“fresh serrano chile salsa recipe salsa recipe fresh tomatoes jalapenos”

A friend is teaching me to can this year. She had found your recipe and thought it was the best she had ever made so we spent a day making it. We used whatever type hot peppers we found in three different

2 Roast chile peppers: Roast the Anaheim green chile peppers until blackened all over. The best way to do this is directly over a gas flame on the stovetop (see how to roast chiles over a gas flame.) If you don’t have a gas cooktop you can broil the chiles, or blister them on a grill.

In the summer, I use fresh tomatoes and have strayed from the basic formula. Into my salsa goes all kinds of fresh vegetables. Cucumbers! Sweet peppers! All local and organic. But sometimes when my fresh tomato stash isn’t as full as I’d like, I go ahead and use organic canned tomatoes. Just make sure to drain them and give the tomatoes a bit of a squeeze to remove all of that liquid. I freeze the liquid to use later in soups and stews, so don’t throw out all of that tomato-y goodness!

Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos…which I may regret…them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I’m in no huge hurry….I have wine.

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make and tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

I just made this using jalapeños instead of serrano. I used a larger onion and one more tomato. Now I boiled then simmered but it didn’t get as red as the photo above. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? How do I get that deep red tone?

Looks like an awesome recipe; we’re trying it tonight. All of our garden tomatoes and peppers are ready for the task. I noticed that some folks were wondering about the tomatoe pounds to cooked cups conversion. I found out that 2 1/2 pounds (1.1 kg) tomatoes = 3 cups chopped and drained fresh tomatoes = 2 1/2 cups chopped and cooked tomatoes = 2 1/2 cups canned tomatoes in puree or juice. You can also substitute apple cider vinegar (ACV) for white vinegar. We mixed up the peppers too, since we like it spicy. Looking forward to a positive result. Thanks Jothan, I’ll let you know how it turns out and we’ll have to check out other recipes that you’ve posted. Cheers!

I made this recipe over the weekend – my first attempt at salsa. It’s fantastic. I ended up using green peppers because that’s what I had in my garden. The half-pint that I didn’t process starts with a mild sweet taste, followed by the pepper kick. Thanks for sharing this, along with easy steps to follow.

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Made with the freshest of ingredients, Avocado-Mango Salsa stands alone as an appetizer with your favorite chips, or serve this salsa as a topping on your favorite white chili. Here, we served it with White Lightning Chicken Chili.

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Streetlights flickered across the dusty lanes of La Yarada as Gloria flipped tortillas over a fiery comal, which she’d inherited from her grandmother. Ice cubes clinked inside a cocktail shaker as Joshua sloshed a tequila, amaretto and lime juice concoction into salted margarita glasses.

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

A large garden harvest can give you many batches of salsa. Why not set some aside in fancyjars for gifts? Salsa is very easy to can. It can sit on your shelf all year and be handy for a quick gift for a family member, friend or coworker.

Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

A. Well, Grandma may be sweet, but a lot of her generation died of cancer from smoking, heart attacks from eating too much saturated fat… And food poisoning! 🙂 Jam should get 5 minutes in the boiling water bath, too.

Brad has a small garden in the back yard. We have tomatoes {several different types}, jalapenos, zucchini and cantaloupe. The zucchini and cantaloupe haven’t produced yet, but we have loads of tomatoes and jalapenos.

Prep your tomatoes by blanching them a bit first. Then put them in ice-cold water before peeling. The peels should loosen from the tomatoes. Much easier to peel tomatoes this way. Just don’t Cook the tomatoes. Keep an eye on them. If they overcook you will get mush and tomato juice.

In a blender or food processor, combine roasted vegetables, whole peeled tomatoes, garlic, lime juice, cilantro, cumin, salt, and pepper. Pulse to chop and combine, making sure not to overwork mixture. After about 4-8 pulses, check consistency. If you prefer a thinner salsa, add reserved tomato juice.

I grew up in Southern California, so Mexican food has always been one of my favorites. This salsa is extremely mild, so it’s a good choice if you’re trying Mexican food for the first time. It’s also tasty over baked whitefish or sole.

Peel the tomatoes by bringing a large saucepan of water to a boil and filling a large bowl with ice water. Dip your tomatoes into the boiling water until the skins crack and loosen – about 30-60 seconds. Remove the tomatoes from the pot and place in the bowl of ice water to cool. Peel and chop your tomatoes once they are cool enough to handle.

Holly is a wine and cheese lover, recipe creator, shopping enthusiast and self appointed foodie. Her greatest passion is creating in the kitchen and making deliciously comforting recipes for the everyday home cook!

Also, for those who are too lazy to put on gloves to cut chile peppers, you can always use a fork and knife, as if you were cutting them to eat them. That’s how they do it in Mexico. Just a note: they don’t even cut them with their bare hands down there, so don’t try it at home!

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