“fresh roma salsa recipe fresh salsa recipe without tomatoes”

Homemade Salsa with fresh ingredients and full of flavor, just like the one you’re served at your favorite restaurant! This restaurant style salsa is made with roasted tomatoes and onions which enhances all the flavors. Delicious and simple!

Ha! That’s too funny! Sometimes I just see the perfect related post title from a friend and don’t even check it out b/c I know all their stuff is great. I wonder if Donielle got more or less visits b/c people though it was an odd salsa? Whoops! Glad I could give you a chuckle, anyway!

Would you say this recipe is about as hot as Medium salsa? I want decent spice without going overboard. Can I taste it for spiciness before cooking it or will there be a significant difference between the fresh salsa and cooked salsa?

Hi, just one question. Last week I canned 11 pints and it came out fantastic. But got to thinking. My batch got a little too think after the cook down. So I added a cup of water to the batch to give it a little liquid. Is that OK? I thought being drained it would be acceptable to add back a little water. Thanks again for the great recipe.

This is archetypal salsa, made from tomatoes, green chiles, cilantro, and lime. But more than a mere mix of ingredients, salsa de molcajete uses centuries-old techniques to combine flavors, bringing out the best of each.

We make salsa using our charcoal grill- just put the tomatoes, green peppers, onions, whatever you want, directly onto the hot coals. After about an hour, take them off and let them cool, then rub off the charred skin (leave some on for more smokey flavor!), put them in a food processor with some seasonings and voila! We usually roast a head (?) of garlic at the same time and throw half of it in the salsa.

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Niki, sorry for my delayed reply. I’ve been on vacation and away from connectivity. The cilantro is strictly for flavor so leave it out if you don’t like it. As for the celery, a little should be fine. Too much will change the Ph, which could mean unsafe storage. Just add a little extra lime or lemon juice to compensate.

The only sad thing about tomatoes is that they don’t last. A beautiful, ripe tomato will keep for a week at most before it goes bad. So when the comes and kills the plants, that’s the end of garden-fresh tomatoes until next year.

“We love this salsa. It is delicious. when my tomatoes are ripe, I love to make this salsa. I don’t add jalapeno peppers, I don’t like it spicy, but I do substitute green peppers. I forgot the salt once & it didn’t taste as good, I added it & it was great. Love this salsa!!!!!”

[…] For one thing, salsa is serious business around here. I may have mentioned my Tostitos addiction at some point? And runny food processor made salsa is not going to cut it. I’m sorry, it’s just not. This recipe is the best homemade salsa EVER. […]

Try sliceing tomatoes and layering them in a colinder with salt between each layer. Let sit over night in a cool place (not in the frig.) covered with a cloth. Try an outside sink so the juice gets away from the tomatoes, then proceed with yoiur favoriate recipe.

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!

Salsa may feel fairly new to the condiment scene, but this favorite has been popular for thousands of years. Salsa was even a staple in the Aztec culture, where favored recipes included squash seeds and legumes.

I also believe that roasting your tomatoes and onions gives the salsa a complexity of flavor. I prefer to roast my own tomatoes rather than buy canned roasted tomatoes. It literally only takes minutes. I like to roast the tomatoes just until they start to slightly char. I did choose canned diced chilies in this recipe only because I wanted a milder salsa with a hint of smokiness, but if you want a spicier salsa, leave out the diced chiles and roast a couple of jalapeños along with the tomatoes. Or you can even use both, totally up to you. Keep in mind though that jalapeños can range wildly in heat level, so I would try them before adding them to the salsa.

Poblanos are a popular green chile pepper from Mexico. They’re usually mild, but occasionally you’ll get a hot one. Serranos, the most common chile in Mexican cuisine, are smaller and can be bright red or green, with a bright, biting flavor. Broiling chile peppers delivers a tangible smokiness.

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Fill inexpensive, reusable glass jars with Spring Salsa and chips for easy carrying. This colorful salsa of corn, tomatoes, and cilantro would be equally delicious served over salad greens or in warm tortillas with grilled chicken.

Or I should use the plural and say “salsa-s”. Any decent Mexican dining establishment north of the border, whether a taco truck or full on restaurant will offer a variety of salsas to its patrons—tomatillo salsa verde, red chili salsa, and my favorite, a fresh tomato salsa otherwise knows as Pico de Gallo or Salsa Fresca.

One Comment

  • “Salsas are usually mixtures of acid and low-acid ingredients; they are an example of an acidified food. The specific recipe, and sometimes preparation method, will determine if a salsa can be processed in a boiling water canner or a pressure canner. A process must be scientifically determined for each recipe. ”
    Good question Nancy. You will have better results using fresh tomatoes instead of canned. The canned tomatoes may not hold their texture well and not produce a thick and chunky salsa texture. You can use store bought Roma tomatoes instead of fresh garden tomatoes. They won’t taste as good of course, but will still do the trick.
    This is almost the same as my recipe. I’m from Nicaragua, and one thing they add there which I love doing is adding little bit of white vinegar. After letting the salsa sit for about 5 minutes, it tastes amazing! I usually use the cap of the vinegar container to measure and make sure I don’t add too much.
    I tried this recipe for the first this year (and also my first time canning food). I followed the instructions but I only got one jar and a half (1L jar though). Is that normal? If not, what did I did wrong? The taste is very good though. I just wish I could have more cans of salsa!

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