“easy spicy salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes best homemade fresh tomato salsa recipe”

Look for large juicy tomatoes when you make salsa. Removing the seeds is easy with a small spoon. Hold the quartered tomato over a bowl to catch the seeds and juice as you scoop them out, and use it in the salsa if you like.

I made your salsa last year and it was amazing. It was the first to go off the pantry shelf and I’ll definitely be making it again this year if my garden produces like it did last year. My husband likes strong flavors so I think I added more cumin and cilantro. We also really like the smokiness of chipotle so next year I think I may add some of those as well.

Looks amazing – and truly a great recipe during tomato season. I am always swimming in a sea of tomato plants and there are more tomatoes than recipes – or at least that’s what it feels like at the time. 🙂

Serve this citrusy salsa with chips, or spoon it atop sautéed chicken breast or fish. If you want to make the salsa ahead, omit the cilantro and avocado, and stir them in just before serving. If you find blood oranges, substitute them for regular oranges for color.

[…] For one thing, salsa is serious business around here. I may have mentioned my Tostitos addiction at some point? And runny food processor made salsa is not going to cut it. I’m sorry, it’s just not. This recipe is the best homemade salsa EVER. […]

Hi Linda. About a year ago I got into family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

Hi, Sommer, I was pointed to your blog by Cory Kowalski. I immediately saved your detox soup recipe AND the salsa one. I love salsa and love making it, but I can’t eat as much as I’d like to because I have kidney disease (and tomatoes aren’t good for me). I am going to try making a salsa with an extra dose of tomatilos, substituting them for some of the tomatoes. I’ll let you know how it comes out. BTW, I can’t find a ‘follow’ on your site — except pointing to Pinterest, which I know nothing about.

Nope. The tomatoes have enough liquid in them already. You want to drain them before cooking, and then cook them long to get rid of as much liquid as possible. This is what gives the end salsa such a good thick consistency. Glad you asked Lise.

I made this last year with home grown walla walla onions and the yellow peppers. The salsa was wonderful although a little sweet. My girlfriend thought maybe the onions and the yellow pepper. Any suggestions as to what I might do to take the too sweet out? Other then that it was the best ever.

I tripled the recipe and added 1/4 c. extra sugar and ended up with 21 pints. You can use quarts instead, but refrigerate after opening. We like pints because we eat the whole thing at once. The entire jar is only 120 calories. Less if you use Splenda.

Spread a kitchen towel on the counter. Use your jar lifter to remove warm jars from canner, drain, and line up on the towel. Use your canning ladle and funnel and add the salsa to the warm jars leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe the rims. Use your magnetic lid lifter to lift lids out of the warm water, center lid on the jar, and screw on band until it is fingertip tight.

Stir all this in the bowl, and now its time to add the tomatoes. I always use fresh tomatoes (even if I have to pay for the nice ones at the store in winter). You can do 50/50 fresh vs. canned and it will still taste good, but if you do all canned tomatoes it will taste like canned salsa which you might as well just buy at the store. That’s really the big secret to great salsa. Fresh tomatoes, fresh peppers and fresh cilantro taste a whole lot better than stuff that’s been sitting on the shelf for a few months. Back to the tomatoes though, I peel them and puree them and add them to the mix. Your bowl should be almost half full pre-tomatoes and that’s generally the ratio I use. Good salsa is about 50% tomatoes and 50% other good stuff. Stir all this really well, and now it is time to season and taste test. You will want to put in 3-4 tablespoons of salt (this is a big batch after all). I taste test while adding the salt. Not enough and it will taste a little flat, too much and it will be … too salty. If you go overboard you can add more tomatoes to dilute it (this works with the pepper heat too), but I just add some and taste until its right. Now add some black pepper and Tabasco, or experiment on other hot sauces. I also like to add a couple tablespoons vinegar and juice from one lime to add acidity. Once everything is mixed in and suits your taste, give it a final good blending and place in the refrigerator. It’s good for it to set in the cool for a few hours or even overnight as this allows all the flavors to mix together and steep. Just like a good chili, salsa is always better the next day. You should have a mammoth sized bowl of salsa that looks like it will last a month, but trust me, I doubt it makes it to the end of the week. Now its time to stock up on the Tostitos!

I am still a little scared of canning, enough so that I left a question at this post about headspace in canning jars (for salsa, I think you should leave about 1/2-1 inch, in other words, fill until you reach the bottom of the jar band), and I think you should probably read the canning and food safety post as well.

This is AWESOME! I have been making salsa for 20 years and this is by far the best I have ever made. I used lemon juice in stead of lime juice it is great. I grew my own peppers and tomatoes. Thank you thank you.

Sugar is added to many spaghetti sauce and salsa recipes to cut the acidic taste of the tomatoes. It won’t make the canning “bad” like forgetting the vinegar would, so as long as you like the flavor – and I bet it will work out just fine – you’re golden! 🙂 Katie

Very good Damn salsa! Want to switch it up and try this recipe a little different? I made this with no cumin and I substituted lime juice instead of lemon. It gives it a more authentic flavor. (I’m from the southwest) leave the cumin for the main dish. (Although very good) Call it The Best Damn Salsa With Lime!)

Making this recipe is time well spent: You’ll be rewarded with lots of smoky-garlicky-peppery sauce, which keeps in the fridge for up to two weeks or in the freezer for a couple of months. There are lots of delicious ways to use it: Dip veggies or steamed shrimp in it, use it to flavor omelets, thin it with a little vinegar and water for salad dressing, try it as a sandwich spread, or smear it over pizza dough for a Spanish pie.

What to do with your bumper crop of tomatoes and peppers? Your garden is a great resource for gifting. Make this delicious Fresh Tomato salsa to can!  Full of perfectly ripe tomatoes, peppers and onions, blended with spices you can control according to your own preferences. Home canned salsa makes a wonderful family pantry staple or food gift for your family, office and friends.

Thank you for this recipe. I started making this 3 years ago. I followed your recipe exactly and it was awesome! I have since made it my own with the different types of chilis I use and other seasonings and still people can’t stop raving about how good this salsa is. It truly is thick and chunky. It doesn’t taste like plain old chopped tomatoes. No, no. It’s…it’s…a perfect blend of ingredients that tastes the opposite of canned! It is cooked, but not that typical store-bought-canned taste. I made 3 dozen quarts one season hoping it would see us through the winter. Ha, was I wrong. It was all gone before we hit the middle of fall!! We use it on tacos of course, and even throw a few spoonfuls into ground meat to give our burgers a kick!

9 Boil in a water bath: Place the filled and lidded jars back onto the rack in the large stock-pot of hot water you used to sterilize the jars in step one. You may need to remove some of the water from the pot to prevent it from overfilling.

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