“garden fresh gourmet jack’s special salsa recipe fresh pineapple tomato salsa recipe”

I am Lisa, a thirty-something-year old “bride” living in the Jackson, Mississippi, metro area. By day I am a wife, mother, and freelance writer. By night, I am a cook, amateur photographer, and food blogger. Read More…

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are literally millions of salsa recipes, many with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra, that simple is always best. For my salsa recipe I like to stick with the key ingredients, which in my book are tomatoes, garlic, onions, cilantro, chiles or jalapeños and a little bit of lime juice for some tanginess.

Follow standard canning instructions to sterilize the jars and lids.  Ladle the hot salsa into the hot jars, leaving about 1/4 inch head space.  Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes.  Remove the jars and let them rest, undisturbed, for 24 hours before moving them.

I’d say it is mild to medium. You can definitely taste it for spiciness while cooking to judge the spiciness. During cooking the spiciness will just distribute more evenly and blend in better, so you’re not just getting heat when you bite on a piece of hot pepper.

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Turn your skillet into a Mexican comal, aka griddle, by slowly charring onions, garlic, and peppers in a dry skillet. We like to use this traditional dry char technique because it coaxes sweet, earthy flavors from the vegetables and gives them just a hint of smokiness.

Using canning tongs, gently remove the jars from the canner and transfer them to a kitchen towel or cooling rack, again keeping them vertical. Do not set hot jars directly on to cool counter surfaces. Leave to cool, undisturbed, for at least 12 hours. If any of the jars do not seal when cool, reprocess using the method above, or refrigerate and use immediately.

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

Sugar is added to many spaghetti sauce and salsa recipes to cut the acidic taste of the tomatoes. It won’t make the canning “bad” like forgetting the vinegar would, so as long as you like the flavor – and I bet it will work out just fine – you’re golden! 🙂 Katie

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I too often forget the air bubble step. You and I should be fine, but it is a better practice to make sure you get the air out, as this could affect the headspace while processing, thus affecting the amount of processing time required to get all the air out. This recipe includes an extra 5 minutes processing time just in case anyway, so you’ll likely be fine with the jars you forgot on. Just try to do on your next batch.

Plums, jalapeño, basil, red onion, and a splash of lime juice come together to create a quick and fruity salsa that you and your family will love. Serve with our Pan-Grilled Chicken for a quick weeknight meal. 

Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place (usually takes overnight)  You can then remove the rings if you like, but if you leave them on, at least loosen them quite a bit, so they don’t rust in place due to trapped moisture. Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down (often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right away, you can still use it. Some people replace the lid and reprocess the jar, then that’s a bit iffy. If you heat the contents back up, re-jar them (with a new lid) and the full time in the canner, it’s usually ok.

I really think the best part of going to a Mexican restaurant is the chips and salsa they serve you when you sit down.  It doesn’t hurt that it’s usually paired with a margarita great friends…  but really, there is something about that delicious restaurant style salsa!

Place the tomatoes, onions and garlic on a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes or just until the onions and tomatoes start to get a little char on them. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let the tomatoes cool for about 5 minutes.

I think I have remedied the fruitworm problem.  The husband and I were actually able to harvest enough cherry tomatoes to make a nice shish kebab last weekend and two homegrown roma tomatoes and a jalapeno pepper went into the making of this garden fresh salsa.

In a slow cooker add tomatoes, onions, peppers, apple cider vinegar, and coriander. Cook on low for 4-5 hours or high for 3-4. Right before it is done add in the cilantro, basil, and sage. Let it cool for a bit.

Can you can this particular recipe for salsa or is there another close version that could be canned? Also, how long does this keep in the refrigerator? Thank you in advnce for any and all comments on this topic.

Sometimes, during the summer, our tomato plants decide to have a party on the vine, so to speak, and produce way more tomatoes than we can possibly eat, even if we are eating them every day, sliced, salted, and served with a little balsamic or mayo.

I’m Jothan Yeager and I am The Bald Gourmet. After years of experimenting in my kitchen, creating delicious food and eating at amazing places around the world, I wanted a place to share my experiences with everyone. Thus the Bald Gourmet was born. I hope to open the doors of great food and great cooking to you, to inspire you to reach beyond prepared boxed meals, and to teach you of a world of deliciousness that has brought joy to me and those around me. Please enjoy the adventure which is The Bald Gourmet and share it with those you love.

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  • As far as the salsa goes, you do not need to add the honey if you want to leave that out. The sweetness helps to cut the acidity of the tomatoes a little bit, but it’s not necessary (especially if you’re using sweet tomatoes)! 🙂
    A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!
    They’re extremely smoky and complex, and they add a rich tomato flavor to this salsa. Supporting ingredients like onion, cilantro, lime, garlic, and jalapeño or serrano pepper round the flavors out to yield the perfect red salsa.

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