“freezing fresh tomato sauce recipe salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes and garlic”

Angela: I am glad peppers freeze well. Last year I was planning to can a large batch of salsa, but lost all my tomatoes to late blight. The peppers were measured out, chopped and frozen for later use. Worked out in the end.

This is fantastic! It took me the better part of the day after shopping for ingredients, and it was worth every effort. I love thick salsa and this recipe is a winner. Thanks for making this available on your site.

Many of us begin a vegetable garden with dreams of preserving the harvest dancing in our heads. Even if you don’t grow food, the fresh ingredients for homemade salsa are abundant at farmers markets and farm stands during the growing season. Stock up with enough to can a batch of homemade salsa and enjoy the delicious flavors of summer all winter long.

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Use as much or as little jalapeño as you like. If you accidentally put in too much, add more tomatoes or even blend in a little tomato sauce if you have some on hand. This recipe also works well with canned diced tomatoes when you’re craving a taste of summer during the dark days of winter.

My husband’s favorite restaurant, naturally, is a local Mexican bar: “…famous Mexican cafe. It’s the great taste of Mexico right in your neighborhood.” (Can you just hear the corny commercial jingle?) It’s not exactly in our neighborhood, but it’s worth the 20-minute drive. They have a wet burrito that enables you to skip looking at the menu altogether.

Making and canning your own salsa is something families remember years later.  No store bought salsa, even if it is shipped from Texas, compares with the taste of that made from your own tomatoes from your garden or fresh-picked from a local farm!  In the middle of the winter, you can have tortilla chips and your salsa and taste the summer flavor of fresh tomatoes. If you like cilantro in your salsa, see this recipe instead.

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I love home canned salsa, especially when made from fresh garden tomatoes and peppers out of my garden. But I’ve always been frustrated with these salsas always being runny and thin, even if the recipe calls it chunky. I’ve also been disappointed with the strong vinegar flavor that most home-canned recipes usually have. Comparatively, the store bought stuff is always really thick and chunky, and never has much of a vinegar flavor, but inevitably, it never has a really good fresh tomato flavor. It’s been a lose lose battle for me between store bought and home-canned salsas for years.

Ok. I made the salsa yesterday and threw a jar into the fridge due to an improper seal. I spooned some of the salsa onto my avocado and eggs tonight, and it was divine. I had told myself just one day spent on making salsa, but I may make it two:)

Blanch, peel and coarsely chop tomatoes. Measure 7 cups (1750 ml). Wearing rubber gloves remove seeds and finely chop jalapenos. Combine tomatoes, onions, green pepper, jalapeno peppers, garlic, tomato paste, vinegar, cilantro and cumin in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil gently stirring occasionally until salsa reaches desired consistency, about 30 mins.

10 Let jars cool, lids should pop: Remove jars from the water bath and let sit on a counter for several hours until completely cool. The lids should “pop” as the cooling salsa creates a vacuum under the lid and the jars are sealed.

Brighten up your favorite main dishes by adding fresh Serrano-Cilantro Salsa. We love serving this as a topping on our savory flank steak Suadero Tacos. Cooking the serrano peppers along with diced onion and garlic brings out a smoky flavor. Be sure to process the pepper mixture and the rest of the ingredients in order to make sure this salsa is totally dippable.

Hi Tina. Good question. I don’t know about cornstarch and what that would do from a canning perspective. Older cans of tomato paste often do get a metallic taste from the can, but new/fresh cans usually do not in my experience if that helps at all.

[…] cayenne (pictured here) and jalapeno peppers, pepper flakes or cayenne powder in Hot Pepper Jelly, Salsa, Tomato Jam, Stews, Popcorn Seasoning and tons of other recipes.  We like a bit of heat in our […]

Thanks Theresa. People have been canning with your mom’s method for many years. And it probably does work well for your family. But it is not a recommended as safe process from the food safety police as it provides for a chance of bacteria growth in your canned jars. For legal reasons, I can’t recommended any process not blessed by the local food extensions. Sure you understand that. But I appreciate you sharing with me.

Hi!! First of all thanks for responding all the questions. I want to do this salsa. First timer canning and doing salsa. I have a question if I want to do just half sweet salsa and half spicy. Any idea. Also I’m a fan of measuring by ounces/cups not counting the quantities of peppers. Congrats on this total success salsa!

Thanks Cheryl. Glad you loved the salsa. Like you said, the recipe is pretty mild, but that way it’s a safe bet for all. I tend to add more jalapeños myself too, but the baseline recipe is a winner. Thanks for the comment. Come back again and try some other Bald Gourmet treats.

Making this recipe is time well spent: You’ll be rewarded with lots of smoky-garlicky-peppery sauce, which keeps in the fridge for up to two weeks or in the freezer for a couple of months. There are lots of delicious ways to use it: Dip veggies or steamed shrimp in it, use it to flavor omelets, thin it with a little vinegar and water for salad dressing, try it as a sandwich spread, or smear it over pizza dough for a Spanish pie.

Can you can this particular recipe for salsa or is there another close version that could be canned? Also, how long does this keep in the refrigerator? Thank you in advnce for any and all comments on this topic.

While you can go that route, I find that it yields a watery, flavorless salsa, and I’m obviously not down for that. So, instead, I tested multiple canned-tomato varieties as a base and found fire-roasted tomatoes to be the best fit!

I would like to make this, although we just finished off a jar of LF (roasted) salsa and it was REAL good. The only problem would be getting tomatoes in winter, so this homemade salsa would be great. Thanks.

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[…] For one thing, salsa is serious business around here. I may have mentioned my Tostitos addiction at some point? And runny food processor made salsa is not going to cut it. I’m sorry, it’s just not. This recipe is the best homemade salsa EVER. […]

Great texture (not runny) and great taste. Everyone that I’ve had try it says it’s the best salsa they have ever had. I make as is, however if it want it extra hot I add 1T ground habanero powder to the whole batch. I just ate my last jar today so thank goodness my tomatoes have finally started ripening! Thank you for sharing this recipe.

A. Yes, salsa, tends to be at peak quality for about 6 months, then ok for another 6 months. After that, the USDA says it is still safe to eat as long as the seal is intact, but it darkens and becomes mushier than most people would like! So, if you have an older jar, and there’s no leakage, a good seal, and everything looks ok, open it and try!

The humble tomato packs a nutritious punch. One medium tomato has about as much fiber as a slice of whole wheat bread. Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamins C and A, plus contain potassium and phosphorous.

2 cups bottled lemon or lime juice  or lemon juice (see this page for an explanation) (if you are using a mix, be sure to follow their recipe; the packet mixes often use vinegar instead of lemon juice). See this study comparing all 3. 

Combine strawberries, mango and cantaloupe for the base of this fruit salsa, and then add some savory flavor with cucumber, bell pepper, and onion. Serve this fruit-and-veggie salsa as a side dish or a topping for grilled fish or chicken.

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A. Well, Grandma may be sweet, but a lot of her generation died of cancer from smoking, heart from eating too much saturated fat… And food poisoning! 🙂 Jam should get 5 minutes in the boiling water bath, too.

I want garden salsa from my garden too. I didn’t do it last year, but hopefully this year will do it. I’m growing a lot more sauce tomatoes this year. Last year making sauce out of cherry tomatoes was a little annoying and the sauce came out too sweet.

Because this particular salsa is made with fresh ingredients, it will last as long as you would expect cut fresh tomatoes to last. It’s best eaten right after you make it, chilled it should last about 5 days or so.

One Comment

  • Here’s one of my favorite recipes for that: Crockpot Canning Salsa. It preserves all the tastes of a summer garden in one container: tomatoes, onions, cilantro, and three kinds of peppers. And it makes a nice big batch, so you can cook up a whole winter’s supply in one go.
    For mild salsa try hot peppers lower on the Scoville scale, such as poblano or even bell pepper. Remove all veins and seeds. Offer pickled serrano peppers to guests who enjoy fiery salsa. Buy an authentic brand such as Herdez.
    Coarsely chop the tomatoes, then place in a large colander set in sink, and allow to stand for 30 minutes. This will allow much of the tomato juice to strain out (place the colander over a large bowl if you wish to save the juice for something else).
    This salsa looks delicious. I’ve been needing a yummy fresh salsa recipes if my tomatoes ever ripen 🙁 Don’t feel bad about your garden, mine hasn’t been doing well either. Except my tomato plants, but they’re too busy growing to be taller than I am instead of making me some beautiful fruit. I can hardly hold them back but I’m sure I’ll get some tomatoes soon 🙂

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