“homemade salsa recipe fresh tomatoes cilantro baja fresh pineapple salsa recipe”

Cover the canner and bring to boil over high heat. Once water boils vigorously, continue boiling for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).

I just made this using jalapeños instead of serrano. I used a larger onion and one more tomato. Now I boiled then simmered but it didn’t get as red as the photo above. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? How do I get that deep red tone?

Linda, glad the cooking saved your day! It always me up too. As for the jelly jars, they should be just fine. Just follow the same guidelines and leave the same headspace. I’ve canned this salsa in both pints and quarts, and can’t imagine the half pint jelly jars will make any difference. I think you can get away with less processing time doing half pints (just 10), but just do the full 15 minutes to be safe. It won’t affect the salsa any.

Thanks for the great recipe… I am an “ex-runny salsa guy” thanks to your recipe! I have always received compliments on everything I can up, probably because I use fresh from the garden (or tree, or vine) fruits, veggies and herbs. Getting rockin’ flavor wasn’t my problem, consistency was… not any more.

Great pico de gallo recipe, I personally like my salsa juicy so I use large tomatoes and extra lime juice. I also use this as a base for another recipe, A shrimp salsa dish, I add large chunks of cold cooked shrimp, and either Clamato juice or tomato juice and clam juice I also like a little extra cilantro. Served with French bread to dip into the juice makes a great lunch

I’m sure it would be fine to can as long as you know what you’re doing when it comes to canning. I think there is a specific process you have to go through with the cans. I’m sorry I’m not more help, but I’ve never tried canning. Every year I tell myself I’m going to can salsa, but I never get around to doing it. I would google canning salsa, so at least you know the process. Good luck!

Look for large juicy tomatoes when you make salsa. Removing the seeds is easy with a small spoon. Hold the quartered tomato over a bowl to catch the seeds and juice as you scoop them out, and use it in the salsa if you like.

Brighten up your favorite main dishes by adding fresh Serrano-Cilantro Salsa. We love serving this as a topping on our savory flank steak Suadero Tacos. Cooking the serrano peppers along with diced onion and garlic brings out a smoky flavor. Be sure to process the pepper mixture and the rest of the ingredients in order to make sure this salsa is totally dippable.

Fresh, juicy fruit (like mango) is the perfect addition to any salsa recipe. This easy-to-make version combines mango with bell pepper and then freshens the salsa up with a squeeze of lime juice and fresh cilantro.

Try sliceing tomatoes and layering them in a colinder with salt between each layer. Let sit over night in a cool place (not in the frig.) covered with a cloth. Try an outside sink so the juice gets away from the tomatoes, then proceed with yoiur favoriate recipe.

Hi! I’m Katie, and I’m the chief mess-maker around here trying to journey to better stewardship of my family’s health and the environment – while balancing a budget and limited time (did I mention I have 4 kids?).

“My husband and I love fresh salsa, so we decided to try making our own. We just started by adding ingredients, till it tasted the way we wanted. Since then, we have been growing a SALSA GARDEN in the backyard, so we can enjoy our homemade salsa all summer long!!”

One Comment

  • 32 pints is an undertaking! Glad you like the salsa Nina. Thanks for sharing with your friends. I was making peach salsa myself. If you have a source for peaches, you may want to give it a tasty try. I posted it just the other day.
    Awesome Barb! Glad it turned out so good. I do love this salsa recipe. Your modification ideas sound pretty good too. As for shelf life, I got the base for this recipe in a Better Homes and Gardens book, and mostly just modified the spices and such, so I would say its pretty safe. I’m still eating mine a year after it was canned and I haven’t killed myself off yet! You should be good for a year as well too.
    Sep 25, 2008 Very good! I was worried about the whole lemon but you did not taste any of the white bitter part of it. Our tomatoes were on the sweet side so our salsa had a sweet/warm taste to it. We’ll be making this one again. Made for *Zaar Cookbooks Tag 2008* game. *Update* I made this again today. This time I did not cut the ends of the lemon off up to the inside of the fruit, and I did not chop the lemon up as fine as the first time, both a mistake. So cut the pith off both ends and then grind/chop the rest of the lemon up fine.
    Wash, peel, seed, and chop your ingredients first, then measure or weigh them. A kitchen scale comes in very handy when preserving the harvest. I have included both weight and cup measurements in the recipe below. Select one method of measuring and stick with it throughout the recipe so the ratio of ingredients remains the same.

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