“fresh peach salsa recipe without tomatoes fresh tomato salsa recipe food processor”

[…] you have a kitchen drowning in tomatoes and peppers, making salsa makes sense! I have  Fresh Tomato salsa recipe  I made last year. This year I wanted another recipe, more Pace Picante, with no cilantro. I […]

You’ll love the fresh ingredients and bright flavor in our Tomatillo Salsa. Serve it as a topper for Chicken Enchiladas or as a tasty appetizer with tortilla chips. Feel free to cut down on the heat by using just half of the jalapeño pepper the recipe calls for. Likewise, if you’re a fan of spice, feel free to add more. 

This salsa is a perfect summer snack! For ease, I don’t worry about seeding the tomatoes and pulse the ingredients in the food processor; if my family deems it too “juicy,” we strain off a bit of the liquid and then add the lime juice.

Prep your tomatoes by blanching them a bit first. Then put them in ice-cold water before peeling. The peels should loosen from the tomatoes. Much easier to peel tomatoes this way. Just don’t Cook the tomatoes. Keep an eye on them. If they overcook you will get mush and tomato juice.

Pour 1 can of tomatoes into a blender, and add the jalapeno pepper, onion, cilantro leaves, lemon juice, and salt. Blend until fairly smooth. Pour in the second can of tomatoes and blend briefly. Adjust seasonings to taste by adding more lemon juice and salt. Let the salsa rest for 1/2 hour before serving to allow the flavors to blend.

That said, I’ll be canning salsa again this weekend and intend to fully enjoy the finished product! Try making your own sourdough tortilla chips via the instructions at the GNOWFGLINS eCourse on sourdough (yum!).

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make and tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

Ooh, this looks sooo delicious! The idea of canning has always kinda freaked me out b/c I’m super paranoid of giving my fam botulism or something 😛 But! This looks super easy so you may have twisted my arm and now I’ll give it a try. 🙂

A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!

Making this right this very second. Following exactly to start with..except am throwing in a couple of Thai peppers along with the 4 smallish jalapenos…which I may regret…them things are supposed to be killer hot. I will say, that it is taking significantly longer than the 10 minutes prep time for the water to simmer off (step 2), but I’m in no huge hurry….I have wine.

I make a very similar recipe. Ours has a little less lime juice, and add some ACV. Also, e use canned diced tomatoes, but I think crushed might be even better. I can’t wait to try it! BTW, when do you add your cilantro? I couldn’t find that step in the recipe.

And for those of you wondering, can you use canned tomatoes? Yes. I have used fire-roasted canned, too, to supplement the tomatoes I had on hand. I just add the canned at the end of cooking down my fresh tomatoes. I even made a batch with all my left over tomatoes from saucers, beefsteaks, cherries…I throw into a food processor with skins on. We like it with all the bits of skins, too. Cuts down the time by a lot for making big batches like me!

Hmmmm…I’ve never minded the vinegar flavor if it was evident, but maybe it was just different for me. ?? Is it possible that the peppers and tomatoes were measured before chopping finely instead of after? That would explain both the low quantity and the high vinegar, wrong ratio.

I’m a Catholic wife and mother of four who wants the best of nutrition and living for her family. I believe that God calls us to be good stewards of all His gifts as we work to feed our families: time, finances, the good green earth, and of course, our healthy bodies. I’m the founder and boss lady here at Kitchen Stewardship — welcome aboard!

Chris Munn, it’s so nice to meet someone with Peruvian connections! What a treat that your wife has introduced you to so many Peruvian favorites. I’ve found that Peruvians are very proud of their cuisine and every region has their own specialties. I’m glad you found this salsa recipe. It’s simple to prepare and my favorite salsa. Thanks for coming by and leaving a meaningful comment.

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Fixed your egg and ham casserole tonight. It was a smash hit! I have been looking for a fresh salsa recipe and this sounds great! I just was wondering, do you have to use honey and why do you use honey? I’m a diabetic so I was just wondering.

I have made salsa over the years and have always just frozen the batch in individual plastic containers until ready to use. Not very interested in the canning process anymore. Any problem with doing the same with your recipe.

karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don’t enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

This garden fresh salsa recipe takes advantage of seasonal ingredients. It is so easy to make, just toss the ingredients into a food processor or blender, pulse it to the consistency you like, and enjoy.

2 Dice or pulse a few times in food processor: Place all of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse only a few times, just enough to finely dice the ingredients, not enough to purée. If you don’t have a food processor, you can finely dice by hand.

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also hss several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

The addition of olives makes this salsa a little different from other varieties. You can seed the jalapeno peppers if desired. But if you family likes salsa with some “heat”, leave them in.—Sharon Lucas, Raymore, Missouri

I never make comments on websites but I have to say that this recipe is really really good! I had to stray a bit because we did not have enough tomatoes from the garden, so I added about 30-40% roasted Tomatillos. Next time I will go and buy enough tomatoes so I can triple the recipe. This really is the best canned salsa I have ever made by a long shot! Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Dana, this recipe is amazing! Tastes better than the Lone Star restaurant chips and salsa we love and half the price! So easy to make too. Those fire roasted tomatoes really made the dish. Any Canadians here – you can find Alymer fire roasted tomatoes at Loblaws/Zehrs

Something that might help cut the process of “cooking down the tomatoes” time. One day while searching for something to store chopped tomatoes in till I was ready to make and can my mother in laws bbq sauce “en masse” early the next morning, my eyes fell on my sun tea jug. I dumped the tomatoes inside and promptly filled both sun tea jugs that I had and set both in the fridge overnight. The next morning I had floating pulp and inspiration hit …. since the water boils off anyhow, why not cut out the proverbial “middle man” and drain off that water before (!) I started the cooking process??!!! You talk about making a huge difference in the amount of time! Wow! The flavor did not change and it still had some cooking time to it to cook off the liquid from the onions and peppers I’d added to it. And then I hit upon an idea to keep me from being tied to the stove to stir, stir, stir … my crockpot with the lid cocked to the side did an excellent job and I only had to stir occasionally, I canned 10 pints of thick bbq sauce last year and so far this year, 24 quarts of tomatoes. I have more than enough tomatoes to make a couple batches of your salsa. I will be using the same “liquid removal trick” and “crockpot cooking trick”. Give the trick a try, anything that frees you up to make more yummy salsa is a good thing!

In the photos it looks like you used red onion. Is that your recommendation? And is that green pepper I see? Also, how fine do you cut the spicy peppers? I don’t want someone to get a big spicy mouthful!

Joshua and Gloria, expats living in Peru, still have a powerful connection with Mexico. Gloria, who was born in the United States to parents of Mexican descent, prepares family recipes passed down from generation to generation.

Wish I did, Tammy. We are actually going to start making some different canned marinara sauces to create the perfect sauce for The Bald Gourmet, so check back again soon. Our garden tomatoes are quite plentiful this year….

“My family begs me to make this during football season, with or without company coming over. It’s so easy to make, that I don’t mind. Use caution with the jalapeno pepper, however. I recommend using kitchen or disposable gloves. These amounts are the flavor my family likes, but you can use less or more jalapeno pepper depending on your tastes.”

I’m glad you asked Patty. I’m not a registered food expert, so it’s probably best to check with your local canning extension office regarding the safety of your salsa. However, I can say that it is very important when making home canned salsas to keep your vegetable to acid ratio the same as what the tested/verified recipe calls for. If you didn’t weigh your tomatoes, and ended up with 14 pints instead of 10, there’s a chance the acid ratio is off. However, by adding pineapple and the pineapple juice, you added additional acid to your batch so you may be just fine. Additionally, home-grown tomatoes typically have higher acid content than store bought, but it varies by breed. If in doubt, just freeze your jars of salsa until ready to use.

[…] cayenne (pictured here) and jalapeno peppers, pepper flakes or cayenne powder in Hot Pepper Jelly, Salsa, Tomato Jam, Stews, Popcorn Seasoning and tons of other recipes.  We like a bit of heat in our […]

We make salsa using our charcoal grill- just put the tomatoes, green peppers, onions, whatever you want, directly onto the hot coals. After about an hour, take them off and let them cool, then rub off the charred skin (leave some on for more smokey flavor!), put them in a food processor with some seasonings and voila! We usually roast a head (?) of garlic at the same time and throw half of it in the salsa.

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  • Thanks for the rating. I make so much of this in the summer! I think we will never eat it all, but it never lasts through until the next tomato season. This is the salsa I use in my salsa chicken recipe. It’s yummy, too. Super Easy!
    Hi, I am very excited to try this recipe but I have a question about your canning. I was very interested to see that while preparing your jars, you had them inverted in a fry pan. I have never seen this technique before as I have always boiled my jars in the water bath canner then returned them for processing after they are filled. Have you ever had any issues with chipping rims or cracking? Thanks Kate
    Fill and close the jars: Using canning tongs, remove the jars from the canner, carefully pouring the water back into the canner. Set next to the salsa in the saucepan. Turn the heat under the canner to high. Use a ladle to pour the salsa into the jars through a canning funnel, leaving 1/2-inch headspace at the top. Run a clean chopstick around the inside of the jar to dislodge any trapped air. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp paper towel. Place the lids on, and screw on the rings until just finger-tight.
    You could spend all day with a knife and cutting board to chop these many ingredients for a few jars of salsa, or you could form a new relationship with your food processor. Or maybe a neighbor who owns a food processor. Truly. Food process for salsa. It’s not going to be pretty anyway.
    This is my favorite salsa recipe! Thank you for sharing it. I has to substitute half lemon half lime today. That should be ok, right? Also, I doubled the batch and got 13 1/2 pints. Last year I also had extra than what the recipe called for. I weigh and measure everything precisely. I notice that after I strain the tomatoes and boil/simmer them that the consistency is still watery. Should I just squeeze the tomatoes after staining? This still should be ok to eat even though it made more?

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