“fresh salsa recipe roma tomato fresh tomatillo salsa recipe rick bayless”

This is archetypal salsa, made from tomatoes, green chiles, cilantro, and lime. But more than a mere mix of ingredients, salsa de molcajete uses centuries-old techniques to combine flavors, bringing out the best of each.

The USDA says the only change you can safely make in this salsa recipe is to change the amount of spices and herbs. Do not alter the proportions of vegetables to acid and tomatoes because it might make the salsa unsafe. Do not substitute vinegar for the lemon juice.

Just a caution, you can’t simply take fresh salsa and stick it in the freezer, you do need to cook it down first.  The longer you let your salsa simmer, the more liquid will evaporate and the thicker your salsa will get.  If you want to speed up the process, add a can or two of tomato paste during the cooking process.

“I grow a wide variety of tomatoes and hot peppers in my garden every year for the sole purpose of making this recipe. The measurements aren’t exact, i.e. I use the eyeball/taste test method of cooking, but it always comes out great even if it is a little different each time.”

I made this today and it was my first time making salsa to can. Did not have 8 lbs. of ripe toms so settled for 5, some were not fully ripe and I did add some tomatillos. I took the time to drain some of the fluid off and the results was nice firm tomatoes. Didn’t take the time to skin them either and they cooked up fine and did not in any way detract from the texture or taste. I love lime so, while I did use fresh lime juice from limes, I also added a bit of concentrated lime powder to give it a kick without adding fluid. I didn’t cook it for as long as suggested as it seemed to cook fairly quickly and I didn’t wanted it to be too mushy. Final touch was a bit more cilantro. Since I had hot chill peppers and jalapeño peppers from my garden I didn’t stint with those either…… it is fantastic. Thank you Jothan for providing such a great recipe that I could tweak to our tastes.

I always make salsa as an afterthought and, as you said above, using fresh tomatoes always leaves a watery texture; it’s something I’ve always just shrugged off as a normal salsa “thing”. But with fire roasted tomatoes… Yes! Tomatoes are out of season here at the moment, but I may just try it with red bell peppers as a substitute!

Thanks Cheryl. Glad you loved the salsa. Like you said, the recipe is pretty mild, but that way it’s a safe bet for all. I tend to add more jalapeños myself too, but the baseline recipe is a winner. Thanks for the comment. Come back again and try some other Bald Gourmet treats.

I used fresh grape tomatoes, green small tomatoes and roma tomatoes from my garden and it was sooo good. Seriously addictive. I’m happy I found this, thank you. I made it twice in the last month now and Im ashamed to say I have ate 1-2 jars in one week. It makes almost 3 jars every time for me using 3 pounds.

Brad really doesn’t measure any of the ingredients, but I’m going to give you estimates of the amount of ingredients you’ll need and you can go from there. If you don’t like an ingredient that we use, just leave it out. If there is something that you really like that we didn’t use, throw it in. You’ll want to go light on the seasoning at first. After you’ve processed the veggies, you’ll want to give the salsa a taste and then you can always add more seasoning to get the taste just right.

Remove the jars once processed to a towel on your counter to dry. Away from cold drafts. The jars will make little tingy popping sounds as they seal. Music to my ears! The lid tops have a raised part that depresses when they seal. Leave the jars alone until they are room temperature. The seals need time to set. It’s not recommended to move hot sealed jars.

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also hss several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

Tomatoes – about 15 lbs (yes, quite a few – you remove the skins, seeds and a lot of the water, so it takes a lot to start.) You’ll need about 3 quarts of prepared chopped tomatoes. This makes about 8 pints of salsa! If you only want to make a single jar, see this page instead!

Freezer salsa may not look as fresh and perky as fresh salsa, but it’s definitely a viable alternative to canning. There will be some watery liquid after it’s thawed.  It’s really not a big deal.  If you want to serve the salsa for chip dipping, simply drain off the liquid.  If you’re using the salsa in a cooked recipe, just use as is.

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i stumbled across this and was drawn to the natural ingredients, but is so expensive to make, i usually make salsa with jarred tomatoes but i went to trader joes and got three pounds of tomatoes to make this, it just didn’t taste that great to be honest, it tasted very fresh but not really like salsa like i’m used to, and mine was also a pinker color

Arrange the tortillas in a stack and cut into 6 equal wedges. Pour about 1-inch of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat to 350 degrees F on a deep-fat frying thermometer. Fry just a few at a time, turning occasionally, until crisp and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels; sprinkle lightly with salt, if desired. Store in an airtight container.

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  • My mom and I love your salsa! We would like to jar it because our garden has produced some much this year and we’d like to be able to enjoy it year around! If we do jar it, do we need to add vinegar or some type of preservative? We noticed that when we made it, it lost it’s power after about a week. Have you ever jarred it before?
    If you are canning salsa, is important to use recipes that are formulated and tested for safe home canning. Salsa recipes for water bath canning must meet acidity-level requirements to prevent the growth of botulism bacteria. This recipe is from the “Zesty Salsa” recipe in the Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving. The only differences between the recipe below and the “Zesty Salsa” recipe is this recipe is cut in half. The ratio of ingredients is the same and maintains the proper acidity level required for safe canning.
    I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be making it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.
    Great texture (not runny) and great taste. Everyone that I’ve had try it says it’s the best salsa they have ever had. I make as is, however if it want it extra hot I add 1T ground habanero powder to the whole batch. I just ate my last jar today so thank goodness my tomatoes have finally started ripening! Thank you for sharing this recipe.

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