“fresh salsa recipe bbc goodfood simple fresh salsa recipe”

My husband and I have been using this recipe for our canned salsa for three years now. Your recipe is easy to follow and delicious. Our friends and family love the salsa as do we and I would never dream of looking for a different recipe. It’s perfect! Thanks for posting it!!

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This recipe comes at the perfect time. My tomatoes are just about ripe and I was just looking in my canning cookbooks tonight for a salsa recipe and didn’t find one I liked. Can’t wait to try this one!

Hi Martha. I haven’t tried, but I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t use green tomatoes. It’s my understanding that green have more acidity than red, so safety shouldn’t be a concern. They are obviously more sour, not being ripe, so you may have to adjust the sugar content accordingly. You may be able to skip the “draining” step as well, being that green tomatoes have less water in them than red rip ones do. Before you bottle and process, taste the batch and adjust your sugar and spices from there. The taste after cooking should be pretty much the same as after processing. Anyhow, if you give it a try, let me know how it turns out. I’m curious to know.

On taco night, my husband polishes off half of a 16 oz. jar of “HOT” salsa all by himself. My daughter eats it with her spoon if we tell her she’s cut off on tortillas chips. Did I mention she’s only two years old?

I doubled this recipe for a crowd. Made the following modifications: 1. Doubled the garlic. 2. Omitted sugar. 3. Added half of a ripe fresh pineapple, trimmed & cored. (I used this amount for the doubled recipe, so just 1/4 for the regular recipe.) 4. Threw all ingredients in the food processor (did not pre-chop much)and whirled it around until it was salsa-like. I got RAVE reviews on this salsa & it’s so wonderfully fresh. After the pineapple, the doubled recipe yielded about 6 cups.

Some tomatoes are lingering on my kitchen counter. And would you look there? Some beautiful peppers just showed up by way of a generous co-worker enjoying a rich bounty. The stage is set to whip up a homemade batch of what is arguably America’s most popular condiment. Ketchup? Nope. We’re talking a homemade salsa recipe!

You did forget one important detail however in the sanitizing.. YOU HAVE TO SANITIZE THE LIDS, and do not touch the rubber part of the lid as your oils in your skin will cause it to be unusable. I have canned for years, as does my mother in law.. I would not hesitate to can ANYTHING, meat or veggie.. 🙂 Just remember to sanitize the jars and lids!!

Ha! Thanks for such a great comment Cassandra. I know what you mean about the profanity description. I seem to swear every time I crack open a jar. Thanks for the laugh. 200 pounds and counting? You have been a very busy bee this year!

To keep the corn from drying out on the grill, soak the ears in water first. You can grill the corn and bell peppers at the same time, but check the peppers earlier, since they cook faster. The salsa is great as an appetizer or as a topping for grilled meats, fish, or poultry.

made a double batch and it is a too vinegary? Is there a way to fix or does it need to sit longer, canned 6 days ago? I have enough ripe tomatoes and peppers to do another double batch but don’t want it to be too vinegary too.

This is the perfect salsa for dipping tortilla chips, Frito chips, or even kale chips! It would also make a delicious addition to things like our Mexican Quinoa Salad Cups, Black Bean Butternut Squash Enchiladas, Best Damn Vegan Nachos, Sweet Potato Kale Chip Nachos, or Plantain Black Bean Tacos.

One Comment

  • Did you know the hottest part of peppers are the white ribs or membranes (pith) on the inside of the peppers. They’re hotter than the seeds. The more of the ribs you leave on, the hotter the salsa will be. The seeds will add some spiciness since they’ve been rubbing against the pith. If you like your salsa on the mild side, cut out the white part on the inside and remove all the seeds.
    karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don’t enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.
    Making and canning your own salsa is something families remember years later.  No store bought salsa, even if it is shipped from Texas, compares with the taste of that made from your own tomatoes from your garden or fresh-picked from a local farm!  In the middle of the winter, you can have tortilla chips and your salsa and taste the summer flavor of fresh tomatoes. If you like cilantro in your salsa, see this recipe instead.

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