“fresh mexican salsa recipe 2 cups tomatoes the best canned fresh salsa recipe”

This was a delicious way to use ripe tomatoes. I decided to make this at the last minute to serve with pork carnitas, rice, and tortillas. I’m so glad I did – this salsa made the meal. It had a full, robust flavor and was the perfect complement to the other items served.

It is safe to freeze fresh, uncooked salsa, but I wouldn’t recommend it. The texture will change leaving it quite mushy. The tomato peel would separate and be tough compared to all the other ingredients. It would be okay to add to soups or sauces but it wouldn’t be great for salsa and chips.

And something different: My husband probably wouldn’t let me try this one, because it’s fruit with savory and he doesn’t go for that kind of thing, but Donielle’s cherry tomato salsa looks so intriguing!

If you’ve never attempted home preserving methods you need a good reference book. ‘Putting food by’ is my go to overall home preserving book. Putting Food By needs to be in the cupboard of every new home preserver. It covers Everything! Freezing, root cellaring, drying, it’s in there! Recipes too!

Some tomatoes are lingering on my kitchen counter. And would you look there? Some beautiful peppers just showed up by way of a generous co-worker enjoying a rich bounty. The stage is set to whip up a homemade batch of what is arguably America’s most popular condiment. Ketchup? Nope. We’re talking a homemade salsa recipe!

Fixed your egg and ham casserole tonight. It was a smash hit! I have been looking for a fresh salsa recipe and this sounds great! I just was wondering, do you have to use honey and why do you use honey? I’m a diabetic so I was just wondering.

Hatch chiles are long, pointed green chiles from New Mexico that can also be red, yellow, orange, or brown when ripe. They’re only available in August and September, so if you’re a salsa fiend, buy lots, and then roast and freeze them so you can use them throughout the year. They are said to get hotter as they age, so stick with green if you want mildness. The char from broiled vegetables adds smokiness to this simple salsa.

And for those of you wondering, can you use canned tomatoes? Yes. I have used fire-roasted canned, too, to supplement the tomatoes I had on hand. I just add the canned at the end of cooking down my fresh tomatoes. I even made a batch with all my left over tomatoes from saucers, beefsteaks, cherries…I throw into a food processor with skins on. We like it with all the bits of skins, too. Cuts down the time by a lot for making big batches like me!

I really believe that salsa is best when only a few key ingredients are involved. While there are literally millions of salsa recipes, many with dozens of ingredients, I still believe in my mantra, that simple is always best. For my salsa recipe I like to stick with the key ingredients, which in my book are tomatoes, garlic, onions, cilantro, chiles or jalapeños and a little bit of lime juice for some tanginess.

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

Welcome to the Fresh Preserving newsletter! By signing up, you can expect to regularly receive news, tips, and discounts. You’ll also be among the first to receive advance notice on special promotions and new product updates. Enjoy!

The jars need to be HOT and STERILE. I run mine through the dishwasher and keep them in there hot and sterile until I fill them with HOT salsa. NEVER put cold to boiling hot into glass jars of any type. You can also use a bleach bath in the sink and exchange the water occasionally from a boiling kettle to keep them hot. Just rinse the jars before filling them.

I helped my hubby make this awesome salsa . First time salsa maker – definitely won’t be the last! His tomatoes did quite well this year and we made a double batch right away. We added some chopped pineapple and the pineapple juice, as it was a bit hot for us. My husband didn’t weigh the tomatoes and we ended up with 14 pints along with a few plastic containers. Being paranoid about food safety, is it OK that we ended up with that much and only used the required Vinegar and Lime Juice for a double batch? Also, do you think we can freeze some that we didn’t seal up? Thanks for the recipe!

Howdy! I’m Corey, and I’m so happy you’re here! This blog is full of my love of food, photography, family & friends. Have fun looking around! I hope you find a couple yummy recipes to try. Read more about the family here…

At right is a picture of tomatoes from my garden – they are so much better than anything from the grocery store. And if you don’t have enough, a pick-your-own farm is the pace to go!  At right are 4 common varieties that will work:

If you’ve been hunting for a unique salsa recipe that will dazzle taste buds, look no further. Just a few simple ingredients (grapes, bell pepper, green onions, bell pepper, lime juice, and red pepper jelly) come together to create a sweet and spicy concoction that we know you’ll love. Serve atop waffle-cut sweet potato fries, as we did here, or with your favorite hearty pita chip. 

One Comment

  • This salsa is wonderful. My husband says it’s the best he’s had. I also left the sugar in but used about half of the amount called for in the recipe. I also added a little salt and some red pepper flakes (since I had no more jalapenos).
    Hi Jeri Lou! I mentioned that step in the pictured instructions but left it out in the recipe box – it’s now added 🙂 There has been a lot of discussion about canning and bacteria in some of my other canning posts. The fact of the matter is, bacteria cannot survive or form in an airtight space. Still, it never hurts to take extra precautions.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>