“fresh salsa recipe bbc goodfood fresh mango salsa recipe”

If you’re all about the tomatoes in your fresh salsa, then this recipe is for you. With only a few other ingredients added (chile peppers, onion, cilantro, and lime juice) this fresh salsa recipe has lots of sweet and refreshing tomato flavor.

[…] For one thing, salsa is serious business around here. I may have mentioned my Tostitos addiction at some point? And runny food processor made salsa is not going to cut it. I’m sorry, it’s just not. This recipe is the best homemade salsa EVER. […]

[…] posts you’ll find on this website: Tomato Jam Canning Crushed, Diced or Chopped Tomatoes Freezer Salsa Fresh Salsa or Pico de Gallo Canning Posts include: Three Canning Tools You Need Sterilizing and […]

Well, our CSA farmer offered us a TON about 120 pounds of tomatoes (see the beautiful mix of reds, yellows and oranges in the bowl?) this past weekend, and me, being the glutton for bulk kitchen anything accepted his offer.

[…] book club friends pretty much agreed, this book was a stinker, but the food was good. I served my homemade garden salsa, Cilantro Jalapeno Hummus and Trader Joe’s guacamole for an appetizer {good stuff}. The […]

Getty Stewart is an engaging speaker and writer providing tasty recipes, time-saving tips, and helpful kitchen ideas to make home cooking easy and enjoyable. She is a Professional Home Economist, author of Manitoba’s best-selling Prairie Fruit Cookbook, Founder of Fruit Share, mom and veggie gardener.  Get Getty in your kitchen, at your conference or your community center today.

I have just made this in advance for tonight to serve with burritos. I also increased lime to 2T, added a pinch of ground cumin and halved the sugar to 1/2tsp. I also added cucumber as I like the cool flavor it lends to the dish. Tasting it now it was lovely, I’m sure by tonight it’ll be magnificent!

Tomatoes are a borderline acid / low acid fruit (see this page about tomato acidity for more information) – adding lemon juice helps, processing according to the specified times (determined by the USDA) in the water bath canner almost eliminates spoilage.  You should boost the acid level of the sauce, by adding 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid per quart of sauce. (or half that, for pint jars)

Treat it like you would any other opened salsa. The Eat By Date website recommends 5-7 days for homemade salsa and 1-2 weeks for commercial jarred salsa that has been opened. I would aim for 7 days max.

I am very excited to try this recipe. I, too, have made several batches of “runny” salsa; I like the thick stuff! I’m going to have a bumper crop of great tomatoes, so I will be busy! Thanks for the recipe!

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

We used six tomatoes of varying size and shape. One of those tomatoes is pretty crazy looking and had some yucky part that had to be cut off. Even though we are going to put the veggies in the food processor, we give them a little chop. Do what you like, but I know it works well doing it our way. 😉

This is a really delicious BASIC salsa recipe. I have no idea why anyone would say it tastes disgusting. You have to make sure you have fresh ingredients though, particularly, fresh, and tasty, tomatoes. You can’t make tasty salsa without tasty ingredients! I use a jalepeno (and remove some of the seeds for my kids) and extra garlic every time. Salt plentifully. We serve it with everything Mexican – tonight chicken enchiladas, but also with carnitas tacos, chicken/steak fajitas. Love it!

If you’ve never attempted home preserving methods you need a good reference book. ‘Putting food by’ is my go to overall home preserving book. Putting Food By needs to be in the cupboard of every new home preserver. It covers Everything! Freezing, root cellaring, drying, it’s in there! Recipes too!

First up, our superfast Black-Eyed Pea and Tomato Salsa comes together quickly. Adding the inner veins and seeds from the poblano chile will increase the heat in this salsa. Serve with tortilla chips for a fresh, summery appetizer.

It is safe to freeze fresh, uncooked salsa, but I wouldn’t recommend it. The texture will change leaving it quite mushy. The tomato peel would separate and be tough compared to all the other ingredients. It would be okay to add to soups or sauces but it wouldn’t be great for salsa and chips.

I have a question regarding the Anaheim peppers. I seen the internet some places rate this as a medium to hot pepper and others call it a mild pepper. I’m not a fan of hot or spicy peppers but I like the flavor of some. Is there a good substitute that is not as hot?

Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot, but I do like to food process from smallest to largest as far as ending size of the pieces. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste (in glass jars to avoid BPA!) and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!

6 Blend salsa if you want it to be more smooth: If you want your salsa to be more smooth than chunky, use an immersion blender to pulse it a few times, or working in batches ladle about half of it into a blender and purée.

Hi Jenn, with only a tablespoon of sugar in the entire batch I have no idea why it would have been too sweet. It may just seem sweet because it wasn’t hot and perhaps hot salsas are what you’re used to? The heat factor is related to the jalapenos – did you see the recipe note about the membranes? That’s where they heat lies so if you want a hot salsa leave the membranes intact. Be sure also to use the freshest jalapenos you can find, otherwise they tend to lose some of their heat.

Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ button on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.

In a blender or food processor, combine roasted vegetables, whole peeled tomatoes, garlic, lime juice, cilantro, cumin, salt, and pepper. Pulse to chop and combine, making sure not to overwork mixture. After about 4-8 pulses, check consistency. If you prefer a thinner salsa, add reserved tomato juice.

This is the time of summer where the gardens are getting full of fresh veggies.  If you are wondering what to do with all of those garden veggies make this salsa ASAP!   This salsa uses 7 cups of fresh tomatoes and is full of such amazing flavor.

I have a question. I noticed from the pictures that the tomatoes when cooked look like the consistency of tomato sauce, no chunks …..however in your last picture of the finished product there is lots of tomato chunks (my kinda salsa) – how is this done?

1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

In ten minutes, you’ll collect the necessary ingredients right from the plants in your garden. In another ten minutes, you will be putting the finishing touches on homemade garden salsa that will surely impress your guests, not to mention save you at least a couple bucks at the grocery store.

©Holly Nilsson for SpendWithPennies.com. Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any social media is strictly prohibited. Please view my photo use policy here.

Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place (usually takes overnight)  You can then remove the rings if you like, but if you leave them on, at least loosen them quite a bit, so they don’t rust in place due to trapped moisture. Once the jars are cool, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sucked down. Just press in the center, gently, with your finger. If it pops up and down (often making a popping sound), it is not sealed. If you put the jar in the refrigerator right away, you can still use it. Some people replace the lid and reprocess the jar, then that’s a bit iffy. If you heat the contents back up, re-jar them (with a new lid) and the full time in the canner, it’s usually ok.

I used Roma tomatoes. 3 or 4 lbs of the little ones would have been too expensive 🙁 Really good but a little watery for my liking.. It was similar to (but still way better than) restaurant style salsa. Next time I’ll roast them first and throw half of the tomatoes and everything else in the food processor and pulse a few times before adding the rest of the tomatoes cause I want more chunky tomatoes in my salsa. I did decide to strain it and add a small can of tomato sauce to make up for the liquid and I was very happy with the result.

One Comment

  • 55 Comments 10 ingredients or less, 15 minutes or less, Appetizer, Dairy-Free, Dip, Gluten Free, Grain-Free, Mexican-Inspired, No Bake, Nut-Free, Oil-Free, One Bowl, Recipes, Refined Sugar-Free, Sauce, Savory, Snacks, Soy-Free, Spring, Summer, Vegan
    32 pints is an undertaking! Glad you like the salsa Nina. Thanks for sharing with your friends. I was making peach salsa myself. If you have a source for peaches, you may want to give it a tasty try. I posted it just the other day.
    On taco night, my husband polishes off half of a 16 oz. jar of “HOT” salsa all by himself. My daughter eats it with her spoon if we tell her she’s cut off on tortillas chips. Did I mention she’s only two years old?

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