“easy fresh salsa recipe taste of home fresh garden vegetable salsa recipe”

Pepper varieties can be mixed and matched in this recipe, but do not change total amount of peppers. The recipe as written produces a medium-hot salsa. Use more hot peppers and fewer mild peppers for a fierier salsa. Some examples of mild peppers include bell, banana, and Anaheim. Hot peppers include habanero, jalapeño, and Serrano. Do not change the total amount of peppers or the recipe may not be safe for canning.

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The humble tomato packs a nutritious punch. One medium tomato has about as much fiber as a slice of whole wheat bread. Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamins C and A, plus contain potassium and phosphorous.

This is one of those recipes that only takes 15 minutes to make and tastes a million times better than anything from a jar. If you don’t have the time to dice the tomatoes, you can pulse them a few times in a food processor. The salsa won’t look as pretty, but it will taste just as fabulous.

Taste and adjust flavor as needed, adding more salt for saltiness, lime for acidity, garlic for kick/zing, cilantro for herb flavor, pepper or mild green chilies for heat, or a little stevia or sugar to sweeten/offset heat.

I made this salsa today; included the cumin, lime and garlic as suggested. However, I had to use diced green chiles instead of the serrano peppers because the peppers are too hot for my family (I like it but…they won out). Mild and delish! Next time I may use roasted romas instead of regular roma tomatoes. Great recipe. Gracias!

I would like to try your salsa this year. However, I am not a big fan of vinegar in salsa. I successfully substituted lime juice in the recipe I canned last year. Do you think that would work in this one as we’ll? Thanks!

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Tex Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

Either works equally well. The salsa mix for canning has the advantage of being tested and easy. It’s basically corn starch, onion powder, salt and seasoning. It doesn’t have any preservative to improve the canning, so the advantage is only that it is easier.  However, I like my custom-made from fresh seasonings better, so here is the recipe for that:

This juicy salsa pulls sweet and savory double duty: Liven up a cheese platter with it, or spoon it over goat cheese or a wheel of Brie. We also love to serve it along with Grilled Pork Chops. Don’t worry about serving this salsa the day-of, allowing the flavors to meld overnight as they chill in the refrigerator will only make it that much sweeter. 

Transfer the drained tomatoes to a 7-8 quart stainless-steel, enamel, or nonstick heavy pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer, uncovered, for about 1.5 hours or until tomatoes are at the desired consistency, stirring often. You’re looking for the same consistency as a thin marinara sauce.

One Comment

  • Bring it to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 minutes until it has taken on a deep red color and has more body. Looks good, doesn’t it? The tomatoes need to be very ripe for the sauce to take on the deep red color in the photos.
    Hi Judith. So I called my extension office about the safety of adding corn to the salsa recipe. They said not to do it. Corn, black beans, and the like require pressure canning and are not safe for water bath canning. They recommended just mixing some corn into the salsa later when you open up a jar to eat.
    I made this and it’s amazing! I left Texas about a year ago and have been missing authentic Tex-Mex salsa so much… until I found this recipe! I use 4 jalapenos, and leave some seeds in, to make it a little spicier 🙂
    There are many varieties of salsa to choose from and endless ways to tweak current salsa recipes. Our fresh garden salsa recipe below will turn out right about in the middle of the heat spectrum – medium spiciness if you will. If you want to spice up your salsa more, or turn down the heat, simply vary the amount of Jalapeno peppers that you add to the salsa recipe.
    Serve this citrusy salsa with chips, or spoon it atop sautéed chicken breast or fish. If you want to make the salsa ahead, omit the cilantro and avocado, and stir them in just before serving. If you find blood oranges, substitute them for regular oranges for color.

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