“simple fresh chunky salsa recipe gordon ramsay fresh salsa recipe”

The best way to peel tomatoes is to get a large pot of water boiling and then place the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds.  (Some suggest placing them in ice water next, but that isn’t necessary for this recipe)  When you remove the tomatoes from the boiling water their skins will start to split (you may need to assist them by piercing them with the tip of a knife) and they can then be easily peeled.

Add the seasonings and bring to a gentle simmer, just to get it hot (180 F, if you have a thermometer). Keeping it at 180 F for 30 minutes prior to water bath processing kills any bacteria and enzymes. Adjust the heat to maintain 180 F and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Arrange the tortillas in a stack and cut into 6 equal wedges. Pour about 1-inch of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat to 350 degrees F on a deep-fat frying thermometer. Fry just a few at a time, turning occasionally, until crisp and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels; sprinkle lightly with salt, if desired. Store in an airtight container.

I like you have made great salsa in the past and it was runny I am in the process of making your recipe now and just need to know when putting jars in water bath , do I put water over the top of jars to process? The picture shows less than that . Can’t wait to dig a chip into it!

The pressure cooking idea worked out good but would work out better if I had only made the single recipe. I didn’t drain the tomatoes while prepping them; rather, I drained them for a few minutes after coming out of the pressure cooker. Next batch I make, I’m going to cook the tomatoes in the pressure cooker for 45 minutes, drain and add all of the ingredients back into the pressure cooker(one less dirty pot is a good thing).

[…] chunky salsa – I wasn’t satisfied with the salsa recipe I canned last month. This one is so much better! Whatever I did it was the perfect amount of heat, and the consistency is just like restaurant salsa. We will definitely enjoy this come winter. […]

If you are going to grill or broil the tomatoes, I recommend coring them first. Grilling is best with whole plum tomatoes; grill them on high direct heat until blackened in parts and the peels are cracked.

I made a double batch last night and my husband can’t get over how delicious this recipe is! It truly IS thick!! I am in the middle of another batch only this time I tripled it. That way I should be done for a year. Thank you SO much for sharing this recipe and taking the time to experiment to find that “just right” recipe! I really appreciate it!

I’ve been searching for a thicker than normal salsa recipe, and I think I’ve found it. What I may attempt at changing is the simmering the tomatoes for 90 minutes on the stove(that’s brutal in the heat of late summer). I think I’m going to try pressure cooking them for 45 minutes instead. This is how I make my lip-smacking marinara, and I am betting this is going to make for tasty salsa as well.

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Excellent, simple salsa recipe! Fresh, in-season produce make all the difference and are absolutely critical in achieving a good outcome. There is no way this is flavorless unless flavorless ingredients were used. Tastes better the longer it sits. HIGHLY recommend!

First let me say I normally don’t comment or rate recipes, as many times the raters did not even try the recipe and gives it 5 undeserved stars, “because the recipe sounds so good”, or “the pictures make me want to try it”. Or on the other hand they give a recipe only one or two stars after they completely change the recipe and then blame the author for a bad tasteless fare. Your recipe here as written needs to be changed completely (the name that is) you should call this “The Best Damned Freaking Chunky Salsa Sauce in the Universe !!” This stuff is good, and being a self professed Salsa connoisseur I am qualified to make that judgment! I did not add the cilantro as I don’t like the taste of it, and because I refrigerated it I did not add as much lime or vinegar as one would have to do for canning. The family loved it and also proclaimed this as some of the best Salsa they ever had. Have this recipe bookmarked and will definitely make again. Thanks for some good stuff! Oh by the way you look exactly like my brother Larry!

Prepare a boiling water bath and 4 regular-mouth pint/500ml jars. Place lids in a small saucepan, cover them with water and simmer over very low heat. Prepare jars and lids according to manufacturers instructions. Need a water bath canner? We bought this set* and it’s perfect for beginners! (*Amazon affiliate link).

I am very excited to try this recipe. I, too, have made several batches of “runny” salsa; I like the thick stuff! I’m going to have a bumper crop of great tomatoes, so I will be busy! Thanks for the recipe!

[…] For one thing, salsa is serious business around here. I may have mentioned my Tostitos addiction at some point? And runny food processor made salsa is not going to cut it. I’m sorry, it’s just not. This recipe is the best homemade salsa EVER. […]

As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…

With 120 pounds, easy is important :-)!) Well, quite a large portion of the tomatoes weren’t salvagable, and some are now in the freezer for future pasta sauce and other hot dishes, and I have a decent stash of the “Easiest Homemade Sun-Dried Tomatoes” waiting.  Yum :-)!

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In the photos it looks like you used red onion. Is that your recommendation? And is that green pepper I see? Also, how fine do you cut the spicy peppers? I don’t want someone to get a big spicy mouthful!

Just finished making the salsa with the lemon juice and it’s wonderful! Not vinegary tasting. I only planted sweet peppers this year so this is strictly a sweet salsa. Next year I’ll be adding hot peppers to the garden just for this recipe

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Cooking it in the slow cooker allows all of the fresh veggies to blend together and bring out the flavor.  The veggies soften and create the best salsa EVER!  I love the this recipe makes a lot of salsa and you are able to can it, or give it to your neighbors.

Serve this citrusy salsa with chips, or spoon it atop sautéed chicken breast or fish. If you want to make the salsa ahead, omit the cilantro and avocado, and stir them in just before serving. If you find blood oranges, substitute them for regular oranges for color.

Your local Cooperative Extension  Service  will have lots of good information on food preservation;  master preservers to help, and workshops with the latest  information on this vital topic. So go for it!

This sounds wonderful! I love homemade salsa, and there is nothing better than garden fresh tomato. My mom has tomato plants but whenever I go home it’s a race to get to the tomato plant before my dog Bentley does. He loves tomatoes and eats them all right off the vines.

I’m sure it would be fine to can as long as you know what you’re doing when it comes to canning. I think there is specific process you have to go through with the cans. I’m sorry I’m not more help, but I’ve never tried canning. Every year I tell myself I’m going to can salsa, but I never get around to doing it. I would google canning salsa, so at least you know the process. Good luck!

This is almost the same as my recipe. I’m from Nicaragua, and one thing they add there which I love doing is adding little bit of white vinegar. After letting the salsa sit for about 5 minutes, it tastes amazing! I usually use the cap of the vinegar container to measure and make sure I don’t add too much.

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!

Remove the jars once processed to a towel on your counter to dry. Away from cold drafts. The jars will make little tingy popping sounds as they seal. Music to my ears! The lid tops have a raised part that depresses when they seal. Leave the jars alone until they are room temperature. The seals need time to set. It’s not recommended to move hot sealed jars.

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Yum. Simple, straight forward. This tastes like what I grew up with in Texas. It is exceptional with garden-fresh tomatoes. But sadly, the flavors wane substantially after just 1 day – make enough for now, but don’t bother saving the leftovers – they will be mediocre tomorrow.

Love this recipe – First time I made it (double recipe) I was unable to find anaheims so I used more yellow and some red peppers. I had the family helping chop so we did it manually. The next batch (following the recipe ingredients exactly) I tripled and was on my own so opted for the assistance of the Cuisinart on all chopping except the tomatoes. It was equally as wonderful as the chunky version – much faster and easier on the forearms. This is a new family favourite and going fast…60 lbs of tomatoes next year.

Tomatoes – about 15 lbs (yes, quite a few – you remove the skins, seeds and a lot of the water, so it takes a lot to start.) You’ll need about 3 quarts of prepared chopped tomatoes. This makes about 8 pints of salsa! If you only want to make a single jar, see this page instead!

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  • Brad has a small garden in the back yard. We have tomatoes {several different types}, jalapenos, zucchini and cantaloupe. The zucchini and cantaloupe haven’t produced yet, but we have loads of tomatoes and jalapenos.
    In ten minutes, you’ll collect the necessary ingredients right from the plants in your garden. In another ten minutes, you will be putting the finishing touches on homemade garden salsa that will surely impress your guests, not to mention save you at least a couple bucks at the grocery store.
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