“garden fresh gourmet salsa recipe chili’s salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes”

Stir together quick and colorful Jezebel Apple Salsa to serve with poached shrimp, grilled chicken or pork, or with your favorite chips. We love the combination of sweet apple jelly and spicy horseradish in this colorful salsa. Diced fresh mango, cilantro, and lime bring a dash of tropical flavor to the table that you won’t be able to resist. 

Great recipe! I’ve never made my own salsa before now but I had a ton of Roma’s from our garden that needed to get used. I just made this recipe and it turned out so YUMMY! It’s so easy, the food processor did most of the work for me and it went really quick. Definitely making this again, maybe very soon with the tomato explosion we’re experiencing 😉 and next time I will add the second jalapeno to make it a little more spicy.

Why bottled lemon or lime juice? Bottled juice is uniformly acidic, something that’s important for food safety. Foods like salsa that are canned in a water bath do not reach the temperature of pressure-canned foods, and thus rely on things like lemon or lime juice (or vinegar) to raise the acidity to a level that prevents the growth of botulism. So do NOT skip this ingredient!

The USDA does accept that if you take an approved, tested recipe and make minor alterations to ingredients that does affect the preserving properties, that should be ok.  But there are a lot of if’s in that statement.  For example, substituting 1 teaspoon of ground chili spice for 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper is probably fine, but substituting 1 cup of apple juice for 1 cup of lemon juice would not be.  Unless you really know what you’re doing, you should probably stick to the approved recipes.  The preserving recipes I publish, like the one above, are all from the USDA, universities or established canning authorities. Granny probably never did lab cultures and bacteria counts to test that her recipe was safe; you were her test guinea pig, and that’s not as reliable as a culture (next time you might get sick)

Combine the diced tomatoes, whole tomatoes, cilantro, onions, garlic, jalapeno, cumin, salt, sugar and lime juice in a blender or food processor. (This is a very large batch. I recommend using a 12-cup food processor, or you can process the ingredients in batches and then mix everything together in a large mixing bowl.) 

The material on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. I am not a doctor and the statements on this website have not been evaluated by the FDA. It is recommended that you consult your medical care provider prior taking or relying upon any herbal product, especially women who are pregnant or nursing, and persons with known medical conditions.

Ladle hot salsa into prepared jars, leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace. Prepare the lids according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Wipe the rims, apply lids and rings and process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes.

I grew up in Southern California, so Mexican food has always been one of my favorites. This salsa is extremely mild, so it’s a good choice if you’re trying Mexican food for the first time. It’s also tasty over baked whitefish or sole.

This quick-and-easy salsa tastes great as an accompaniment to meat dishes as well as with chips. I teach kindergarten and my husband is a county Extension agent. We’ve lived down here in the Imperial Valley for 30 years. I say “down here” because Holtville is 15 feet below sea level!

The jars need to be HOT and STERILE. I run mine through the dishwasher and keep them in there hot and sterile until I fill them with HOT salsa. NEVER put cold to boiling hot into glass jars of any type. You can also use a bleach bath in the sink and exchange the water occasionally from a boiling kettle to keep them hot. Just rinse the jars before filling them.

I think I have remedied the fruitworm problem.  The husband and I were actually able to harvest enough cherry tomatoes to make a nice shish kebab last weekend and two homegrown roma tomatoes and a jalapeno pepper went into the making of this garden fresh salsa.

A food processor makes chopping easier and less time consuming. Seed and cut the peppers into chunks, weigh them, then pulse the peppers into smaller pieces in the food processor. Add the chopped peppers to your saucepan. Chop your onions into pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan. Skin your tomatoes, cut into smaller pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan.

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This semi-homemade salsa comes together in a flash. All you need to do is give corn kernals a good char in a skillet for about 2 minutes. Stir the corn into store-bought salsa, add a hearty dose of cilantro, and this so-simple salsa is ready for noshing. We like serving it with our Pork Tenderloin Wraps, but we don’t think you’ll have any problem finding even more unique and interesting ways to serve it up to friends and family. 

Brighten up your favorite main dishes by adding fresh Serrano-Cilantro Salsa. We love serving this as a topping on our savory flank steak Suadero Tacos. Cooking the serrano peppers along with diced onion and garlic brings out a smoky flavor. Be sure to process the pepper mixture and the rest of the ingredients in order to make sure this salsa is totally dippable.

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  • Prepare a boiling water bath and 4 regular-mouth pint/500ml jars. Place lids in a small saucepan, cover them with water and simmer over very low heat. Prepare jars and lids according to manufacturers instructions. Need a water bath canner? We bought this set* and it’s perfect for beginners! (*Amazon affiliate link).
    Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!
    The best salsas, in my opinion, come at the height of summer, when the garden is pumping out more ingredients that you can keep track of. And that’s a great time to whip up this quick and easy salsa. Most tomatoes turn pink when you blend them, but I’ve found romas keep their darker color. Since they’re meatier to begin with, the salsa tends to be less watery as well.

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