“best fresh spicy salsa recipe taco time fresh salsa recipe”

karinagw, thank you for the glowing report! We also enjoy salsa with a little more texture. Next time you can add more peppers for extra spice. We have several friends who don’t enjoy the flavor of cilantro, either. One says it tastes like dirt! So we have experimented with cilantro-less salsa and found a little lime rounds on the flavors. Thanks again for your feedback. Have a great week.

Cool, thanks Terri. It is a winner recipe for sure. You can use citric acid instead, but I’m not of the ratio. Keep in mind that the lime juice doublse as a flavor component. I prefer fresh squeezed for that, but do what you prefer or have on hand. The thick and chunky part will stay the same regardless. Hope you enjoy!

[…] book club friends pretty much agreed, this book was a stinker, but the food was good. I served my homemade garden salsa, Cilantro Jalapeno Hummus and Trader Joe’s guacamole for an appetizer {good stuff}. The […]

Also, for those who are too lazy to put on gloves to cut chile peppers, you can always use a fork and knife, as if you were cutting them to eat them. That’s how they do it in Mexico. Just a note: they don’t even cut them with their bare hands down there, so don’t try it at home!

Update: Because I was paranoid about the peppers, I actually could have upped them a smidge. OTOH, right now it has a gentle heat which won’t burn you out after a couple bites. I did lie though. I omitted the celantro because I am one of those whose tastebuds interpret it as soap. Something tastes like it needs a little more of something, but possibly I mis-measured because the taste is wonderful..I might not whirl the tomatoes quite as much next time though. Boy, this a long comment to basically say Brava.

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The addition of olives makes this salsa a little different from other varieties. You can seed the jalapeno peppers if desired. But if you family likes salsa with some “heat”, leave them in.—Sharon Lucas, Raymore, Missouri

Thanks for this great recipe! My friend gave me a big box of her garden fresh tomatoes and I scoured the Internet looking for just the right recipe. I settled on your version and substituted a few of the jalapeño peppers with smokey chipotle peppers and it turned out very well for my first crack at homemade salsa! Thanks again for sharing!

This salsa looks delicious. I’ve been needing a yummy fresh salsa recipes if my tomatoes ever ripen 🙁 Don’t feel bad about your garden, mine hasn’t been doing well either. Except my tomato plants, but they’re too busy growing to be taller than I am instead of making me some beautiful fruit. I can hardly hold them back but I’m sure I’ll get some tomatoes soon 🙂

My daughter and I made a few batches of salsa this past autumn. The flavour is good and we have gotten many compliments on it, however I personally prefer a thicker salsa. I am definately going to try your recipe next canning season. I prefer using a pressure canner, so need to know if there is any reason you may not recommend this.

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When we were invited to a picnic with friends last weekend, I was tasked with bringing a side dish. On my weekly shopping trip to Kroger, I grabbed the ingredients for this homemade salsa, as well as a couple of bags of the Mission Organics Tortilla Chips. Only the finest for my friends and family!

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

Cook the salsa until it’s nice and hot (boiling), and then follow the instructions I posted yesterday for canning tomatoes (it’s important to clean and fill jars correctly if you’ve not canned before!). If it seems too juicy, you can always boil off some of the water.

Because this particular salsa is made with fresh ingredients, it will last as long as you would expect cut fresh tomatoes to last. It’s best eaten right after you make it, chilled it should last about 5 days or so.

4 Simmer all ingredients in a large pot: Put all of the ingredients into a large (8-qt) stainless steel pot. (Do not use aluminum or the acidity of the sauce will cause the aluminum to leach into the sauce.)

Hi Linda. About a year ago I got into family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

This salsa is We made over 40 jars of it this summer, just varying the heat based on which peppers were maturing in the garden. We shared many jars with friends and family, but now my husband is jealously guarding the last dozen jars! Thanks for a really exceptional recipe!

This is a fantastic and super simple recipe! I doubled the recipe because I consider salsa to be a food group in and of itself and wanted to have some for a few days. I also doubled the jalapeño as I like more kick. I must disagree with one of the other reviewers in that I found the flavor to be better the second day and still better the day after that! So much so that the next time I make it, I will make it the day before I need it so the flavors can meld overnight.

The only sad thing about tomatoes is that they don’t last. A beautiful, ripe tomato will keep for a week at most before it goes bad. So when the frost comes and kills the plants, that’s the end of garden-fresh tomatoes until next year.

One Comment

  • This is easy and fresh—spin it Italian by using EVOO and RedWine or BalsamicVinegar and Lots of Fresh Basil replacing the cilantro for Bruschestta or spin it Mid Easterrn adding Cukes, Mint and Dill with Toasted Pitas.–Watch the oil and skip the sugar– this is meant to be light! Summer tomatoes RULE!
    I just finish making 18 pints of salsa, using this recipe with some modifications! I added 2 cups of finely dice red and green bell peppers, increased the vinegar to 3/4 cup and came out with a pH of 4.1. I let it set for about 30 minutes after mixing to mix the flavors and then I brought to a boil and only simmered for about 5 minutes, as I like less soggy salsa!
    Hi just came across this recipe and will try but wondering if anyone has added fresh corn to the recipe??? I have corn from the garden I could use.. cant wait to try this……. I wish I wasn’t busy I want to try this today…..

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