“easy salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes and corn salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes and garlic”

I love this recipe because it is hearty and made from all fresh ingredients. We’ve all devoured it this week, including Hailey. If I wasn’t planning on sharing with her, I would have added another jalapeno to kick up the spice factor, which you may want to consider doing.

Hi Judith. So I called my extension office about the safety of adding corn to the salsa recipe. They said not to do it. Corn, black beans, and the like require pressure canning and are not safe for water bath canning. They recommended just mixing some corn into the salsa later when you open up a jar to eat.

Awesome Barb! Glad it turned out so good. I do love this salsa recipe. Your modification ideas sound pretty good too. As for shelf life, I got the base for this recipe in a Better Homes and Gardens book, and mostly just modified the spices and such, so I would say its pretty safe. I’m still eating mine a year after it was canned and I haven’t killed myself off yet! You should be good for a year as well too.

Streetlights flickered across the dusty lanes of La Yarada as Gloria flipped tortillas over a fiery comal, which she’d inherited from her grandmother. Ice cubes clinked inside a cocktail shaker as Joshua sloshed a tequila, amaretto and lime juice concoction into salted margarita glasses.

Quarter and seed tomatoes. Cut tomatoes into 1/4-inch dice and transfer to a bowl. Wearing rubber gloves, seed and finely chop chiles. Finely chop enough onion to measure 1/4 cup and chop cilantro. Stir chiles, onion, cilantro, and garlic into tomatoes with sugar and lime juice and salt and pepper to taste. Salsa may be made 1 hour ahead and kept at cool room temperature.

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We served this salsa as a bed for flaky Grilled Grouper, but feel free to serve as an appetizer with chips. Kalamata olives bring a slightly unexpected briny flavor to this salsa, which you won’t be able to resist. 

I just made this using jalapeños instead of serrano. I used a larger onion and one more tomato. Now I boiled then simmered but it didn’t get as red as the photo above. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? How do I get that deep red tone?

P.S. Thank you so much for this recipe. The prep and chopping have been so great for me. I retired a year ago after 37 years in education as a teacher and then elementary principal. I was in a real funk with the school starting and all the chopping and smells from the cooking have brought me right out of the funk! THANKS!!

Samantha, it really depends on the tomatoes. We started with really red ripe tomatoes. If the tomatoes are a little more pale the salsa tends to be on the orange side. It will be just as tasty though. Cheers!

My boyfriend and I made your salsa the other day…OMG!! We try a new recipe every year because we haven’t found one yet with a WOW factor…until now! Thanks so much for sharing. I just printed about 20 recipes off your website to try. Our search for salsa recipes is finally over, no way you could improve on this one.

Be very careful while handling the chile peppers. If you can, avoid touching the cut peppers with your hands. (I often use disposable gloves or hold the peppers with a plastic sandwich bag.) Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water after handling and avoid touching your eyes for several hours.

Tomatoes have enough acid to require only a water bath for processing; but by the time you add the other ingredients which have no acidity, you’ve got a food that can spoil easily. That’s why most salsa recipes include a couple of cups of vinegar or lemon juice (both very acidic).

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

A-mazing! We moved to southern Italy and there is no salsa down here! I grew cilantro and as soon as it was ready to harvest, I tried the recipe. I made only half a batch since the peppers are different. I used roasted bell peppers and a very spicy paprika. I plan on making more and next year, I will plant anaheim and jalapeño peppers. But for now, we have salsa!!!!

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make and tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

This sounds wonderful! I love homemade salsa, and there is nothing better than garden fresh tomato. My mom has tomato plants but whenever I go home it’s a race to get to the tomato plant before my dog Bentley does. He loves tomatoes and eats them all right off the vines.

In a blender or food processor, combine roasted vegetables, whole peeled tomatoes, garlic, lime juice, cilantro, cumin, salt, and pepper. Pulse to chop and combine, making sure not to overwork mixture. After about 4-8 pulses, check consistency. If you prefer a thinner salsa, add reserved tomato juice.

This was a delicious way to use ripe tomatoes. I decided to make this at the last minute to serve with pork carnitas, rice, and tortillas. I’m so glad I did – this salsa made the meal. It had a full, robust flavor and was the perfect complement to the other items served.

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  • Use a ladle to fill the hot jars with the hot salsa, leaving ¼ inch head space. Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. Make sure the jars are fully submerged under water with several inches of water above them. Remove the jars and let them rest undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.
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    Blanch, peel and coarsely chop tomatoes. Measure 7 cups (1750 ml). Wearing rubber gloves remove seeds and finely chop jalapenos. Combine tomatoes, onions, green pepper, jalapeno peppers, garlic, tomato paste, vinegar, cilantro and cumin in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil gently stirring occasionally until salsa reaches desired consistency, about 30 mins.
    Ladle hot salsa into hot, sterilized pint canning jars, leaving a 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims clean with a damp towel; place lids on jars, and secure in place by hand tightening the bands onto the jars.

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