“fresh salsa recipe canned tomatoes healthy fresh mango salsa recipe”

Work does tend to get in the way of gardening, doesn’t it? I have salsa issues in my garden. When my cilantro is prime, my tomatoes are just beginning to flower. By the time I have tomatoes, my cilantro has all dried up. I think I’ll try late planting cilantro this year to see if I can synchronize them. So many plans, so little space, so little time.

Hi Theresa. Yes, you can double or triple the recipe for a larger batch. This recipe takes more time than others, but is so worth the effort. You picked a good one to start canning with. I hope you enjoy the results!

Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!

Yo preparé una salsa. Fue muy picante y muy bueno. Fue salado y dulce pero se ve delicioso. Tenia bueno sabor. El jalapeño y los pimientos son muy picantes. Yo encanta la comida picante y la salsa. Mi salsa es mas jugoso que mi amigo Will salsa. Salsa es bueno para fiestas. Salsa es mas cremoso que otro salsa.

You will benefit from a canning funnel and essentials when filling your jars. They are just a few dollars, last forever and are infinitely handy in the kitchen for filling canning jars and freezer bags.

Coarsely chop the tomatoes, then place in a large colander set in sink, and allow to stand for 30 minutes. This will allow much of the tomato juice to strain out (place the colander over a large bowl if you wish to save the juice for something else).

I made your salsa last year and it was awesome. For us here on the East Coast of Canada, we found that it required a little too much lime juice, but it turned out sooo good and I have had so many compliments. Thank you. Lillian

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also hss several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

This is almost the same as my recipe. I’m from Nicaragua, and one thing they add there which I love doing is adding little bit of white vinegar. After letting the salsa sit for about 5 minutes, it tastes amazing! I usually use the cap of the vinegar container to measure and make sure I don’t add too much.

As far as the salsa goes, you do not need to add the honey if you want to leave that out. The sweetness helps to cut the acidity of the tomatoes a little bit, but it’s not necessary (especially if you’re using sweet tomatoes)! 🙂

But I must say that this recipe is one of the cleanest, most satisfying salsas that I have ever had. I tasted it for the first time about 5 years ago at a baptism and quickly beggedasked for the recipe.

Yet the term did not appear in the American lexicon until the early 1960s. The squash seeds are gone and the beans are less common, but this juggernaut of culinary versatility comes in styles to serve every palate.

I’m making this for the third time today. I fiddled with the peppers a little on each batch, as I have a few madly productive poblano plants this year. Given your mention of adjustments to the original recipe and my own subsequent pepper shenanigans, I let each of the first two batches sit for a few weeks after canning and then checked ph, and I’m pleased to report that both batches were unambiguously acidic enough for HWB canning. Oh, and delicious. I mean, really delicious, to the point where it’s difficult to express how good this salsa is without resorting to profanity. 200lbs and counting of tomatoes from the garden this year, and this is easily the biggest hit out of all experiments so far. Thank you!

1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

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Either works equally well. The salsa mix for canning has the advantage of being tested and easy. It’s basically corn starch, onion powder, salt and seasoning. It doesn’t have any preservative to improve the canning, so the advantage is only that it is easier.  However, I like my custom-made from fresh seasonings better, so here is the recipe for that:

Just wondering if you can use jalapenos instead of serrano peppers. Also, can you not use canned plum tomatoes if they have the white lining? I think this counteracts the metallic taste. And…no garlic?

We used six tomatoes of varying size and shape. One of those tomatoes is pretty crazy looking and had some yucky part that had to be cut off. Even though we are going to put the veggies in the food processor, we give them a little chop. Do what you like, but I know it works well doing it our way. 😉

Oh man, my aunt taught me to make a mean fresh salsa (she’s Mexican) and ever since I have such a hard time enjoying anything from the store. I never thought to use canned tomatoes though. Great tip for getting through the winter!

Something that might help cut the process of “cooking down the tomatoes” time. One day while searching for something to store chopped tomatoes in till I was ready to make and can my mother in laws bbq sauce “en masse” early the next morning, my eyes fell on my sun tea jug. I dumped the tomatoes inside and promptly filled both sun tea jugs that I had and set both in the fridge overnight. The next morning I had floating pulp and inspiration hit …. since the water boils off anyhow, why not cut out the proverbial “middle man” and drain off that water before (!) I started the cooking process??!!! You talk about making a huge difference in the amount of time! Wow! The flavor did not change and it still had some cooking time to it to cook off the liquid from the onions and peppers I’d added to it. And then I hit upon an idea to keep me from being tied to the stove to stir, stir, stir … my crockpot with the lid cocked to the side did an excellent job and I only had to stir occasionally, I canned 10 pints of thick bbq sauce last year and so far this year, 24 quarts of tomatoes. I have more than enough tomatoes to make a couple batches of your salsa. I will be using the same “liquid removal trick” and “crockpot cooking trick”. Give the trick a try, anything that frees you up to make more yummy salsa is a good thing!

This is the perfect salsa for dipping tortilla chips, Frito chips, or even kale chips! It would also make a delicious addition to things like our Mexican Quinoa Salad Cups, Black Bean Butternut Squash Enchiladas, Best Damn Vegan Nachos, Sweet Potato Kale Chip Nachos, or Plantain Black Bean Tacos.

Awesome Barb! Glad it turned out so good. I do love this salsa recipe. Your modification ideas sound pretty good too. As for shelf life, I got the base for this recipe in a Better Homes and Gardens book, and mostly just modified the spices and such, so I would say its pretty safe. I’m still eating mine a year after it was canned and I haven’t killed myself off yet! You should be good for a year as well too.

On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

Before meeting Gloria I assumed that salsa or picante sauce would be too difficult and time consuming to prepare at home. How wrong I was! I´m forever grateful to Gloria for generously sharing her family recipe with us, and thus with all of you.

I too often forget the air bubble step. You and I should be fine, but it is a better practice to make sure you get the air out, as this could affect the headspace while processing, thus affecting the amount of processing time required to get all the air out. This recipe includes an extra 5 minutes processing time just in case anyway, so you’ll likely be fine with the jars you forgot on. Just try to do on your next batch.

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also has several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

This recipe is, hands down the most delicious salsa I have ever made and one of the most delicious I have ever tasted. It is truly thick and not runny, which was exactly what I was looking for. I didn’t change anything in the recipe, nor will I in the future. (except I doubled the recipe) I had planned to give most of them away as Christmas gifts, but instead I gave away more of hot pickled carrots and kept a lot of these for my family!

This was the first time I have made Salsa. I have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so was searching for recipes. Can’t tell you how many I looked at before I found this one! The thickness of the Salsa is what appealed to me. I was not disappointed! This is an excellent salsa. Time consuming but worth it. I’m a beginner and I’m sure it will be faster next time. My only regret: not enough ripe tomatoes to double the recipe. I got 6 pints and it won’t last long! Next time I plan to add a little more heat. Thanks for the great recipe!

Wash tomatoes. Remove stems and cores with a knife. Bring at least 4 inches of water to a boil in a large kettle. Immerse tomatoes, a few at a time, into boiling water for about a minute, or until the skins start to crack and peel off the flesh. Immediately dip tomatoes into cold water, and drain in a colander. Slip off the skins, and discard. Coarsely chop the tomatoes; place in a large colander set in sink, and allow to stand for 30 minutes. This will allow much of the tomato juice to strain out. (place the colander over a large bowl if you wish to save the juice for something else)

Hmmmm…I’ve never minded the vinegar flavor if it was evident, but maybe it was just different for me. ?? Is it possible that the peppers and tomatoes were measured before chopping finely instead of after? That would explain both the low quantity and the high vinegar, wrong ratio.

This looks like a great salsa recipe I’ve made salsa in the past and canned it. It was really nice having salsa on hand to enjoy. In the recent past, I’ve gotten into making uncooked salsa that we really like but it would be nice to have a few jars sitting on the shelf ready to go. The homemade salsa is so much better too.

One Comment

  • Excellent, simple salsa recipe! Fresh, in-season produce make all the difference and are absolutely critical in achieving a good outcome. There is no way this is flavorless unless flavorless ingredients were used. Tastes better the longer it sits. HIGHLY recommend!
    As if you needed any more good news, this homemade salsa can be prepared in about 5 minutes at any time of year! In the summer it’s delicious with seasonally ripe tomatoes, peppers, and herbs, but it’s also easy to make in the off-season with a can of tomatoes and canned chilies. Don’t let the weather stop you from enjoying fresh chips and salsa whenever a craving strikes…
    Thanks Theresa. People have been canning with your mom’s method for many years. And it probably does work well for your family. But it is not a recommended as safe process from the food safety police as it provides for a chance of bacteria growth in your canned jars. For legal reasons, I can’t recommended any process not blessed by the local food extensions. Sure you understand that. But I appreciate you sharing with me.

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