“salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes and jalapenos baja fresh mango salsa recipe”

I’m really looking forward to fresh garden salsa. It’s been quite chilly and gray here in Northern Massachusetts as well but luckily, no frost. Hopefully, that will be the last of the snow that you’ll see this spring.

Made this for our annual Halloween Bash! And it was GONE! A perfect fresh salsa, and so easy to make. So many people asked for the recipe. I did use only one small habanero. Still super spicy. It is a keeper and is now my ONLY tomato salsa recipe. No more roasting, baking or complications.

Did you know the hottest part of peppers are the white ribs or membranes (pith) on the inside of the peppers. They’re hotter than the seeds. The more of the ribs you leave on, the hotter the salsa will be. The seeds will add some spiciness since they’ve been rubbing against the pith. If you like your salsa on the mild side, cut out the white part on the inside and remove all the seeds.

I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.

And something different: My husband probably wouldn’t let me try this one, because it’s fruit with savory and he doesn’t go for that kind of thing, but Donielle’s cherry tomato salsa looks so intriguing!

Sometimes, during the summer, our tomato plants decide to have a party on the vine, so to speak, and produce way more tomatoes than we can possibly eat, even if we are eating them every day, sliced, salted, and served with a little balsamic or mayo.

Stir all this in the bowl, and now its time to add the tomatoes. I always use fresh tomatoes (even if I have to pay for the nice ones at the store in winter). You can do 50/50 fresh vs. canned and it will still taste good, but if you do all canned tomatoes it will taste like canned salsa which you might as well just buy at the store. That’s really the big secret to great salsa. Fresh tomatoes, fresh peppers and fresh cilantro taste a whole lot better than stuff that’s been sitting on the shelf for a few months. Back to the tomatoes though, I peel them and puree them and add them to the mix. Your bowl should be almost half full pre-tomatoes and that’s generally the ratio I use. Good salsa is about 50% tomatoes and 50% other good stuff. Stir all this really well, and now it is time to season and taste test. You will want to put in 3-4 tablespoons of salt (this is a big batch after all). I taste test while adding the salt. Not enough and it will taste a little flat, too much and it will be … too salty. If you go overboard you can add more tomatoes to dilute it (this works with the pepper heat too), but I just add some and taste until its right. Now add some black pepper and Tabasco, or experiment on other hot sauces. I also like to add a couple tablespoons vinegar and juice from one lime to add acidity. Once everything is mixed in and suits your taste, give it a final good blending and place in the refrigerator. It’s good for it to set in the cool for a few hours or even overnight as this allows all the flavors to mix together and steep. Just like a good chili, salsa is always better the next day. You should have a mammoth sized bowl of salsa that looks like it will last a month, but trust me, I doubt it makes it to the end of the week. Now its time to stock up on the Tostitos!

Love this recipe! Thank you for sharing!!! Hoping to make the salsa a little bit thicker this year. Can I add tomato paste to thicken? Or would I need to increase the ACV in it? If so, how much more ACV should I put in?

karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don’t enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

I just found the recipe for fajitas on Pintrest and then it linked to this one! I was looking for some flavorful inexpensive recipes to change up the same ole same ole since money is tight this month thanks to my health problems and my many, many specialists. This site seems to be the ticket! Thanks a bushel and a peck and a hug around the neck!

Hi, I am very excited to try this recipe but I have a question about your canning. I was very interested to see that while preparing your jars, you had them inverted in a fry pan. I have never seen this technique before as I have always boiled my jars in the water bath canner then returned them for processing after they are filled. Have you ever had any issues with chipping rims or cracking? Thanks Kate

Plus, tomatoes, at least, are healthier when cooked because heat releases the lycopene. So I’m more than happy to preserve fresh produce in my canner when it’s salsa, of which we can never have too much. (If you’d like to know more about fermentation, however, HERE is an amazing eCourse on the subject with almost 2 dozen multimedia lessons.)

Just wondering if you can use jalapenos instead of serrano peppers. Also, can you not use canned plum tomatoes if they have the white lining? I think this counteracts the metallic taste. And…no garlic?

Add the seasonings and bring to a gentle simmer, just to get it hot (180 F, if you have a thermometer). Keeping it at 180 F for 30 minutes prior to water bath processing kills any bacteria and enzymes. Adjust the heat to maintain 180 F and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Peppers from the freezer are a mainstay of cooking in the winter – along with sliced celery and storage onions! They are all three very versatile, and when combined represent the holy trinity of cooking.

I made 15 quarts of this salsa last weekend. Just opened it today and it is AMAZINGLY good. I followed the recipe exactly and and I agree, it is somewhere between mild and medium. It is not hot. Perfect consistency and flavor. Now that I know how perfect it is, I have to make more while I still have tomatoes from the garden!

Linda, glad the cooking saved your day! It always picks me up too. As for the jelly jars, they should be just fine. Just follow the same guidelines and leave the same headspace. I’ve canned this salsa in both pints and quarts, and can’t imagine the half pint jelly jars will make any difference. I think you can get away with less processing time doing half pints (just 10), but just do the full 15 minutes to be safe. It won’t affect the salsa any.

Comments from a visitor on September 15, 2011: “I made your salsa recipe last night and we LOVED it! I look forward to canning some for the winter! Thank you for sharing! (I never removed tomato seeds/water when I make spaghetti sauce until reading your site. It cut my cooking time and I can’t wait to taste the new, thicker sauce!) ”

This is my favorite salsa recipe! Thank you for sharing it. I has to substitute half lemon half lime today. That should be ok, right? Also, I doubled the batch and got 13 1/2 pints. Last year I also had extra than what the recipe called for. I weigh and measure everything precisely. I notice that after I strain the tomatoes and boil/simmer them that the consistency is still watery. Should I just squeeze the tomatoes after staining? This still should be ok to eat even though it made more?

Sorry to hear that Jim. I don’t know what to tell you. You’re the first that I’ve heard with this issue. Did you use fresh squeezed limes or bottled lime juice? Bottled is more intense. Anyway, at 1/2 cup of fresh lime juice the flavor should be present but not overbearing. You can replace the lime juice with vinegar in the future if you’d like.

Haha… I love it! I will definitely try lime next time, but I don’t think my husband will let me leave the cumin out. He loves that stuff. Glad you enjoyed the recipe and be sure to try it again when you can get garden fresh tomatoes!

To keep the corn from drying out on the grill, soak the ears in water first. You can grill the corn and bell peppers at the same time, but check the peppers earlier, since they cook faster. The salsa is great as an appetizer or as a topping for grilled meats, fish, or poultry.

I made your salsa last year and it was awesome. For us here on the East Coast of Canada, we found that it required a little too much lime juice, but it turned out sooo good and I have had so many compliments. Thank you. Lillian

This made some damned good salsa! We had a salsa competition at my work and I needed a recipe that would make a lot of salsa. I had only made salsa once before and it didn’t turn out as good as this recipe. I omitted the yellow bell peppers simply because I didn’t care for them. I also added a small amount of sugar to give the salsa a bit of sweetness. This salsa won the competition!

[…] book club friends pretty much agreed, this book was a stinker, but the food was good. I served my homemade garden salsa, Cilantro Jalapeno Hummus and Trader Joe’s guacamole for an appetizer {good stuff}. The […]

Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place (usually takes overnight)  You can then remove the rings if you like, but if you leave them on, at least loosen them quite a bit, so they don’t rust in place due to trapped moisture. Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down (often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right away, you can still use it. Some people replace the lid and reprocess the jar, then that’s a bit iffy. If you heat the contents back up, re-jar them (with a new lid) and the full time in the canner, it’s usually ok.

We served this salsa as a bed for flaky Grilled Grouper, but feel free to serve as an appetizer with chips. Kalamata olives bring a slightly unexpected briny flavor to this salsa, which you won’t be able to resist. 

Hi Theresa. Yes, you can double or triple the recipe for a larger batch. This recipe takes more time than others, but is so worth the effort. You picked a good one to start canning with. I hope you enjoy the results!

I’ve been searching for a thicker than normal salsa recipe, and I think I’ve found it. What I may attempt at changing is the simmering the tomatoes for 90 minutes on the stove(that’s brutal in the heat of late summer). I think I’m going to try pressure cooking them for 45 minutes instead. This is how I make my lip-smacking marinara, and I am betting this is going to make for tasty salsa as well.

“I grow a wide variety of tomatoes and hot peppers in my garden every year for the sole purpose of making this recipe. The measurements aren’t exact, i.e. I use the eyeball/taste test method of cooking, but it always comes out great even if it is a little different each time.”

For many years I had in-laws from Mexico – great cooks – and also a live-in housekeeper from there. The latter also cooked for us. Salsa fresca aka pico de gallo is intended to be just that. Fresh. It is not intended to be hot. The chiles add a little pop, but are not supposed to prevail. Think of it as a piquant fresh vegetable chutney.

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