“fresh tomato salsa recipe without cilantro grilled fresh peach salsa recipe”

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We served this salsa as a bed for flaky Grilled Grouper, but feel free to serve as an appetizer with chips. Kalamata olives bring a slightly unexpected briny flavor to this salsa, which you won’t be able to resist. 

Making this recipe is time well spent: You’ll be rewarded with lots of smoky-garlicky-peppery sauce, which keeps in the fridge for up to two weeks or in the freezer for a couple of months. There are lots of delicious ways to use it: Dip veggies or steamed shrimp in it, use it to flavor omelets, thin it with a little vinegar and water for salad dressing, try it as a sandwich spread, or smear it over pizza dough for a Spanish pie.

This was a delicious way to use ripe tomatoes. I decided to make this at the last minute to serve with pork carnitas, rice, and tortillas. I’m so glad I did – this salsa made the meal. It had a full, robust flavor and was the perfect complement to the other items served.

My mouth is watering by just looking at these pictures! I will definitely going to try it this weekend. Thank you very much for the awesome recipe! Your YouTube video is so fun to watch. You deserve more subscribers and more views! Keep the awesome vides coming!

I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be making it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.

I used Roma tomatoes. 3 or 4 lbs of the little ones would have been too expensive 🙁 Really good but a little watery for my liking.. It was similar to (but still way better than) restaurant style salsa. Next time I’ll roast them first and throw half of the tomatoes and everything else in the food processor and pulse a few times before adding the rest of the tomatoes cause I want more chunky tomatoes in my salsa. I did decide to strain it and add a small can of tomato sauce to make up for the liquid and I was very happy with the result.

This is almost the same as my recipe. I’m from Nicaragua, and one thing they add there which I love doing is adding little bit of white vinegar. After letting the salsa sit for about 5 minutes, it tastes amazing! I usually use the cap of the vinegar container to measure and make sure I don’t add too much.

Hi, just one question. Last week I canned 11 pints and it came out fantastic. But got to thinking. My batch got a little too think after the cook down. So I added a cup of water to the batch to give it a little liquid. Is that OK? I thought being drained it would be acceptable to add back a little water. Thanks again for the great recipe.

For mild salsa try hot peppers lower on the Scoville scale, such as poblano or even bell pepper. Remove all veins and seeds. Offer pickled serrano peppers to guests who enjoy fiery salsa. Buy an authentic brand such as Herdez.

Salsa recipes tend to use as the hot peppers but you can experiment with varieties and taste combinations. One year our jalapeno peppers didn’t yield a crop but our hot banana peppers did so we used those instead and it tasted great.

This sounds good. I usually make a salsa with both canned and fresh tomatoes plus the lime (my kids love the lime more than I do). I think I will try this one as mine is great but not quite “restaurant” tasting.

Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Have a large bowl of ice water at the ready. Gently lower the tomatoes into the boiling water and blanch them for 60 seconds. Remove with a strainer and transfer them to the ice water. Once cool, slit the skins; they should peel off easily. Remove the cores with a small paring knife. Discard skins and cores.

Oh man, my aunt taught me to make a mean fresh salsa (she’s Mexican) and ever since I have such a hard time enjoying anything from the store. I never thought to use canned tomatoes though. Great tip for getting through the winter!

I’d say homemade salsa lasts in the fridge about 5-7 days. The longer you keep it out of the fridge when you’re using it, the shorter it will last. It’s best to pour a little in a small bowl for use and tuck the big bowlful back in the fridge right away.

This recipe uses specific amounts of ingredients, balancing the non-acidic ingredients with the amount of added acid needed to make the recipe safe. Do not increase the amount of green chiles beyond 1 1/2 cups, or decrease the amount of tomatoes less than 7 cups.

A food processor makes chopping easier and less time consuming. Seed and cut the peppers into chunks, weigh them, then pulse the peppers into smaller pieces in the food processor. Add the chopped peppers to your saucepan. Chop your onions into pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan. Skin your tomatoes, cut into smaller pieces, weigh them, pulse in the food processor, and add to your saucepan.

Yep, my husband and I know the best and worst Mexican restaurants to go to for the chips and salsa. After all, chips and salsa make the meal! I always over-indulge on them at Mexican restaurants, but it’s the best part. I love your homemade salsa, Blair! I could see myself devouring this ALL in no time. Looks so good!

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Before I get started with those, I soak all my peppers in a sink full of water with a squirt of Biokleen produce wash (see my review here). The peppers were too floaty, so I sunk them with the tomatoes, thus multitasking my sink anyway.

Glad you love the salsa Maria. Yes, you should be fine with half lemon and half lime. Sometimes my batches come out with a little extra as well. You should be fine. Most canning recipes vary in quantity results from one batch to another. Par for the course I guess. Anyway, thanks for the comment.

Wash, peel, seed, and chop your ingredients first, then measure or weigh them. A kitchen scale comes in very handy when preserving the harvest. I have included both weight and cup measurements in the recipe below. Select one method of measuring and stick with it throughout the recipe so the ratio of ingredients remains the same.

I prefer to refrigerate salsa for 1 day prior to serving to allow the flavors to marry and meld. Salsa will keep for about 1 week in an airtight container or jar in the fridge; however, it’s never lasted that long in this household.

Haha… I love it! I will definitely try lime next time, but I don’t think my husband will let me leave the cumin out. He loves that stuff. Glad you enjoyed the recipe and be sure to try it again when you can get garden fresh tomatoes!

PROCESS both pint and half pint jars in a boiling water canner for 15 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Remove jars and cool. Check lids for seal after 24 hours. Lid should not flex up and down when center is pressed.

For spicy salsa, use a ratio of one hot pepper to three large tomatoes. Rocoto is the chile of choice in Peru, but use any chile available in your area. Add more hot peppers or a pepper higher on the Scoville scale for more heat.

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