“fresh grilled corn salsa recipe fresh thick chunky salsa recipe”

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Hi! I’m Katie, and I’m the chief mess-maker around here trying to journey to better stewardship of my family’s health and the environment – while balancing a budget and limited time I mention I have 4 kids?).

This is very similar to the salsa I make. I use a combo of Anaheim and jalapenos, which I char on the stove or the grill. I also add a few splashes (I don’t measure either) of red wine vinegar, a splash of olive oil, and half a splash of liquid smoke. Almost like Chevy’s salsa.

Wash, peel, seed, and chop your ingredients first, then measure or weigh them. A kitchen scale comes in very handy when preserving the harvest. I have included both weight and cup measurements in the recipe below. Select one method of measuring and stick with it throughout the recipe so the ratio of ingredients remains the same.

I just found the recipe for fajitas on Pintrest and then it linked to this one! I was looking for some flavorful inexpensive recipes to change up the same ole same ole since money is tight this month thanks to my health problems and my many, many specialists. This site seems to be the ticket! Thanks a bushel and a peck and a hug around the neck!

Hi Tina. Good question. I don’t know about cornstarch and what that would do from a canning perspective. Older cans of tomato paste often do get a metallic taste from the can, but new/fresh cans usually do not in my experience if that helps at all.

Just tried this salsa recipe tonight. First time making salsa actually. If I had known  how easy it was and good it turn out, I should have made some much sooner. Thanks for the recipe. This is definitely a keeper.

I can lots of salsa every season. Not going to say it isn’t a lot of work. It is a labor of love. Make a big batch, no preservatives in it. You can eat it all winter long. I add black beans and corn to mine, it is lunch in a jar. It last 1 year after canning, but you will eat it up before a year goes by.

Chop the jalapeno peppers.  If you like your salsa hot, leave the white pith/membranes.  Contrary to popular belief, it’s not the seeds that are hot, it’s the white pith that surrounds them.  It’s always recommended that you use gloves while handling chili peppers.

This salsa is incredible and you are going to agree that it is the best that you have ever made!  I like a mild salsa so I suggest adding in an extra jalapeño or leaving in the seeds for more of a kick.  This is so easy to make and only about 1o minutes of chopping are involved to create the best restaurant style salsa right in your slow cooker!

Arrange the tortillas in a stack and cut into 6 equal wedges. Pour about 1-inch of oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat to 350 degrees F on a deep-fat frying thermometer. Fry just a few at a time, turning occasionally, until crisp and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Drain on paper towels; sprinkle lightly with salt, if desired. Store in an airtight container.

I have made salsa over the years and have always just frozen the batch in individual plastic containers until ready to use. Not very interested in the canning process anymore. Any problem with doing the same with your recipe.

Because this particular salsa is made with fresh ingredients, it will last as long as you would expect cut fresh tomatoes to last. It’s best eaten right after you make it, chilled it should last about 5 days or so.

Salsa recipes tend to use jalapeno as the hot peppers but you can experiment with varieties and taste combinations. One year our jalapeno peppers didn’t yield a crop but our hot banana peppers did so we used those instead and it tasted great.

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  • Ladle hot salsa into hot, sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims clean with a damp towel; place lids on jars, and secure in place by hand tightening the bands onto the jars.

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