“can you freeze fresh salsa recipe heb fresh salsa recipe”

Yum! I can’t wait until our garden veggies are ready! We planted 3 kinds of peppers, 3 different tomatoes, cucumber, zucchini, 2 types of squash, lettuce, peas, green beans, and pumpkins! The hubs also has several raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry bushes, and 3 grape vines! Hoping to make some wine 🙂

What to do with your bumper crop of tomatoes and peppers? Your garden is a great resource for gifting. Make this delicious Fresh Tomato salsa to can!  Full of perfectly ripe tomatoes, peppers and onions, blended with spices you can control according to your own preferences. Home canned salsa makes a wonderful family pantry staple or food gift for your family, office and friends.

I have made salsa using this recipe twice now and its absolutely the best salsa I have ever eaten. I gave a jar to a few friends and they agree. They keep asking me when I’m making more. Luckily I have a large amount of Roma tomatoes from my garden this year. I planted extra so I would have enough to make this salsa. Thank you for this excellent recipe.

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We make salsa using our charcoal grill- just put the tomatoes, green peppers, onions, whatever you want, directly onto the hot coals. After about an hour, take them off and let them cool, then rub off the charred skin (leave some on for more smokey flavor!), put them in a food processor with some seasonings and voila! We usually roast a head (?) of garlic at the same time and throw half of it in the salsa.

Put the tomatoes in boiling water about a minute and then immediately submerge them in ice water for easy peeling. As you can see, the skins loosen from the tomato. Peel your tomatoes for fresh tomato salsa to can.

Looks amazing – and truly a great recipe during tomato season. I am always swimming in a sea of tomato plants and there are more tomatoes than recipes – or at least that’s what it feels like at the time. 🙂

I made it tonight…tried some off the spoon ….pretty tasty…I added some Serrano peppers and more jalapeños to make it more spicy…hands are burning but my mouth is watering….thanks…used tomatoes from my garden

I love Pico, and this is an excellent choice. For family we frequently use green bell peppers instead of Serrano or hot peppers. The kids and non heat lovers enjoy it. I do not think it keeps well. It is a fresh salsa…

I do have a question though – does this recipe meet or pass any specific canning requirements for salsa? Last year it didn’t stick around long but this year if I make multiple batches some jars may hang around a little longer than others and I’m always paranoid about the safety of canning salsa. (I never give it away unless its fresh and I know they’ll eat it right away…) Any comments would be appreciated!

Hi Martha. I haven’t tried, but I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t use green tomatoes. It’s my understanding that green have more acidity than red, so safety shouldn’t be a concern. They are obviously more sour, not being ripe, so you may have to adjust the sugar content accordingly. You may be able to skip the “draining” step as well, being that green tomatoes have less water in them than red rip ones do. Before you bottle and process, taste the batch and adjust your sugar and spices from there. The taste after cooking should be pretty much the same as after processing. Anyhow, if you give it a try, let me know how it turns out. I’m curious to know.

P.S. Thank you so much for this recipe. The prep and chopping have been so great for me. I retired a year ago after 37 years in education as a teacher and then elementary principal. I was in a real funk with the school starting and all the chopping and smells from the cooking have brought me right out of the funk! THANKS!!

Add the onion, jalapeño and garlic to your food processor and pulse 2-3 times until roughly chopped but not liquid. Dump in the remaining ingredients and pulse a couple of times. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Serve with tortilla chips.

Salsa may feel fairly new to the condiment scene, but this favorite has been popular for thousands of years. Salsa was even a staple in the Aztec culture, where favored recipes included squash seeds and legumes.

1 tablespoon sugar (optional – you use Stevia (in a prepared form like Truvia, it measures same as sugar; if you use another form, you’ll do your own conversion) – or Splenda, if you prefer, if you are on a sugar-restricted diet, or simply omit the sugar)

Think salsa is just for chips? Think again! While we love the ease of throwing together a simple appetizer for hungry family and friends with one of our salsa recipes, chips, and guacamole; you can also use salsa as a tasty topping on your favorite tacos, grilled chicken, or fish. The possibilities are endless. If you’re crunched for time, but still want homemade flavor, start with a store-bought fresh salsa and stir in a few fresh ingredients like roasted corn, cilantro, and chopped red onion. If time is no object and you’re starting from scratch we recommend allowing plenty of time for your salsa mixture to chill in the refrigerator. This will help the flavors meld leaving you with a salsa recipe that is a surefire crowd pleaser. 

The name says it all. Awesome salsa, Great flavor. We added serrano peppers in place of the jalapeños to make it a little hotter. Doubling the recipe we canned 7 qtrs. Everyone loves it. Thanks for sharing

This amazing home-canned salsa really is thick and chunky, just like store bought salsa! it’s packed full of flavor, and doesn’t have a strong vinegar flavor so typical of home-canned salsas. One bite and you’ll never reach for Pace again!

Serve Green Tomato Salsa as an appetizer with chips or a topping on Green Tomato Chile Verde. This recipe only calls for 6 ingredients and comes together in a snap. We love the mix of flavors from the tomatoes, onion, cilantro, and jalapeño. 

Modern salsa recipes commonly includes tomatoes, peppers, onions, lime juice and cilantro, but the varieties are legion. Some like it hot, including the most fiery of peppers. Others might include mango, pineapple or peaches for a sweeter profile. Tomatoes can be pureed for a thinner “picante” style, or tomatillos used for a green “salsa verde.”

And for those of you wondering, can you use canned tomatoes? Yes. I have used fire-roasted canned, too, to supplement the tomatoes I had on hand. I just add the canned at the end of cooking down my fresh tomatoes. I even made a batch with all my left over tomatoes from saucers, beefsteaks, cherries…I throw into a food processor with skins on. We like it with all the bits of skins, too. Cuts down the time by a lot for making big batches like me!

This actually is the exact recipe I received from the friend. I wouldn’t change processing times without mentioning it. The other recipe I used processed for 30 minutes. ??? The salsa was great last year, not overcooked at all! Strange. I’ll have to look up some other recipes to decide if I want to shorten the time. I’m all nervous about some aspects of canning now! Thanks for the note, and the resources. 🙂 Katie

I have a question regarding the Anaheim peppers. I seen on the internet some places rate this as a medium to hot pepper and others call it a mild pepper. I’m not a fan of hot or spicy peppers but I like the flavor of some. Is there a good substitute that is not as hot?

This healthy take on the traditional chips-and-salsa combo is nearly fat-free and super-refreshing. The antioxidant-rich salsa is delicious served right after it’s made, but the flavors meld nicely after a day or two in the refrigerator.

This post is FULL of canning information, tips and equipment recommendations with affiliate links. Thank you for supporting Homemade Food junkie when you click the links and purchase we receive a small commision. You pay exactly the same as you would if you search it out yourself. If you’re new to food preservation I hope you find it useful.

Cool, thanks Terri. It is a winner recipe for sure. You can use citric acid instead, but I’m not of the ratio. Keep in mind that the lime juice doublse as a flavor component. I prefer fresh squeezed for that, but do what you prefer or have on hand. The thick and chunky part will stay the same regardless. Hope you enjoy!

I had save this recipe cause I knew it would be good, and it proved to be the best one I’ve ever made. My ratios of spices and peppers were a little altered, and I had a can of Muir Glen fire roasted, crushed tomatoes which added a little more depth perhaps, but it’s a big winner. I filed this in “Make Again” for sure! Thank you – love your emails.

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