“jack’s garden fresh salsa recipe baja fresh green salsa recipe”

What do big events such as birthdays, bar mitzvahs, and college game days have in common? You may be inclined to think family, friends, and good times, but these are only minor similarities compared to the big one. These occasions all involve snacks! And, if you know anything about the Garden In Minutes team snacking preferences, the best snack by a mile is salsa!

COMBINE tomatoes, green peppers, onions, chili peppers, vinegar, garlic, cilantro, salt and hot pepper sauce, if using, in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.

Hi Lauren. Your “small air bubble” batch of salsa should be fine. Eat and enjoy! As for storage time, most canning books tell you to store in a dark cool place for up to a year. That’s sound advice, as canned food starts to loose its nutritional value after that. However, I’ve eaten a few jars of this salsa that were 2 and 3 years old, and they still tasted great and had a good texture. They maybe just weren’t as “fresh” feeling. That all being said, if your gift recipients like salsa, it probably won’t last more than a week or two!

We made 32 pints of this salsa on Labor Day. Definitely would make good Christmas presents. I posted a picture on my Facebook page and credited you for the amazing results. We live in Jerome, Idaho and still have many tomatoes in the garden so may make another batch. The instructions and pictures are great.

A great recipe – thank you so much! A suggestion though – we did the chopping of garlic, onions, peppers, juiced the limes, and toasted/ground the cumin the night before. We put them in fridge but let them come back to room temp before we added them to the tomatoes. It didn’t seem so overwhelming the day of canning. Such a blessing to find this recipe. Thanks again!

I am still a little scared of canning, enough so that I left a question at this post about headspace in canning jars (for salsa, I think you should leave about 1/2-1 inch, in other words, fill until you reach the bottom of the jar band), and I think you should probably read the canning and food safety post as well.

Also, you can separately simmer black beans with a diced white onion until the onion is completely dissolved, along with salt and pepper. Mix that half and half with the cooked salsa, as well as a couple fresh avocados and you’ll have a salsa/dip that’s incredible with blue corn chips or pretty much anything else you can think of.

Fresh corn, tomatoes, onions, and parsley are tossed with a sweet-hot vinaigrette to make this favorite summertime salsa. Pair with tortilla chips for a colorful appetizer or serve alongside grilled burgers, chicken, or ribs.

On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

I do have a question though – does this recipe meet or pass any specific canning requirements for salsa? Last year it didn’t stick around long but this year if I make multiple batches some jars may hang around a little longer than others and I’m always paranoid about the safety of canning salsa. (I never give it away unless its fresh and I know they’ll eat it right away…) Any comments would be appreciated!

Sugar is added to many spaghetti sauce and salsa recipes to cut the acidic taste of the tomatoes. It won’t make the canning “bad” like forgetting the vinegar would, so as long as you like the flavor – and I bet it will work out just fine – you’re golden! 🙂 Katie

The vinegar in this recipe is required in order to make this recipe safe for canning. You can use white or apple cider vinegar with at least 5% acidity. White vinegar is clear vinegar made by distilling corn and rye. Choose an organic brand to avoid genetically modified corn. Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apples. If you do not want to use vinegar, consider trying this Garden Fresh Salsa Recipe and freezing it instead.

We canned, labeled, taste tested, did follow-up surveys. We, our families, and our friends were the discerning critics for the process. Of the 6 recipes whose performance in previous canning adventures had qualified them to participate in this competition, this salsa was the clear winner!!! Every taste tester liked the salsa at each step – fresh, canned for a while, canned for a year. In fact, we had to keep back a single (hidden and disguised) bottle to use for the “canned for a year” competition. Our tasters loved this recipe so much that while there were plenty bottles of the other recipes around, this recipe was searched for every time they craved salsa. It is also very pretty in the jar; which, may be superficial, but is also satisfying at the end of the canning day!

Ball Canning is a good place to start, but I doubt you’ll enjoy the excessively pickled flavor. But you have to learn to walk before you can run. Buy a pressure canner. It’s the only way to make home canned salsa using lower amounts of lime juice as a preservative. Research: Annie’s Salsa for some direction.

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also has several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

Either works equally well. The salsa mix for canning has the advantage of being tested and easy. It’s basically corn starch, onion powder, salt and seasoning. It doesn’t have any preservative to improve the canning, so the advantage is only that it is easier.  However, I like my custom-made from fresh seasonings better, so here is the recipe for that:

Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).

Even so, a pressure canner affords greater safety that a boiling water bath, and is more versatile. But if you follow my recipe and use vinegar or lemon juice as stated in the recipe, the boiling water bath will work fine.

Quarter and seed tomatoes. Cut tomatoes into 1/4-inch dice and transfer to a bowl. Wearing rubber gloves, seed and finely chop chiles. Finely chop enough onion to measure 1/4 cup and chop cilantro. Stir chiles, onion, cilantro, and garlic into tomatoes with sugar and lime juice and salt and pepper to taste. Salsa may be made 1 hour ahead and kept at cool room temperature.

Thanks Cheryl. Glad you loved the salsa. Like you said, the recipe is pretty mild, but that way it’s a safe bet for all. I tend to add more jalapeños myself too, but the baseline recipe is a winner. Thanks for the comment. Come back again and try some other Bald Gourmet treats.

Homemade Salsa with fresh and full of flavor, just like the one you’re served at your favorite restaurant! This restaurant style salsa is made with roasted tomatoes and onions which enhances all the flavors. Delicious and simple!

This quick-and-easy salsa tastes great as an accompaniment to meat dishes as well as with chips. I teach kindergarten and my husband is a county Extension agent. We’ve lived down here in the Imperial Valley for 30 years. I say “down here” because Holtville is 15 feet below sea level!

© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reservedUse of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (effective 1/2/2014) and Privacy Policy (effective 1/2/2014)Your California Privacy RightsThe material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast.Ad Choices

I don’t understand why you have to cook the tomatoes for an hour and a half. If you’re draining them, that should reduce cooking time. There’d be absolutely very little nutrition left in these tomatoes don’t you think?

YummyMummyKitchen.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com, endless.com, amazonsupply.com, or myhabit.com.

This jewel-toned dip makes the most of fresh winter fruit. If you can’t find clementines, substitute tangerines. Bake the chips up to a day ahead, and store at room temperature in a zip-top plastic bag. You can also prepare the salsa, minus the avocado mixture, a day ahead. Stir in the mixture shortly before serving to keep the avocado green.

Happy Holidays LP. I used red onion simply for color presentation. The flavor is the same regardless of onion color. Same for the peppers. As for the jalapeños, you’re right. Fine dice is the way to go.

© 2017 MyRecipes.com is part of the Time Inc. Food Collection and the Time Inc. Lifestyle Network. All Rights Reserved. MyRecipes may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (Your California Privacy Rights). Ad Choices

Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place (usually takes overnight)  You can then remove the rings if you like, but if you leave them on, at least loosen them quite a bit, so they don’t rust in place due to trapped moisture. Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down (often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right away, you can still use it. Some people replace the lid and reprocess the jar, then that’s a bit iffy. If you heat the contents back up, re-jar them (with a new lid) and the full time in the canner, it’s usually ok.

Great texture (not runny) and great taste. Everyone that I’ve had try it says it’s the best salsa they have ever had. I make as is, however if it want it extra hot I add 1T ground habanero powder to the whole batch. I just ate my last jar today so thank goodness my tomatoes have finally started ripening! Thank you for sharing this recipe.

One Comment

  • I made over 20 pints of this last year with a huge 10 dollar apple box full of tomatoes. This recipe was SO good. Really the best homemade salsa I have ever, ever had. I was just finding it again for this year. I’ll definitely print it out so I don’t lose it. The one tip I would give is to have extra jalapenos on hand, in case you want it hotter. I was worried about it being too hot last year, and it ended up not being quite hot enough. It was still super good though.
    Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also hss several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂
    I was surfing for a good recipe source & picked a very basic dish. I then looked for one that had not been played with too much, and then I found you & Gloria’s salsa. Success! I also started my food journey at a young age, with my grandmother as my tutor& guide.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>