“the best fresh salsa recipe fresh is best salsa recipe”

I MADE THIS WHEN MY SON WAS HOME FROM COLLEGE DURING WINTER BREAK. IT WAS A HUGE HIT. HE IS COMING HOME THIS WEEKEND AND REQUESTED THE SALSA. CAN’T WAIT TO TRY IT WITH FRESH GARDEN TOMATOES THIS SUMMER. THANKS FOR THE GREAT RECIPES!!

When you slice jalapenos, smart people should wear gloves. I know you’re wise like that. You probably won’t just “try” to not touch the seeds and then make this your mantra for the rest of the night: “Don’t touch your eyes. Don’t touch your eyes. Don’t touch your eyes.”

Use a ladle to fill the hot jars with the hot salsa, leaving ¼ inch head space. Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. Make sure the jars are fully submerged under water with several inches of water above them. Remove the jars and let them rest undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.

Hi, I’m Brittany! I’m a former health coach turned SAHM to my two sweet girls. Here you’ll find delicious food, talk about the daily challenges and triumphs of motherhood, our journey into homeschooling, and our family travel adventures. I’m so glad you’re here!

This is the 2nd time I’ve made this recipe this summer. I made a double batch at the end of June (12 jars) and I’m down to my last jar so I’m making another double batch. It has been a big hit with the entire family! Thanks for such a great recipe!

“Salsas are usually mixtures of acid and low-acid ingredients; they are an example of an acidified food. The specific recipe, and sometimes preparation method, will determine if a salsa can be processed in a boiling water canner or a pressure canner. A process must be scientifically determined for each recipe. ”

Hi Patty. I have not personally had it tested, however, I took the original recipe from Better Homes and Gardens. I changed up the pepper mix, but left total pepper quantity the same. I added more salt, and added dried paprika. It is my understanding that the addition of dried spices/herbs doesn’t affect the overall acidity in canning, and neither does salt quantity. So, I am very comfortable with the safety of this recipe, and have been eating it for 3 years will no ill effect.

If you’ve been hunting for a unique salsa recipe that will dazzle taste buds, look no further. Just a few simple ingredients (grapes, bell pepper, green onions, bell pepper, lime juice, and red pepper jelly) come together to create a sweet and spicy concoction that we know you’ll love. Serve atop waffle-cut sweet potato fries, as we did here, or with your favorite hearty pita chip. 

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

10 Let jars cool, lids should pop: Remove jars from the water bath and let sit on a counter for several hours until completely cool. The lids should “pop” as the cooling salsa creates a vacuum under the lid and the jars are sealed.

Well, the verdict is in! It’s simply the best salsa we have ever tasted, hands down! We used 10 pounds of tomatoes and adjusted your recipe ingredients proportionately. We used a combo of peppers (red chili, jalapeno, and red and green bell peppers). They produced just the right amount of heat. This amount of salsa yielded 7 pint jars and we devoured the little that was left over. We have more boxes of garden tomatoes and are excited about making another batch. Thanks again Jothan!

Really good! I’ve tried and tried to make salsa never with any success. When you said to seed it I thought why not peel it as well! So I dumped all my various heirlooms that I hadn’t eaten yet into boiling water for 30 seconds or so and peeled and seeded them. I also used what peppers I had on hand: a mira pepper (like a small sweeter bell) a banana pepper, and a hot purple pepper. made a mild/medium spiciness. I agree with others, double the batch! I might leave out the sugar next time to see how it tastes.

Add all ingredients to the bowl of a food processor. Pulse about 10 or so times and until all ingredients are combined and diced, but be sure to stop before the salsa becomes too soupy. Transfer to a bowl and enjoy! Keeps well in a covered container and in the fridge for about a week.

I just wanted to say my husband and I absolutely love this recipie! I was worried it wouldn’t be chunky enough. It was! Last summer was my first year canning and if I can do this anyone can. I will always use this recipie from this day forward! My only regret…I didn’t make it sooner at the beginning of tomato season. So I didn’t Make enough. Only got like 3 large jars and they didn’t last long. Next year I will start early and make more. Thank you for sharing your recipie for people like me!!

What advantage does simmering the Salsa make? Is this it is done in most Mexican Restaurants? Believe me I am not criticizing I am just trying to learn. If this is a necessary step that I have been omitting and it will make my Salsa taste better I am all for it. I have just never heard of doing it before.

Cover the jars with at least 1-inch of water. Bring to a rolling boil and process for 15 minutes (20 minutes for altitudes 1000 to 6000 ft, 25 minutes above 6000 ft). Then turn off heat and let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes.

“Simple, fresh, delicious and a real crowd pleaser! This salsa is great served with tortilla chips ( I serve mine with along side Holy Guacamole! an Authentic Mexican Snack. ) , spooned over scrambled eggs or an accompaniment to many of your favorite mexican dishes.”

A-mazing! We moved to southern Italy and there is no salsa down here! I grew cilantro and as soon as it was ready to harvest, I tried the recipe. I made only half a batch since the peppers are different. I used roasted bell peppers and a very spicy paprika. I plan on making more and next year, I will plant anaheim and jalapeño peppers. But for now, we have salsa!!!!

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also has several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

This recipe is FANTASTIC!!! I have tried others and have not been satisfied with the consistency. This recipe really does end up thick and chunky and delicious. I added some mini-bell peppers (red, yellow, and orange) and only used half the cilantro, (I made a double batch). Almost everything else I left the same and the consistency, flavor and spice was fantastic. I will use this recipe again and again. Thank you so much for posting!

Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).

Use as much or as little jalapeño as you like. If you accidentally put in too much, add more tomatoes or even blend in a little tomato sauce if you have some on hand. This recipe also works well with canned diced tomatoes when you’re craving a taste of summer during the dark days of winter.

Taste and adjust flavor as needed, adding more salt for saltiness, lime for acidity, garlic for kick/zing, cilantro for herb flavor, pepper or mild green chilies for heat, or a little stevia or sugar to sweeten/offset heat.

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