“baja fresh green salsa recipe homemade salsa recipe with fresh tomatoes and cilantro”

Good morning Cheryl. If you’re looking for thick salsa, you’ve come to the right place! Our salsa is thick and tasty! The extra effort is well worth the results. There isn’t any reason you couldn’t use a pressure canner with this recipe. Let us know how it turns out.

Put the tomatoes in boiling water about a minute and then immediately submerge them in ice water for easy peeling. As you can see, the skins loosen from the tomato. Peel your tomatoes for fresh tomato salsa to can.

Use a ladle to fill the hot jars with the hot salsa, leaving ¼ inch head space. Close the lids and place the jars in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes. Make sure the jars are fully submerged under water with several inches of water above them. Remove the jars and let them rest undisturbed for 24 hours before moving them.

In this salsa from Casa del Sol in Cuidad Juárez. Mexico, the peppers are roasted and the tomatoes and onions broiled, giving the salsa a deep, roasted flavor. This salsa is traditionally mashed by hand if you decide to do the same, remember to wear gloves and don’t wipe your eyes.

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The pressure cooking idea worked out good but would work out better if I had only made the single recipe. I didn’t drain the tomatoes while prepping them; rather, I drained them for a few minutes after coming out of the pressure cooker. Next batch I make, I’m going to cook the tomatoes in the pressure cooker for 45 minutes, drain and add all of the ingredients back into the pressure cooker(one less dirty pot is a good thing).

Tags: Canning Recipes, Chilies, Cilantro, Garlic, Gourmet Garden, Home Canning and Food Preservation, Mexican Recipes, Onions, Peppers, Recipes, Tomato Early Girl, Tomato Garden, Tomato Recipes, Tomatoes, Vinegar

The USDA does accept that if you take an approved, tested recipe and make minor alterations to ingredients that does affect the preserving properties, that should be ok.  But there are a lot of if’s in that statement.  For example, substituting 1 teaspoon of ground chili spice for 1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper is probably fine, but substituting 1 cup of apple juice for 1 cup of lemon juice would not be.  Unless you really know what you’re doing, you should probably stick to the approved recipes.  The preserving recipes I publish, like the one above, are all from the USDA, universities or established canning authorities. Granny probably never did lab cultures and bacteria counts to test that her recipe was safe; you were her test guinea pig, and that’s not as reliable as a culture (next time you might get sick)

I just made a double batch. I liked the look of the recipe, and just jumped in! We grow heirloom tomatoes, so I used green zebras, sunny orange ane black plums. Since they are much jucier than Romas, I drained off a lot of liquid and boiled it down, then added it at the end. Worked great. Thanks Katie

Tomatoes have enough acid to require only a water bath for processing; but by the time you add the other ingredients which have no acidity, you’ve got a food that can spoil easily. That’s why most salsa recipes include a couple of cups of vinegar or lemon juice (both very acidic).

Hi Kate. I have not. This is the way my mother taught me to do it and she canned this way for over 50 years. The steam sterilizes them, but boil them in your canner if your more comfortable with that. Either way works I’m sure. Hope you enjoy the salsa!

Treat it like you would any other opened salsa. The Eat By Date website recommends 5-7 days for homemade salsa and 1-2 weeks for commercial jarred salsa that has been opened. I would aim for 7 days max.

1 Sterilize jars and lids in water bath: Place steamer rack in the bottom of a large (16-qt) stock pot or canning pot. Place new or clean mason jars on the rack. Fill the jars with water and fill the pot with just enough water to come to the top of the jars. Heat water to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes. (Keep the jars warm while preparing the salsa.)

We lived in West Texas for 18 years and now live in NE Pennsylvania. Didn’t have to worry about Salsa in Texas as there was a Mexican restaurant on almost every corner. Not so in PA. I have been making my Salsa (Mexican Chili) from a good Mexican friend of ours now for 12 years with some adjustments, 1 large can of Furmano’s whole tomatoes, jalapenos, cumin, coriander, salt fresh cilantro (when we can get it), minced garlic, diced yellow onions, lemon and lime juice, and some other spices. Will have to say it is VERY good.Have had many people Rave about it who are transplants like myself from Texas and California.

Basically, everything is going to go into a big pot to be cooked. It doesn’t really matter in what order the ingredients go into the pot. I tend to put the vinegar, tomato paste and spices in first, if only because I’m afraid I’ll forget them at the end and have an incredibly boring (and unsafe) batch of salsa!

And when you’re hosting a party, have you ever noticed that the chips and salsa are the first foods to disappear? No matter how many fancy side salads, dips, or canapés folks set out, the chips and salsa are inevitably the most popular. You just can’t go wrong with the simple combo, and today I’ve upped the game.  With a fresh and easy homemade salsa, you’ll never go to the jarred store-bought version again!

You did forget one important detail however in the sanitizing.. YOU HAVE TO SANITIZE THE LIDS, and do not touch the rubber part of the lid as your oils in your skin will cause it to be unusable. I have canned for years, as does my mother in law.. I would not hesitate to can ANYTHING, meat or veggie.. 🙂 Just remember to sanitize the jars and lids!!

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Hi Erin. I believe Romero peppers are real sweet, aren’t they? Aneheims are more like a mildly spicy green bell pepper. The Romeros will probably be just fine, but will make the salsa a little sweeter, which may not be a bad thing. A closer substitute would probably be poblano peppers or yellow wax/hungarian peppers. But the nice thing about salsa is that you can use any peppers you like….just keep the quantity measurements the same when canning.

Now, I have had quite a few salsas that are wonderful.  Some are sweet and some are spicy and some are more eclectic (the mango/pineapple salsas, tomatillo, green tomato, etc.).  I just love salsa, and there are many salsa recipes that I have enjoyed.

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