Just getting ready to make a few more batches now. Boys raided my pantry last year a few times so I definitely will be making more this year after the great harvest we had in the tomato garden!!!!

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

I also believe that roasting your tomatoes and onions gives the salsa a complexity of flavor. I prefer to roast my own tomatoes rather than buy canned roasted tomatoes. It literally only takes minutes. I like to roast the tomatoes just until they start to slightly char. I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both, totally up to you. Keep in mind though that jalapeños can range wildly in heat level, so I would try them before adding them to the salsa.

When we were invited to a picnic with friends last weekend, I was tasked with bringing a side dish. On my weekly shopping trip to Kroger, I grabbed the ingredients for this homemade salsa, as well as a couple of bags of the Mission Organics Tortilla Chips. Only the finest for my friends and family!

I want garden salsa from my garden too. I didn’t do it last year, but hopefully this year will do it. I’m growing a lot more sauce tomatoes this year. Last year making sauce out of cherry tomatoes was a little annoying and the sauce came out too sweet.

Combine the diced tomatoes, whole tomatoes, cilantro, onions, garlic, jalapeno, cumin, salt, sugar and lime juice in a blender or food processor. (This is a very large batch. I recommend using a 12-cup food processor, or you can process the ingredients in batches and then mix everything together in a large mixing bowl.) 

This refreshingly tart salsa features Granny Smith apple, cucumber and jalapeño tossed in a mixture of fresh lime juice and brown sugar. Use it as a topping for grilled pork tenderloin or grilled pork chops.

I did not peel them, but after food processing I didn’t think the peels were a problem. The farmer I purchased the Romas from cringed when I said I didn’t peel them. “Unsightly” he said. I don’t mind!

Hi Carl. I wouldn’t worry too much about it. The skins won’t really hurt anything other than the texture. Skimming them off the top sounds like a good idea, but I wouldn’t worry too much if you don’t get them all. Glad you’re trying the recipe.

I doubled this recipe for a crowd. Made the following modifications: 1. Doubled the garlic. 2. Omitted sugar. 3. Added half of a ripe fresh pineapple, trimmed & cored. (I used this amount for the doubled recipe, so just 1/4 for the regular recipe.) 4. Threw all ingredients in the food processor (did not pre-chop much)and whirled it around until it was salsa-like. I got RAVE reviews on this salsa & it’s so wonderfully fresh. After the pineapple, the doubled recipe yielded about 6 cups.

A little browning of the skin on top is desired. When done cover the tray with a cloth or piece of parment paper for about 10 min and those skins can be pulled off very easily. With this method there is less water taken in by the tomatoes inadvertently, making a much richer thicker salsa The juice emitted from the tomatoes during the broil and given up by the tomatoes when they sit, I put ontop of the stove in a pot and reduce the fluid level by at least half. Add this back into the prepared tomatoes (we don’t want to lose any of the natural acidity of the tomatoes in it’s juice). P. S. I use lime juice too! It rocks Guidelines in canning usually recommend lime juice in containers as opposed to fresh as the acidity can vary using the fresh fruits. Be safe and once again congrats!

Please correct this recipe before someone gets sick. The vinegar recipe part is way to low. It should be 1 cup not 1/2 cup. 4.0 is way too low it should be 4.6. I would do it before you end up getting in to trouble… serous

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