“easy garden fresh salsa recipe thick fresh salsa recipe”

1 Water bath Canner (a huge pot to sanitize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 – $30 at mall kitchen stores and local “big box” stores.  Note: we sell canners, supplies and kits through our affiliates: click here or see the bottom of this page) Tomatoes are on the border between the high-acid fruits that can be preserved in a boiling-water bath and the low-acid fruits, vegetables  and meats that need pressure canning.

Or I should use the plural and say “salsa-s”. Any decent Mexican establishment north of the border, whether a taco truck or full on restaurant will offer a variety of salsas to its patrons—tomatillo salsa verde, red chili salsa, and my favorite, a fresh tomato salsa otherwise knows as Pico de Gallo or Salsa Fresca.

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Try sliceing tomatoes and layering them in a colinder with salt between each layer. Let sit over night in a cool place (not in the frig.) covered with a cloth. Try an outside sink so the juice gets away from the tomatoes, then proceed with yoiur favoriate recipe.

Simple, fresh and easy to make. A winning Mexican restaurant style salsa prepared with plum tomatoes, onion cilantro, and serrano peppers. Fresh tomatoes, not canned, star in this recipe. In Mexico, it is known as salsa roja (red sauce) or salsa de mesa (table sauce). And just like in the U.S., it is served in every restaurant before your meal with tortilla chips.

Hmmmm…I’ve never minded the vinegar flavor if it was evident, but maybe it was just different for me. ?? Is it possible that the peppers and tomatoes were measured before chopping finely instead of after? That would explain both the low quantity and the high vinegar, wrong ratio.

I have checked out all kinds of recipes online and your recipe is the winner I am gonna make a batch tonite I was wondering if I could use citric acid (food grade of course) instead of the lime juice and vinegar?

Our garden has an abundance of cherry tomatoes, so I used those coarsely chopped but unseeded. That was the only deviation I made from the recipe as given. I used one serrano pepper and one jalapeno peper, also from our garden. Declared “awesome” by my daughter-in- law. The other five people around the table must have liked it too, because the salsa was gone (save a chip with the last bit of salsa, saved for me to taste)by the time I got out to the deck with my drink. The fresh tomatoes and cilantro are key. The salsa does have a bit of a kick, which we like, but if you have a group that does not like “hot” salsa, less garlic and milder peppers would be the way to go.

A little browning of the skin on top is desired. When done cover the tray with a cloth or piece of parment paper for about 10 min and those skins can be pulled off very easily. With this method there is less water taken in by the tomatoes inadvertently, making a much richer thicker salsa The juice emitted from the tomatoes during the broil and given up by the tomatoes when they sit, I put ontop of the stove in a pot and reduce the fluid level by at least half. Add this back into the prepared tomatoes (we don’t want to lose any of the natural acidity of the tomatoes in it’s juice). P. S. I use lime juice too! It rocks Guidelines in canning usually recommend lime juice in containers as opposed to fresh as the acidity can vary using the fresh fruits. Be safe and once again congrats!

Put the tomatoes in boiling water about a minute and then immediately submerge them in ice water for easy peeling. As you can see, the skins loosen from the tomato. Peel your tomatoes for fresh tomato salsa to can.

I was surfing for a good recipe source & picked a very basic dish. I then looked for one that had not been played with too much, and then I found you & Gloria’s salsa. Success! I also started my food journey at a young age, with my grandmother as my tutor& guide.

On adjusting recipes: I know you want to “make this your own,” but with canning recipes you can only do so much. It’s important for food safety to have the proper ratio of acidic to non-acidic foods. The tomatoes are acidic, but the peppers, onions, and garlic are not. That’s why you must add the vinegar, and you can’t really mess with the amounts of peppers.You could, however, fiddle with green peppers and colored bells, or sub some of the jalapenos out for a milder pepper if you don’t like it so spicy. Just don’t be too generous with your helpings and overdo the amounts. That’s one thing I love about this recipe – it gives quantities in cups, rather than forcing me to scratch my head and wonder which onion is “small” and which green pepper fits the “medium” category.See this article on Modifying Canning Recipes and Food Safety for more details.

The jars need to be HOT and STERILE. I run mine through the dishwasher and keep them in there hot and sterile until I fill them with HOT salsa. NEVER put cold to boiling hot into glass jars of any type. You can also use a bleach bath in the sink and exchange the water occasionally from a boiling kettle to keep them hot. Just rinse the jars before filling them.

Really good! I’ve tried and tried to make salsa never with any success. When you said to seed it I thought why not peel it as well! So I dumped all my various heirlooms that I hadn’t eaten yet into boiling water for 30 seconds or so and peeled and seeded them. I also used what peppers I had on hand: a mira pepper (like a small sweeter bell) a banana pepper, and a hot purple pepper. made a mild/medium spiciness. I agree with others, double the batch! I might leave out the sugar next time to see how it tastes.

Slow Cooker Restaurant Style Garden Salsa has so many delicious and fresh ingredients and uses up all of those garden tomatoes. It is so addicting you won’t be able to get enough! It is also perfect for canning.

Spread a kitchen towel on the counter. Use your jar lifter to remove warm jars from canner, drain, and line up on the towel. Use your canning ladle and funnel and add the salsa to the warm jars leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Wipe the rims. Use your magnetic lid lifter to lift lids out of the warm water, center lid on the jar, and screw on band until it is fingertip tight.

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Salsa recipes tend to use jalapeno as the hot peppers but you can experiment with varieties and taste combinations. One year our jalapeno peppers didn’t yield a crop but our hot banana peppers did so we used those instead and it tasted great.

Rachel, you can substitute jalapeños for the serrano chiles and get great results. Try the recipe with 2 jalapeños and if the salsa is too spicy reduce it to one. Removing the seeds and veins from the chiles reduces the heat too. Cheers!

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What advantage does simmering the Salsa make? Is this how it is done in most Mexican Restaurants? Believe me I am not criticizing I am just trying to learn. If this is a necessary step that I have been omitting and it will make my Salsa taste better I am all for it. I have just never heard of doing it before.

Pineapple-Cucumber Salsa offers refreshing flavor with a little bite. Serve as a topping to our Mini Crab Cakes. This tropical topping also pairs beautifully with flaky white fish or grilled chicken. We also love serving it as a refreshing condiment for tacos. 

2 Roast chile peppers: Roast the Anaheim green chile peppers until blackened all over. The best way to do this is directly over a gas flame on the stovetop (see how to roast chiles over a gas flame.) If you don’t have a gas cooktop you can broil the chiles, or blister them on a grill.

After 12 to 24-hours, check to be sure jar lids have sealed by pushing on the center of the lid. The lid should not pop up. If the lid flexes up and down, it did not seal. Refrigerate jar and use up within a week. Once the jar is open, refrigerate and use up within a week. Yields 6 half pints, 3 pints.

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Quarter and seed tomatoes. Cut tomatoes into 1/4-inch dice and transfer to a bowl. Wearing rubber gloves, seed and finely chop chiles. Finely chop enough onion to measure 1/4 cup and chop cilantro. Stir chiles, onion, cilantro, and garlic into tomatoes with sugar and lime juice and salt and pepper to taste. Salsa may be made 1 hour ahead and kept at cool room temperature.

Linda, glad the cooking saved your day! It always picks me up too. As for the jelly jars, they should be just fine. Just follow the same guidelines and leave the same headspace. I’ve canned this salsa in both pints and quarts, and can’t imagine the half pint jelly jars will make any difference. I think you can get away with less processing time doing half pints (just 10), but just do the full 15 minutes to be safe. It won’t affect the salsa any.

This recipe comes at the perfect time. My tomatoes are just about ripe and I was just looking in my canning cookbooks tonight for a salsa recipe and didn’t find one I liked. Can’t wait to try this one!

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