“fresh n easy mild salsa recipe fresh green tomato salsa recipe”

Go green the next time you make salsa with this recipe featuring green tomatoes, jalapeño, avocado, and cilantro. Serve with tortilla chips as an appetizer or use as a topping for grilled chicken or fish.

I tried this recipe for the first this year (and also my first time canning food). I followed the instructions but I only got one jar and a half (1L jar though). Is that normal? If not, what did I did wrong? The taste is very good though. I just wish I could have more cans of salsa!

Nope. The tomatoes have enough liquid in them already. You want to drain them before cooking, and then cook them long to get rid of as much liquid as possible. This is what gives the end salsa such a good thick consistency. Glad you asked Lise.

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I would like to make this, although we just finished off a jar of LF (roasted) salsa and it was REAL good. The only problem would be getting tomatoes in winter, so this homemade salsa would be great. Thanks.

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

My roommates and I just made this and LOVED it! I have been looking for a simple, flavorful, and delicious salsa recipe and this is it! Thank you for this and all your recipes! I am looking forward to making this again and adding some pineapple or mango!

I have a question. I noticed from the pictures that the tomatoes when cooked look like the consistency of tomato sauce, no chunks …..however in your last picture of the finished product there is lots of tomato chunks (my kinda salsa) – how is this done?

Good question Nancy. You will have better results using fresh tomatoes instead of canned. The canned tomatoes may not hold their texture well and not produce a thick and chunky salsa texture. You can use store bought Roma tomatoes instead of fresh garden tomatoes. They won’t taste as good of course, but will still do the trick.

Rachel, you can substitute jalapeños for the serrano chiles and get great results. Try the recipe with 2 jalapeños and if the salsa is too spicy reduce it to one. Removing the seeds and veins from the chiles reduces the heat too. Cheers!

A. Well, Grandma may be sweet, but a lot of her generation died of cancer from smoking, heart attacks from eating too much saturated fat… And food poisoning! 🙂 Jam should get 5 minutes in the boiling water bath, too.

Ladle hot salsa into prepared jars, leaving a 1/2 inch of headspace. Prepare the lids according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Wipe the rims, apply lids and rings process in a water bath canner for 20 mins with 500 ml/pints at altitudes up to 1000 ft

This is my favorite salsa recipe! Thank you for sharing it. I has to substitute half lemon half lime today. That should be ok, right? Also, I doubled the batch and got 13 1/2 pints. Last year I also had extra than what the recipe called for. I weigh and measure everything precisely. I notice that after I strain the tomatoes and boil/simmer them that the consistency is still watery. Should I just squeeze the tomatoes after staining? This still should be ok to eat even though it made more?

The pressure cooking idea worked out good but would work out better if I had only made the single recipe. I didn’t drain the tomatoes while prepping them; rather, I drained them for a few minutes after coming out of the pressure cooker. Next batch I make, I’m going to cook the tomatoes in the pressure cooker for 45 minutes, drain and add all of the ingredients back into the pressure cooker(one less dirty pot is a good thing).

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I doubled this recipe for a crowd. Made the following modifications: 1. Doubled the garlic. 2. Omitted sugar. 3. Added half of a ripe fresh pineapple, trimmed & cored. (I used this amount for the doubled recipe, so just 1/4 for the regular recipe.) 4. Threw all ingredients in the food processor (did not pre-chop much)and whirled it around until it was salsa-like. I got RAVE reviews on this salsa & it’s so wonderfully fresh. After the pineapple, the doubled recipe yielded about 6 cups.

I have checked out all kinds of recipes online and your recipe is the winner I am gonna make a batch tonite I was wondering if I could use citric acid (food grade of course) instead of the lime juice and vinegar?

In this salsa from Casa del Sol in Cuidad Juárez. Mexico, the peppers are roasted and the tomatoes and onions broiled, giving the salsa a deep, roasted flavor. This salsa is traditionally mashed by hand if you decide to do the same, remember to wear gloves and don’t wipe your eyes.

Glad to see someone knows how to make salsa that tastes like salsa.Most home-made recipes usually taste like tomatoes or are nothing but spicy hot. It’s kinda like you either blasted by the tomatoes taste or burn your taste buds off. Good recipe.Of course,being a Texan I modified it just a bit for the taste I’m used to.

This looks like a great salsa recipe I’ve made salsa in the past and canned it. It was really nice having salsa on hand to enjoy. In the recent past, I’ve gotten into making uncooked salsa that we really like but it would be nice to a few jars sitting on the shelf ready to go. The homemade salsa is so much better too.

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On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

The USDA does accept that if you take an approved, tested recipe and make minor alterations to ingredients that does affect the preserving properties, that should be ok.  But there are a lot of if’s in that statement.  For example, substituting 1 teaspoon of ground chili spice for 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper is probably fine, but substituting 1 cup of apple juice for 1 cup of lemon juice would not be.  Unless you really know what you’re doing, you should probably stick to the approved recipes.  The preserving recipes I publish, like the one above, are all from the USDA, universities or established canning authorities. Granny probably never did lab cultures and bacteria counts to test that her recipe was safe; you were her test guinea pig, and that’s not as reliable as a culture (next time you might get sick)

Whether you’re looking for a tasty accompaniment for your baked chicken or grilled shrimp or planning a glorious Cinco de Mayo menu, easy salsa recipes are must-haves. (As a bonus, many of our easy salsa recipes also happen to be Healthy Living recipes!) Learn more about many of the star ingredients featured in our easy salsa recipes—like peaches, mangos, tomatoes and corn—by checking out our seasonal primer.

Preserving your own garden produce is so exciting, and makes sense financially, if you go for the long view. The initial investment pays for itself if you use the equipment.  There is no way to truly value the creative recipes you can put onto your pantry shelves, or the amazing flavor and nutrient value of home canned recipes.

The best way to peel tomatoes is to get a large pot of water boiling and then place the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds.  (Some suggest placing them in ice water next, but that isn’t necessary for this recipe)  When you remove the tomatoes from the boiling water their skins will start to split (you may need to assist them by piercing them with the tip of a knife) and they can then be easily peeled.

Also, you can separately simmer black beans with a diced white onion until the onion is completely dissolved, along with salt and pepper. Mix that half and half with the cooked salsa, as well as a couple fresh avocados and you’ll have a salsa/dip that’s incredible with blue corn chips or pretty much anything else you can think of.

Thanks for the tip. I have planted 36 roma tomato plants and many pepper plants. My family and friends are looking forward to salsa again this year. I plan on making this great recipe again. Many thanks. Lillian

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