“fresh salsa recipe hot easy salsa recipe fresh tomatoes blender”

This recipe is hands-down my favorite salsa! I had 1/2 pint leftover, so I put that in the fridge & had to try it right away. So yummy!! I definitely plan on making more of this! Kids & hubby loved it too! Thanks for posting!

Tags: Canning Recipes, Chilies, Cilantro, Garlic, Gourmet Garden, Home Canning and Food Preservation, Mexican Recipes, Onions, Peppers, Recipes, Tomato Early Girl, Tomato Garden, Tomato Recipes, Tomatoes, Vinegar

This Fresh Tomato salsa recipe will require  a lot of chopping. I recommend chopping the tomatoes by hand. The onions and peppers can go into a food processor to save you time and tears. If you don’t have a food processor, consider mine. Dave just bought me this Cuisinart 14 cup food processor. I LOVE it!

As I mentioned above, I picked up the Missions Organics Tortilla Chips and all of the ingredients for my homemade salsa at my local Kroger in Charlottesville. You can use the store locator to find the chips in your area, and be sure to check out the additional recipe ideas as well. They’ve got Tequila and Cheese Nachos as well as Chimichurri Steak Tacos! Oh my YUM.

If you are going to grill or broil the tomatoes, I recommend coring them first. Grilling is best with whole plum tomatoes; grill them on high direct heat until blackened in parts and the peels are cracked.

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

Use a ladle to fill the hot jars with the hot salsa, leaving ¼ inch head space. Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. Make sure the jars are fully submerged under water with several inches of water above them. Remove the jars and let them rest undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.

Hi Erin. I believe Romero peppers are real sweet, aren’t they? Aneheims are more like a mildly spicy green bell pepper. The Romeros will probably be just fine, but will make the salsa a little sweeter, which may not be a bad thing. A closer substitute would probably be poblano peppers or yellow wax/hungarian peppers. But the nice thing about salsa is that you can use any peppers you like….just keep the quantity measurements the same when canning.

Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.

I made this recipe over the weekend – my first attempt at salsa. It’s fantastic. I ended up using green peppers because that’s what I had in my garden. The half-pint that I didn’t process starts with a mild sweet taste, followed by the pepper kick. Thanks for sharing this, along with easy steps to follow.

Best home canned salsa I have ever had!! My garden tomatoes have been put to good use. Thank you so much for seeking out the recipe and tweaking it for the rest of us. I will now have to look and see what else you have tucked into your pages! I love to cook and try new recipes, so looks like a good site for me!

1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

I made a double batch last night and my husband can’t get over how delicious this recipe is! It truly IS thick!! I am in the middle of another batch only this time I tripled it. That way I should be done for a year. Thank you SO much for sharing this recipe and taking the time to experiment to find that “just right” recipe! I really appreciate it!

Freezer salsa may not look as fresh and perky as fresh salsa, but it’s definitely a viable alternative to canning. There will be some watery liquid after it’s thawed.  It’s really not a big deal.  If you want to serve the salsa for chip dipping, simply drain off the liquid.  If you’re using the salsa in a cooked recipe, just use as is.

I’d say it is mild to medium. You can definitely taste it for spiciness while cooking to judge the spiciness. During cooking the spiciness will just distribute more evenly and blend in better, so you’re not just getting heat when you bite on a piece of hot pepper.

The best way to peel tomatoes is to get a large pot of water boiling and then place the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds.  (Some suggest placing them in ice water next, but that isn’t necessary for this recipe)  When you remove the tomatoes from the boiling water their skins will start to split (you may need to assist them by piercing them with the tip of a knife) and they can then be easily peeled.

Bring a large pot of water to a rapid boil. Carefully drop the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds them remove. Peel the skins and squeeze the seeds to remove them along with excess water. Place the tomatoes in a colander to drain. Chop the tomatoes.

Drop 4 or 5 tomatoes at a time into the boiling water. Wait 2 minutes then remove from water using a slotted spoon. Slip the skins off (set them aside to make tomato powder), place tomatoes in a colander, and repeat until all tomatoes have been skinned. Discard water.

Try sliceing tomatoes and layering them in a colinder with salt between each layer. Let sit over night in a cool place (not in the frig.) covered with a cloth. Try an outside sink so the juice gets away from the tomatoes, then proceed with yoiur favoriate recipe.

Plus, tomatoes, at least, are healthier when cooked because heat releases the lycopene. So I’m more than happy to preserve fresh produce in my canner when it’s salsa, of which we can never have too much. (If you’d like to know more about fermentation, however, HERE is an amazing eCourse on the subject with almost 2 dozen multimedia lessons.)

I made over 20 pints of this last year with a huge 10 dollar apple box full of tomatoes. This recipe was SO good. Really the best homemade salsa I have ever, ever had. I was just finding it again for this year. I’ll definitely print it out so I don’t lose it. The one tip I would give is to have extra jalapenos on hand, in case you want it hotter. I was worried about it being too hot last year, and it ended up not being quite hot enough. It was still super good though.

55 Comments 10 ingredients or less, 15 minutes or less, Appetizer, Dairy-Free, Dip, Gluten Free, Grain-Free, Mexican-Inspired, No Bake, Nut-Free, Oil-Free, One Bowl, Recipes, Refined Sugar-Free, Sauce, Savory, Snacks, Soy-Free, Spring, Summer, Vegan

Canning jars (pint size, wide mouth), includes lids and rings 9 jars $8.00/dozen Grocery stores, like Publix, Kroger and Safeway and local “big box” stores; sometimes Big Lots and even hardware stores $6.00

Individually chop all the peppers, onions, garlic, and cilantro and put them in a large bowl. A food processor comes in real handy here, but you can do it by hand as well. The processor helps, because I like my salsa pretty smooth, but you can make it chunky style too, that just depends on your personal preference.

“Salsas are usually mixtures of acid and low-acid ingredients; they are an example of an acidified food. The specific recipe, and sometimes preparation method, will determine if a salsa can be processed in a boiling water canner or a pressure canner. A process must be scientifically determined for each recipe. ”

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The Spanish name for this salsa means “rooster’s beak,” and originally referred to a salad of jicama, peanuts, oranges, and onions. But today, whether you’re in Minneapolis or Mexico City, if you ask for pico de gallo, you’ll get the familiar cilantro-flecked combination of chopped tomato, onion, and fresh chiles. This tart, crisp condiment (also known as salsa Mexicana) has become so common on Mexican tables that it seems like no coincidence that its colors match those of the national flag. Besides finding firm ripe tomatoes and seeding them, the key to this salsa is adding plenty of lime juice and salt, and not skimping on the chiles. Because without a burst of acidity and heat, you’re just eating chopped tomatoes.

Look for large juicy tomatoes when you make salsa. Removing the seeds is easy with a small spoon. Hold the quartered tomato over a bowl to catch the seeds and juice as you scoop them out, and use it in the salsa if you like.

Just like it sounds: wash your hands then squeeze each tomato and use your finger or a spoon to scoop and shake out most of the seeds.  You don’t need to get fanatical about it; removing just most will do. Another way to do it is to cut each tomato in half, across it, instead of lengthwise. Then just shake the seeds and juice out.

A large garden harvest can give you many batches of salsa. Why not set some aside in fancyjars for gifts? Salsa is very easy to can. It can sit on your shelf all year and be handy for a quick gift for a family member, friend or coworker.

Hi Kate. I have not. This is the way my mother taught me to do it and she canned this way for over 50 years. The steam sterilizes them, but boil them in your canner if your more comfortable with that. Either way works I’m sure. Hope you enjoy the salsa!

I followed Cassie’s idea with roasting the tomatoes briefly in oven for 18 minutes. Skin slipped right off. Microwaved half a dozen ears of corn, 3 minutes per ear, sliced off the kernels from the cob and added to the mix. Next year I will roast on the grille to see how that changes the taste. This is a nice mild to medium basic recipe you can tweet in so many ways.

One Comment

  • Hi Martha. I haven’t tried, but I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t use green tomatoes. It’s my understanding that green have more acidity than red, so safety shouldn’t be a concern. They are obviously more sour, not being ripe, so you may have to adjust the sugar content accordingly. You may be able to skip the “draining” step as well, being that green tomatoes have less water in them than red rip ones do. Before you bottle and process, taste the batch and adjust your sugar and spices from there. The taste after cooking should be pretty much the same as after processing. Anyhow, if you give it a try, let me know how it turns out. I’m curious to know.
    Note that it is the vinegar in the salsa ingredients that make this salsa safe for canning using a water bath canning method. Tomatoes are already slightly acidic, and only need a little more acid to be safely canned using this method. But the chiles are not acidic, so they need more vinegar.

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