“authentic mexican fresh tomato salsa recipe fresh salsa recipe avocado”

This was the first time I have made Salsa. I have a bumper crop of tomatoes this year so was searching for recipes. Can’t tell you how many I looked at before I found this one! The thickness of the Salsa is what appealed to me. I was not disappointed! This is an excellent salsa. Time consuming but worth it. I’m a beginner and I’m sure it will be faster next time. My only regret: not enough ripe tomatoes to double the recipe. I got 6 pints and it won’t last long! Next time I plan to add a little more heat. Thanks for the great recipe!

Excellent fresh salsa, so much better than store bought. I used a bit less sugar as my yellow & red tomatoes fresh from the garden were sweet. I added a little good olive oil based on other reviews, this recipe is a keeper!

I don’t understand why you have to cook the tomatoes for an hour and a half. If you’re draining them, that should reduce cooking time. There’d be absolutely very little nutrition left in these tomatoes don’t you think?

Hi Lucy. You can use lemons instead of limes, as the acid content is about the same. However, there is a flavor difference between the two of course. But unless you have a jar made with limes and a jar made with lemons, you will probably never know the difference. I hope you enjoy the salsa. Let me know how turns out.

For mild salsa try hot peppers lower on the Scoville scale, such as poblano or even bell pepper. Remove all veins and seeds. Offer pickled serrano peppers to guests who enjoy fiery salsa. Buy an authentic brand such as Herdez.

THANK YOU for sharing this recipe. I have tried so many other recipes that have been a major fail. This salsa is spectacularly flavored! I used jalapeños because I am wimpy. My husband is ready for another batch, and so am I. Again, thank you for sharing this perfectly flavored salsa. YUM!

I need to start making my own salsa because we buy the jarred stuff use it for our meal and by the time we use it again it’s no longer good. At least when I make it I can control the quantity and fresh always trumps jarred. Love the brightness!

10 Let jars cool, lids should pop: Remove jars from the water bath and let sit on a counter for several hours until completely cool. The lids should “pop” as the cooling salsa creates a vacuum under the lid and the jars are sealed.

This was the best salsa I’ve ever made. Just like the salsa at my favorite Mexican restaurant. I used a jalapeno and took all the seeds out b/c I had a kid eating. Had virtually no heat. Leave the seeds in the peppers if you want heat.

To keep the corn from drying out on the grill, soak the ears in water first. You can grill the corn and bell peppers at the same time, but check the peppers earlier, since they cook faster. The salsa is great as an appetizer or as a topping for grilled meats, fish, or poultry.

A few questions. You mention coring. The Plum tomatoes I used were a bit big. Maybe 3 1/2″. After skinning, I cut them lengthwise into 4 quarters. And had to core each quarter. There was a lot of core on each one. Took a while to finish. Is that normal for smaller tomatoes? Any easier way?

made a double batch and it is a too vinegary? Is there a way to fix this or does it need to sit longer, canned 6 days ago? I have enough ripe tomatoes and peppers to do another double batch but don’t want it to be too vinegary too.

Put the tomatoes in boiling water about a minute and then immediately submerge them in ice water for easy peeling. As you can see, the skins loosen from the tomato. Peel your tomatoes for fresh tomato salsa to can.

An easy way to always have salsa on hand – no canning required. You control the heat by changing the type and amount of hot peppers. The 8 jalapeno’s called for in this recipe keep things sane. Introduce some cayenne peppers to increase the heat, some chipotle peppers for smoky tones and some habaneros, scotch bonnets or ghost peppers for insane heat. What’s your preference?

This is fantastic! It took me the better part of the day after shopping for ingredients, and it was worth every effort. I love thick salsa and this recipe is a winner. Thanks for making this available on your site.

The tomatoes are coming in fast and furious and we know the dangers of frosty nights are just around the corner.  Sadly, there’s only so much fresh salsa we can eat at any given time – it’s time to squirrel some of that spicy chip enhancer away for the winter months.

I made a double batch last night and my husband can’t get over how delicious this recipe is! It truly IS thick!! I am in the middle of another batch only this time I tripled it. That way I should be done for a year. Thank you SO much for sharing this recipe and taking the time to experiment to find that “just right” recipe! I really appreciate it!

Carl, thanks for the comments. Glad you like the salsa! As for coring, I usually just cut out the top stem/core, running my knife into the top of the tomato at an angle, essentially cutting a diamond shape out of the tomato, which includes most of the core. I do the same thing for any small tomatoes in the batch. But if yours are too small, just do the best you can. Small plum tomatoes often don’t have much of a hard stem/vine core anyway, so you may just be able to skip this step.

I’m really looking forward to fresh garden salsa. It’s been quite chilly and gray here in Northern Massachusetts as well but luckily, no frost. Hopefully, that will be the last of the snow that you’ll see this spring.

Dang, sorry to hear that Rod. Not sure why it would be so vinegary. I just made a quadruple batch last weekend and everything turned out perfectly again. Double check your measurements is all I can think of. Glad to hear it is normally a hit recipe though.

Take a break from classic tomato salsas and opt for a fruitier, seasonal option. This sweet-tart condiment features crisp, slightly acidic Spartan apples, though Fuji, Jonagold, and Liberty apples would also work nicely. This fresh, fruity salsa is the perfect addition to any Fall menu or fun occasion, and it’s super easy to make. Eat it straight out of the bowl, snack on it with chips, or serve with pork or roast chicken. Serve it immediately, or let it sit overnight to let the flavors incorporate.

To Adjust the Spice Level: The seeds/membranes in the jalapenos holds the heat.  For a milder salsa, remove all of the seeds and membranes, for a spicy salsa, leave them in! Replace with green chiles for a milder flavor.

I’m sure it would be fine to can as long as you know what you’re doing when it comes to canning. I think there is a specific process you have to go through with the cans. I’m sorry I’m not more help, but I’ve never tried canning. Every year I tell myself I’m going to can salsa, but I never get around to doing it. I would google canning salsa, so at least you know the process. Good luck!

Shannon, anaheims are very mild, and serranos are pretty hot. I fear that if you substitute the anaheims with the serranos, the salsa will be too hot to eat. It might work out if you take out all the seeds and white ribs/pith. Just be careful.

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. If you prefer a smoother texture―more like jarred―pulse half the salsa in a food processor, then combine it with the remaining chunky half. Cover tightly and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

With tomatoes so abundant in gardens and Farmer’s Markets right now, why not make a batch yourself? You don’t even need to can it — this freezes well so you can enjoy the taste of summer all year long!

The jars need to be HOT and STERILE. I run mine through the dishwasher and keep them in there hot and sterile until I fill them with HOT salsa. NEVER put cold to boiling hot into glass jars of any type. You can also use a bleach bath in the sink and exchange the water occasionally from a boiling kettle to keep them hot. Just rinse the jars before filling them.

My wife did not start cooking until shortly before moving to the US. She also is from Peru and so the first meal she prepared for me was Aji de Gallina. From Chicha to Pisco & Papa Relleno to Ceviche she has taken me on a gastronomic adventure thru Peru & other parts of South America. We look forward to reading more from you.

The best way to peel tomatoes is to get a large pot of water boiling and then place the tomatoes in the boiling water for 30 seconds.  (Some suggest placing them in ice water next, but that isn’t necessary for this recipe)  When you remove the tomatoes from the boiling water their skins will start to split (you may need to assist them by piercing them with the tip of a knife) and they can then be easily peeled.

Love this recipe! I canned some last year and saved the recipe. Making some right now in fact! My husband said that this salsa has ruined him for all other salsa’s! He’s not a picky eater but he knows what he likes and he loves this! So good. I think the cumin and chili powder add a lot! I didn’t use clear jell b/c I didn’t have any but I did like the other reviewer and just simmer the tomotoes longer and it thickened right up. Love this recipe…thank you!!!!

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