“chevy’s fresh mex salsa recipe fresh salsa recipe with squash”

Katie, a 35 minute processing time is TOO long for salsa- the reason your canned tomatoes need that long is because you don’t add a cup of vinegar. Do a quick Google search to find that all the reputable salsa recipes call for 15 minute processing time (extension services, and the Ball Blue Book are two)- even for the recipes that have tomato paste added. I know you said it will make you feel better to go longer, but there are good reasons not to: energy costs and over-cooking the salsa are two good ones.

This was the first time I have made Salsa. I have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so was searching for recipes. Can’t tell you how I looked at before I found this one! The thickness of the Salsa is what appealed to me. I was not disappointed! This is an excellent salsa. Time consuming but worth it. I’m a beginner and I’m sure it will be faster next time. My only regret: not enough ripe tomatoes to double the recipe. I got 6 pints and it won’t last long! Next time I plan to add a little more heat. Thanks for the great recipe!

Really good! I’ve tried and tried to make salsa never with any success. When you said to seed it I thought why not peel it as well! So I dumped all my various heirlooms that I hadn’t eaten yet into boiling water for 30 seconds or so and peeled and seeded them. I also used what peppers I had on hand: a mira pepper (like a small sweeter bell) a banana pepper, and a hot purple pepper. made a mild/medium spiciness. I agree with others, double the batch! I might leave out the sugar next time to see how it tastes.

Haha! I can totally relate to that. This last Summer I canned up a STORM. It was my first time canning and even though I was excited about all of the jars full of different goodies, I was kind of nervous about actually eating and of it! So, in a streak of paranoia, I had my husband consult a colleague of his who is a pathologist. I figured since he is an expert on germs he ought to know about the safety of eating canned goods. The pathologist said that as long as the lid hasn’t popped it’s completely safe and he wouldn’t hesitate to eat it or feed it to his own kids. That made me feel a whole lot better 🙂 We’ve been enjoying all the jams, relishes, pickles, apple sauce, and salsas since and…we’re still breathing! Go for it, Tori!

This actually is the exact recipe I received from the friend. I wouldn’t change processing times without mentioning it. The other recipe I used processed for 30 minutes. ??? The salsa was great last year, not overcooked at all! Strange. I’ll have to look up some other recipes to decide if I want to shorten the time. I’m all nervous about some aspects of canning now! Thanks for the note, and the resources. 🙂 Katie

At right is a picture of tomatoes from my garden – they are so much better than anything from the grocery store. And if you don’t have enough, a pick-your-own farm is the pace to go!  At right are 4 common varieties that will work:

“This amazing salsa recipe is a family favorite, shared by my sister-in-law Rosanna. Great for those summer-fresh veggies! Wear gloves to avoid ‘burns’ from chopping peppers! ENJOY! Fabulous to add in some fresh cilantro and oregano also!”

Cover the jars with at least 1-inch of water. Bring to a rolling boil and process for 15 minutes (20 minutes for altitudes 1000 to 6000 ft, 25 minutes above 6000 ft). Then turn off heat and let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes.

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Individually chop all the peppers, onions, garlic, and cilantro and put them in a large bowl. A food processor comes in real handy here, but you can do it by hand as well. The processor helps, because I like my salsa pretty smooth, but you can make it chunky style too, that just depends on your personal preference.

LADLE hot salsa into hot jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot salsa. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar. Apply band until fit is fingertip tight.

This is the 2nd time I’ve made this recipe this summer. I made a double batch at the end of June (12 jars) and I’m down to my last jar so I’m making another double batch. It has been a big hit with the entire family! Thanks for such a great recipe!

Serve this citrusy salsa with chips, or spoon it atop sautéed chicken breast or fish. If you want to make the salsa ahead, omit the cilantro and avocado, and stir them in just before serving. If you find blood oranges, substitute them for regular oranges for color.

I made your salsa today. When my husband got home from work he saw that there was a little left in the bottom of the pot and scarfed it down. He said under no circumstances are we to share these jars with anyone! Excellent recipe. Thank you so much ! I tamed it down a bit by using less jalapeno and more bell pepper. It was a perfect amount of heat for us !!

I have canned a lot of salsa throughout the years with great success. This year I was looking for a recipe that was thick and a little crunchy and fresh tasting. The recipe is excellent and there’s no need to change a thing unless you want a hotter salsa. I can’t recommend the recipe enough!!! Thank you!!!

This is pretty much my exact recipe, only I stopped measuring a long time ago and I’ve never tried using canned tomatoes along with the fresh. Fresh salsa is definitely the way to go. I can’t even eat canned salsa anymore. One thing I do sometimes to add depth is to roast the tomato, garlic, and jalapeno (just throw it all on a baking sheet and let it go for about 20 minutes at 400F, turning once if I’m not feeling too lazy). This in combo with the fresh cilantro and lime juice gets rave reviews. I bet using canned tomatoes would add a similar depth!

I love home canned salsa, especially when made from fresh garden tomatoes and peppers out of my garden. But I’ve always been frustrated with these salsas always being runny and thin, even if the recipe calls it chunky. I’ve also been disappointed with the strong vinegar flavor that most home-canned recipes usually have. Comparatively, the store bought stuff is always really thick and chunky, and never has much of a vinegar flavor, but inevitably, it never has a really good fresh tomato flavor. It’s been a lose lose battle for me between store bought and home-canned salsas for years.

Streetlights flickered across the dusty lanes of La Yarada as Gloria flipped tortillas over a fiery comal, which she’d inherited from her grandmother. Ice cubes clinked inside a cocktail shaker as Joshua sloshed a tequila, amaretto and lime juice concoction into salted margarita glasses.

Hi Martha. I haven’t tried, but I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t use green tomatoes. It’s my understanding that green have more acidity than red, so safety shouldn’t be a concern. They are obviously more sour, not being ripe, so you may have to adjust the sugar content accordingly. You may be able to skip the “draining” step as well, being that green tomatoes have less water in them than red rip ones do. Before you bottle and process, taste the batch and adjust your sugar and spices from there. The taste after cooking should be pretty much the same as after processing. Anyhow, if you give it a try, let me know how it turns out. I’m curious to know.

Thanks Cheryl. Glad you loved the salsa. Like you said, the recipe is pretty mild, but that way it’s a safe bet for all. I tend to add more jalapeños myself too, but the baseline recipe is a winner. Thanks for the comment. Come back again and try some other Bald Gourmet treats.

There are many varieties of salsa to choose from and endless ways to tweak current salsa recipes. Our fresh garden salsa recipe below will turn out right about in the middle of the heat spectrum – medium spiciness if you will. If you want to spice up your salsa more, or turn down the heat, simply vary the amount of Jalapeno peppers that you add to the salsa recipe.

I made it tonight…tried some off the spoon ….pretty tasty…I added some Serrano peppers and more jalapeños to make it more spicy…hands are burning but my mouth is watering….thanks…used tomatoes from my garden

Hi Lucy. You can use lemons instead of limes, as the acid content is about the same. However, there is a flavor difference between the two of course. But unless you have a jar made with limes and a jar made with lemons, you will probably never know the difference. I hope you enjoy the salsa. Let me know how it turns out.

Made with the freshest of ingredients, Avocado-Mango Salsa stands alone as an appetizer with your favorite chips, or serve this salsa as a topping on your favorite white chili. Here, we served it with White Lightning Chicken Chili.

Treat it like you would any other opened salsa. The Eat By Date website recommends 5-7 days for homemade salsa and 1-2 weeks for commercial jarred salsa that has been opened. I would aim for 7 days max.

Fabulous recipe, Jeanette. I made it on Friday with some of my home-grown tomatoes. My version is a little chunkier because my food processor wasn’t up to the task & I had to chop everything by hand. Very tasty, though. I’ll be making it again.

I’d say it is mild to medium. You can definitely taste it for spiciness while cooking to judge the spiciness. During cooking the spiciness will just distribute more evenly and blend in better, so you’re not just getting heat when you bite on a piece of hot pepper.

I would like to try your salsa this year. However, I am not a big fan of vinegar in salsa. I successfully substituted lime juice in the recipe I canned last year. Do you think that would work in this one as we’ll? Thanks!

I followed Cassie’s idea with roasting the tomatoes briefly in oven for 18 minutes. Skin slipped right off. Microwaved half a dozen ears of corn, 3 minutes per ear, sliced off the kernels from the cob and added to the mix. Next year I will roast on the grille to see how that changes the taste. This is a nice mild to medium basic recipe you can tweet in so many ways.

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