“authentic fresh salsa recipe fresh thick chunky salsa recipe”

I tripled the recipe and added 1/4 c. extra sugar and ended up with 21 pints. You can use quarts instead, but refrigerate after opening. We like pints because we eat the whole thing at once. The entire jar is only 120 calories. Less if you use Splenda.

If you’re not feeling up to the canning process and you have some freezer space, why not try freezing some salsa? Freezing offers endless options and you get to control how much and what type of spicy peppers you want to toss in.  Here, I tossed in some cayenne and scotch bonnet peppers- oh yeah, baby!

32 pints is an undertaking! Glad you like the salsa Nina. Thanks for sharing with your friends. I was making peach salsa myself. If you have a source for peaches, you may want to give it a tasty try. I posted it just the other day.

Katie, a 35 minute processing time is TOO long for salsa- the reason your canned tomatoes need that long is because you don’t add a cup of vinegar. Do a quick Google search to find that all the reputable salsa recipes call for 15 minute processing time (extension services, and the Ball Blue Book are two)- even for the recipes that have tomato paste added. I know you said it will make you feel better to go longer, but there are good reasons not to: energy costs and over-cooking the salsa are two good ones.

Thanks for this great recipe! My friend gave me a big box of her garden fresh tomatoes and I scoured the Internet looking for just the right recipe. I settled on your version and substituted a few of the jalapeño peppers with smokey chipotle peppers and it turned out very well for my first crack at homemade salsa! Thanks again for sharing!

Tomatoes – about 15 lbs (yes, quite a few – you remove the skins, seeds and a lot of the water, so it takes a lot to start.) You’ll need about 3 quarts of prepared chopped tomatoes. This makes about 8 pints of salsa! If you only want to make a single jar, see this page instead!

Love this recipe! This is the second year we have done this salsa recipe and we have had nothing but success. I do use a variety of peppers instead of anaheims depending on what’s in the garden and always throw in a few cayennes. Thanks for such a easy and delicious recipe!

I made your salsa last year and it was awesome. For us here on the East Coast of Canada, we found that it required a little too much lime juice, but it turned out sooo good and I have had so many compliments. Thank you. Lillian

@Carl. My wife is Mexican and I’ve traveled there many times; particularly the state of Michoacán where she’s from. In Mexico, the sauce that you make is called a “Salsa Cruda” (Raw Sauce). It is perfectly fine to make it without frying/simmering since it’s just one of the MANY ways to make a sauce in the Mexican kitchen. I must say that adding cumin to a sauce is more typical of Mex than the authentic Mexican style sauce. Also, lime is only added to something such as pico de gallo. Salsa verde is another sauce that made by cooking tomatillos, jalapeños and a couple garlic cloves in slightly boiling water for about 10 min. Once the tomatillos are cooked, you add them with a little bit of the cooking water, the chilies, garlic, a piece of white onion, cilantro and salt to a food processor. This is carefully processed due to the hot liquid. Tomatillos can be pretty acidic so a pinch of sugar can be added to counter that. I’ve been in a ranch in Michoacán where they cooked a goat over a wood fire. I saw them make the “birria” (typical Mexican sauce for roasted meats) over the same wood fire. It picked up the smoke taste and I’ll tell you, it was the best BBQ goat that I EVER had!

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

Can you can this particular recipe for salsa or is there another close version that could be canned? Also, how long does this keep in the refrigerator? Thank you in advnce for any and all comments on this topic.

I have a question. I noticed from the pictures that the tomatoes when cooked look like the consistency of tomato sauce, no chunks …..however in your last picture of the finished product there is lots of tomato chunks (my kinda salsa) – how is this done?

The first year I made salsa, I used the boiling water method of removing the tomato skins. I no longer do that!! For me, the way to go is to broil the tomato halves after coring and washing at 425F for roughly 18 min

“I grow a wide variety of tomatoes and hot peppers in my garden every year for the sole purpose of making this recipe. The measurements aren’t exact, i.e. I use the eyeball/taste test method of cooking, but it always comes out great even if it is a little different each time.”

Good morning! I’m having a great weekend and I hope that all of you are too! Last night we took Landen out for sushi for his birthday dinner and then for yogurt…best night of eats EVER. Brad and I also made some of his famous homemade garden salsa. It is so good that I could pretty much put it on anything; eggs, salad, wraps, burgers, sweet potato, and definitely chips.

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  • Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!
    Hi Linda. About a year ago I got into family history work, so I can actually answer your question. My Yeager (Jaeger) ancestors originally came from Faltz Germany. They left in 1766 to settle the Norka river area in Saratov Russia, taking Catherine the Great up on her “generous” relocation offer. After years of struggle, many started leaving the area. My great grandparents left in 1890 to come to the U.S. They settled in Portland, OR. Others settled in Denver. So we may not be direct ancestral relatives, but could be connected somewhere along the lines.

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