“fresh medium salsa recipe easy fresh salsa recipe for canning”

2 Dice or pulse a few times in food processor: Place all of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse only a few times, just enough to finely dice the ingredients, not enough to purée. If you don’t have a food processor, you can finely dice by hand.

Thanks Theresa. People have been canning with your mom’s method for many years. And it probably does work well for your family. But it is not a recommended as safe process from the food safety police as it provides for a chance of bacteria growth in your canned jars. For legal reasons, I can’t recommended any process not blessed by the local food extensions. Sure you understand that. But I appreciate you sharing with me.

Our garden has an abundance of cherry tomatoes, so I used those coarsely chopped but unseeded. That was the only deviation I made from the recipe as given. I used one serrano pepper and one jalapeno peper, also from our garden. Declared “awesome” by my daughter-in- law. The other five people the table must have liked it too, because the salsa was gone (save a chip with the last bit of salsa, saved for me to taste)by the time I got out to the deck with my drink. The fresh tomatoes and cilantro are key. The salsa does have a bit of a kick, which we like, but if you have a group that does not like “hot” salsa, less garlic and milder peppers would be the way to go.

If it makes you feel any better, I’m a wannabe gardener as well. I have 10 garden beds, and almost all of them are doing *terribly* this year. I have a gazillion tomatoes and loads of basil, which is excellent, but not a cucumber or melon or bean in site. And peppers! Who are we kidding? No peppers. 🙁 So, you’re not alone. 🙂

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Look for large juicy tomatoes when you make salsa. Removing the seeds is easy with a small spoon. Hold the quartered tomato over a bowl to catch the seeds and juice as you scoop them out, and use it in the salsa if you like.

“Salsas are usually mixtures of acid and low-acid ingredients; they are an example of an acidified food. The specific recipe, and sometimes preparation method, will determine if a salsa can be processed in a boiling water canner or a pressure canner. A process must be scientifically determined for each recipe. ”

This was the first time I have made Salsa. I have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so was searching for recipes. Can’t tell you how many I looked at before I found this one! The thickness of the Salsa is what appealed to me. I was not disappointed! This is an excellent salsa. Time consuming but worth it. I’m a beginner and I’m sure it will be faster next time. My only regret: not enough ripe tomatoes to double the recipe. I got 6 pints and it won’t last long! Next time I plan to add a little more heat. Thanks for the great recipe!

Remove the tomatoes (from water, grill or broiler) and let cool to the touch. Remove and discard the peels. Cut away any cores if you haven’t done so already. Chop the tomatoes taking care to save any juices that may come out of them.

I truly LOVE salsa, but have never made my own. You definitely make it sound SUPER easy, though, so I should probably just give it a try! The next time that I make it to my local Farmer’s Market, I will have to pick up the ingredients that I need :).

Salsa recipes tend to use jalapeno as the hot peppers but you can experiment with varieties and taste combinations. One year our jalapeno peppers didn’t yield a crop but our hot banana peppers did so we used those instead and it tasted great.

The first year I made salsa, I used the boiling water method of removing the tomato skins. I no longer do that!! For me, the way to go is to broil the tomato halves after coring and washing at 425F for roughly 18 min

Brad has a small garden in the back yard. We have tomatoes {several different types}, jalapenos, zucchini and cantaloupe. The zucchini and cantaloupe haven’t produced yet, but we have loads of tomatoes and jalapenos.

We canned, labeled, taste tested, did follow-up surveys. We, our families, and our friends were the discerning critics for the process. Of the 6 recipes whose performance in previous canning adventures had qualified them to participate in this competition, this salsa was the clear winner!!! Every taste tester liked the salsa at each step – fresh, canned for a while, canned for a year. In fact, we had to keep back a single (hidden and disguised) bottle to use for the “canned for a year” competition. Our tasters loved this recipe so much that while there were plenty bottles of the other recipes around, this recipe was searched for every time they craved salsa. It is also very pretty in the jar; which, may be superficial, but is also satisfying at the end of the canning day!

Well, our CSA farmer offered us a TON about 120 pounds of tomatoes (see the beautiful mix of reds, yellows and oranges in the bowl?) this past weekend, and me, being the glutton for bulk kitchen anything accepted his offer.

This tomato salsa recipe for canning is packed with tomato, peppers, onions, and just enough spicy tingle to tickle your taste buds. Open a jar any time and enjoy with tortilla chips or with your favorite Mexican inspired meals.

This salsa looks delicious. I’ve been needing a yummy fresh salsa recipes if my tomatoes ever ripen 🙁 Don’t feel bad about your garden, mine hasn’t been doing well either. Except my tomato plants, but they’re too busy growing to be taller than I am instead of making me some beautiful fruit. I can hardly hold them back but I’m sure I’ll get some tomatoes soon 🙂

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Paste/Roma tomatoes work great for canning as there’s less seed & juice ( I like San Marzano, Amish Paste, Black Icicle). You can also play around with all sorts of heirloom tomatoes just remember some have higher water content and might need to be boiled down further. They will also contain more seeds to remove (although I’m sometimes lazy and leave them). 

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“My husband and I love fresh salsa, so we decided to try making our own. We just started by adding ingredients, till it tasted the way we wanted. Since then, we have been growing a SALSA GARDEN in the backyard, so we can enjoy our homemade salsa all summer long!!”

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32 pints is an undertaking! Glad you like the salsa Nina. Thanks for sharing with your friends. I was making peach salsa myself. If you have a source for peaches, you may want to give it a tasty try. I posted it just the other day.

Blanch, peel and coarsely chop tomatoes. Measure 7 cups (1750 ml). Wearing rubber gloves remove seeds and finely chop jalapenos. Combine tomatoes, onions, green pepper, jalapeno peppers, garlic, tomato paste, vinegar, cilantro and cumin in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil gently stirring occasionally until salsa reaches desired consistency, about 30 mins.

This healthy take on the traditional chips-and-salsa combo is nearly fat-free and super-refreshing. The antioxidant-rich salsa is delicious served right after it’s made, but the flavors meld nicely after a day or two in the refrigerator.

Plus, tomatoes, at least, are healthier when cooked because heat releases the lycopene. So I’m more than happy to preserve fresh produce in my canner when it’s salsa, of which we can never have too much. (If you’d like to know more about fermentation, however, HERE is an amazing eCourse on the subject with almost 2 dozen multimedia lessons.)

On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

My mouth is watering by just looking at these pictures! I will definitely going to try it this weekend. Thank you very much for the awesome recipe! Your YouTube video is so fun to watch. You deserve more subscribers and more views! Keep the awesome vides coming!

Just brilliant! Who would have thought canned tomatoes can make a mean salsa. I generally use canned tomatoes in stews and sauces and was certain that you can only make salsa with fresh tomatoes. Duh! And I see you’ve added cukes in there too…interesting! I like the sound of spicy habanero sauce but I can’t seem to find that particular aardvark brand anywhere.

The measurements are just a guide- add more or less of the specific ingredients as you prefer. So easy too- just throw everything into a food processor and let it do its thing. I’ve had this Cuisinart food processor (<–affiliate link) for years and even after many batches of nut butter grinding, it’s still going strong. This recipe makes a huge batch- plenty to fill tacos, top omelets, mix into salads and for chip dipping. Hi Carl. I wouldn’t worry too much about it. The skins won’t really hurt anything other than the texture. Skimming them off the top sounds like a good idea, but I wouldn’t worry too much if you don’t get them all. Glad you’re trying the recipe. [redirect url='http://aak1.info/bump' sec='7']

One Comment

  • {Please excuse the nasty compost bowl over to the side.} I’m adding chopped tomato, halved jalapenos and chopped onion to the food processor bowl. We used 4 small jalapenos; two seeded and two with the seeds left in. I would say we used about 1/2 cup chopped onion, a handful of fresh cilantro, 3 minced garlic cloves, 1.5-2 tsp ground cumin and about 1 tsp salt.
    Combine strawberries, mango and cantaloupe for the base of this fruit salsa, and then add some savory flavor with cucumber, bell pepper, and onion. Serve this fruit-and-veggie salsa as a side dish or a topping for grilled fish or chicken.
    Fill and close the jars: Using canning tongs, remove the jars from the canner, carefully pouring the water back into the canner. Set next to the salsa in the saucepan. Turn the heat under the canner to high. Use a ladle to pour the salsa into the jars through a canning funnel, leaving 1/2-inch headspace at the top. Run a clean chopstick around the inside of the jar to dislodge any trapped air. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp paper towel. Place the lids on, and screw on the rings until just finger-tight.
    Hi, Mary Jane, I have been searching for the type of salsa that doesn’t use tomatoes. Your description sounds like the salsa I get at my local taco truck. I would love your Gma’s recipe. Hope you’ll post to this site! And, Dana, this is very similar to the salsa I make all the time. The only difference is I put in chipotle and adobo sauce to give it an extra smokiness and kick! Thanks
    “My husband and I love fresh salsa, so we decided to try making our own. We just started by adding ingredients, till it tasted the way we wanted. Since then, we have been growing a SALSA GARDEN in the backyard, so we can enjoy our homemade salsa all summer long!!”

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