“freezing fresh tomato sauce recipe easy fresh homemade salsa recipe”

This salsa is a perfect summer snack! For ease, I don’t worry about seeding the tomatoes and pulse the ingredients in the food processor; if my family deems it too “juicy,” we strain off a bit of the liquid and then add the lime juice.

Salsa verde is a versatile Latin condiment. Serve it over tacos, grilled steak or fish, or even hot dogs. Use it to make enchiladas or flavorful slow-cooker chicken. Of course, there’s always the option to eat it plain with tortilla chips!

I like to keep a big jar of the homemade salsa in my refrigerator for up to a week. I serve the chips and salsa with quick weeknight dinners like quesadillas or tacos, and Keith loves them as a side with his sandwiches at lunch. The kids even dip veggies in the salsa for afternoon snacks. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this is truly a kitchen staple — whether we’re hosting a party or not!

Just brilliant! Who would have thought canned tomatoes can make a mean salsa. I generally use canned tomatoes in stews and sauces and was certain that you can only make salsa with fresh tomatoes. Duh! And I see you’ve added cukes in there too…interesting! I like the sound of spicy habanero sauce but I can’t seem to find that particular aardvark brand anywhere.

Be very careful while handling the chile peppers. If you can, avoid touching the cut peppers with your hands. (I often use disposable gloves or hold the peppers with a plastic sandwich bag.) Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water after handling and avoid touching your eyes for several hours.

©Holly Nilsson for SpendWithPennies.com. Content and photographs are copyright protected. Sharing of this recipe is both encouraged and appreciated. Copying and/or pasting full recipes to any social media is strictly prohibited. Please view my photo use policy here.

Bring a large pot of water to a rapid boil. Carefully drop the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds them remove. Peel the skins and squeeze the seeds to remove them along with excess water. Place the tomatoes in a colander to drain. Chop the tomatoes.

Dana, this recipe is amazing! better than the Lone Star restaurant chips and salsa we love and half the price! So easy to make too. Those fire roasted tomatoes really made the dish. Any Canadians here – you can find Alymer fire roasted tomatoes at Loblaws/Zehrs

This is the time of summer where the gardens are getting full of fresh veggies.  If you are wondering what to do with all of those garden veggies make this salsa ASAP!   This salsa uses 7 cups of fresh tomatoes and is full of such amazing flavor.

Ok. I made the salsa yesterday and threw a jar into the fridge due to an improper seal. I spooned some of the salsa onto my avocado and eggs tonight, and it was divine. I had told myself just one day spent on making salsa, but I may make it two:)

You know that salsa you get at Mexican restaurants the minute you walk in with lots of chips, well that’s my favorite salsa ever and I’ve never been able to get that out of a jar. But salsa is simple enough that you can make yourself at home with a handful of fresh ingredients.

This basic recipe for fresh, homemade salsa is a great place to start, but let your garden (and your taste buds) be your guide. Whether it’s corn, cucumbers or even roasted root vegetables, salsa is the great equalizer.

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. If you prefer a smoother texture―more like jarred―pulse half the salsa in a food processor, then combine it with the remaining chunky half. Cover tightly and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

This fun, fresh-tasting salsa from Nancy Whitford of Edwards, New York, is strawberry-sweet with just a hint of bite. “I found the recipe in our local paper years ago. It really adds a punch to fish, chicken or tortilla chips and has wonderful color and eye appeal.”

9 Boil in a water bath: Place the filled and lidded jars back onto the rack in the large stock-pot of hot water you used to sterilize the jars in step one. You may need to remove some of the water from the pot to prevent it from overfilling.

Cook the salsa until it’s nice and hot (boiling), and then follow the instructions I posted yesterday for canning tomatoes (it’s important to clean and fill jars correctly if you’ve not canned before!). If it seems too juicy, you can always boil off some of the water.

The bell peppers are necessary as a good base to the salsa but they don’t add any heat. Adding the jalapenos as listed above should make your salsa come out a notch or two above the hot stuff you get at the store (still not very hot in my opinion). Adding less or more jalapenos will vary the degree of heat to the salsa. I chop the whole pepper as well (minus the stem) as the heat is stored in the guts of the pepper which a lot of people mistakenly clean out with the seeds. Adding other varieties of hot peppers or sauces will also add flavor and make your salsa unique. Just be careful but remember experimentation is a good thing.

Place the tomatoes, onions and garlic on a baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes or just until the onions and tomatoes start to get a little char on them. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let the tomatoes cool for about 5 minutes.

This recipe uses specific amounts of ingredients, balancing the non-acidic ingredients with the amount of added acid needed to make the recipe safe. Do not increase the amount of green chiles beyond 1 1/2 cups, or decrease the amount of tomatoes less than 7 cups.

I tripled the recipe and added 1/4 c. extra sugar and ended up with 21 pints. You can use quarts instead, but refrigerate after opening. We like pints because we eat the whole thing at once. The entire jar is only 120 calories. Less if you use Splenda.

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make and tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

Cover the jars with at least 1-inch of water. Bring to a rolling boil and process for 15 minutes (20 minutes for altitudes 1000 to 6000 ft, 25 minutes above 6000 ft). Then turn off heat and let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes.

This salsa is fantastic! We made over 40 jars of it this summer, just varying the heat based on which peppers were maturing in the garden. We shared many jars with friends and family, but now my husband is jealously guarding the last dozen jars! Thanks for a really exceptional recipe!

I am going to try this recipe. I have one but my husband finds it too runny. I don’t like canning so I freeze it. Do you think yours would be fine to freeze as well? I can’t see why not it will probably have extra liquid when unthawing which I can just drain. I just wanted your thoughts.

Hi Jeri Lou! I mentioned that step in the pictured instructions but left it out in the recipe box – it’s now added 🙂 There has been a lot of discussion about canning and bacteria in some of my other canning posts. The fact of the matter is, bacteria cannot survive or form in an airtight space. Still, it never hurts to take extra precautions.

You will benefit from a canning funnel and essentials when filling your jars. They are just a few dollars, last forever and are infinitely handy in the kitchen for filling canning jars and freezer bags.

No Comments

  • I made over 20 pints of this last year with a huge 10 dollar apple box full of tomatoes. This recipe was SO good. Really the best homemade salsa I have ever, ever had. I was just finding it again for this year. I’ll definitely print it out so I don’t lose it. The one tip I would give is to have extra jalapenos on hand, in case you want it hotter. I was worried about it being too hot last year, and it ended up not being quite hot enough. It was still super good though.

Join the Discussion

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>